2019 Kinesiology Commencement

2019 Kinesiology Commencement


>>Good afternoon,
please be seated. Welcome to the 2019 School of Kinesiology Commencement
Ceremony. [ Cheering and Applause ] I’m Tom Templin,
Associate Dean for Faculty and Undergraduate Affairs,
and I have the privilege to be your host today. Before we begin the program,
and as a courtesy to others, please take a moment to
silence your cell phone so we can enjoy this
ceremony uninterrupted. I would also like to
remind guests to remain in your seats during
the awarding of degrees. Thank you. What an incredible day this is. We are in this magnificent
Hill Auditorium, full of happy, energetic, and proud graduates,
surrounded by their families, friends, and our faculty
and staff, who are here to celebrate your success. We are so excited to have a very
special commencement speaker, Dr. Barry Franklin, who
has a distinguished career in cardiac rehabilitation. Barry, thank you for
joining us today. I am proud to say that we will
be led in song today by one of our very own kinesiology
students, Jeffrey Walker. I’m sure you’ll be quite
impressed by his talents. And I’m also proud to say
that the Kraus Building, the site of our school’s new
home in the fall of 2020, is directly across the street;
and you may have noticed some of the photographic signage
that now adorns the fence line across the street, and depicts
various members of our faculty and labs from our school. This will be a ceremony filled
with hugs, smiles, laughters, and tears — I may even
shed a few, and reminders of how far you have come since
your first days on campus. You’ve had research
opportunities, internships, study abroad experiences,
clinical rotations, group assignments, and other
intellectually challenging projects that have added
to your academic portfolio. You have enjoyed great social,
cultural, and athletic events, including some of our Final Four
appearances and championships. And most importantly,
you have made friendships that you will cherish for
the rest of your lives. This afternoon is about
bittersweet endings; you have exciting
new beginnings, you have distinguished
yourselves in a population of high-achieving students
who have worked hard and accomplished a great deal. Today’s events will leave you
with many wonderful memories of a celebration shared by
family, friends, and the faculty and staff at the
School of Kinesiology. We all know that
it’s a team effort to make it to graduation day. Graduates, please stand and
give your family, friends, and our faculty and staff
a round of applause. [ Applause ] [Inaudible Comment]>>Thank you. [ Background Sounds ] Our celebration today
will move rather quickly, and at the conclusion of the
ceremony, the platform party and graduates will depart
immediately to the second floor of the Michigan League
for our reception. There will be plenty of
opportunities for photo shots, and refreshments, and
opportunities for words of congratulations, and
of course on farewells. Now, please rise
as Jeffrey Walker, a graduating Sport Management
master student sings our national anthem. Gentlemen, please remove
your hats and mortarboards. [ Background Sounds ] [ Singing ] [ Cheering and Applause ]>>Thank you, Jeffrey. [ Background Sounds ] Now, that’s a six-year veteran
of the Michigan Glee Club. [Applause] Thank you, Jeffrey. It is now my pleasure
to introduce our dean, Dr. Lori Ploutz-Snyder. Dr. Snyder became the leader
of our school in July of 2016, after a very successful
tenure as a professor at Syracuse University, followed
by a distinguished career as a lead science in
Exercise Physiology at the NASA Johnson
Space Center in Houston. Dean Ploutz-Snyder, on
behalf of our faculty, staff, and students, I thank
you for your leadership over the past three years. Please welcome Dean
Lori Ploutz-Snyder. [ Applause ]>>As dean of the
School of Kinesiology, it is a great pleasure
for me to welcome you to this wonderful celebration
of our 2019 graduates. I would also like to use this
opportunity to take a moment to acknowledge our
amazing faculty. Faculty, please stand; and let’s
give them a round of applause. [ Applause ] You may be seated. It’s a very exciting
time to be in our field. According to the publication
“Inside Higher Education”, over the past decade, the
number of undergraduate students in kinesiology programs across the US has
increased by about 50%. This is reflected here in
increased application rates for all of our programs. We’ve received the largest
number of freshman applications to date in the history of our
school for this coming fall. [ Applause ] And it’s getting
more competitive. Fewer than 20% of our
applicants will be accepted into the School of Kinesiology. One of the reasons the demand to enter our school
is increasing is because of the opportunities
in athletic training, health and fitness, movement
science, and sport management, which are all rapidly growing. Michigan kinesiology
graduates in all of our majors and degrees are valued,
sought after, and respected. All of us here today know that Michigan kinesiology
students are energetic and effective leaders. You’ve seen it for yourself. They participate
in organizations such as Michigan Health Aid,
the Sport Business Association, The Organization for
Athletic Training Students, the Michigan Sport Business
Conference, Phi Epsilon Kappa, student government, exercises,
medicine, and many others. They have won a host of awards
from our school, the university, and even national organizations. Many of our students are
international travelers, gaining significant
global experience to enrich their education. They work as teaching
assistants in a wide range of our kinesiology classes. They conduct research in labs
and centers across campus, publishing scholarly
professional journals, and have written for
the Michigan Daily or the mgoblue.com. Our students have worked on and
off campus, competed on athletic and academic teams, excelled in
independent study opportunities, interned with sports
organizations, companies, hospitals, clinics, schools. They are active,
motivated, and are very busy. The students of the class
of 2019 leave Kinesiology with strong optimism as
they begin the next phases of their life. Many of our movement science
graduates will pursue advanced degrees in physical therapy,
occupational therapy, medicine, or public health. Others will begin their careers as healthcare workers
or researchers. And 11 of our Movement Science
graduates will enter the exciting new world of
intraoperative neuromonitoring. [Sound] [Laughter] Our athletic
trainers will take their conditioning and healing skills
to the sidelines of high school, college, and professional
sports team. Some will begin graduate studies
in areas like physical therapy, biomechanics, or sports science. Graduate school is also
the next step for some of our health and
fitness majors. Others will work as
health educators, community and corporate wellness
providers, and athletic performance
trainers, using their knowledge to build a healthier
community workplace and world. A large percentage of our sport
management students will begin climbing the ladder at sports
franchises, media companies, and other corporate
organizations, and others will pursue
advanced degrees in business, sport administration, and law. I know that each of you
graduates and your families are as proud of your accomplishments
at Michigan as we, your faculty members and
advisors, are of you. As you take the next
steps in your life, you carry our sincere
congratulations and best wishes with you. And it is especially fitting that such a great graduating
class benefits from the wisdom of our exceptionally
accomplished commencement speaker, Dr. Barry Franklin. I’ll tell you a little
bit about Dr. Franklin. He received his Bachelor
of Science in Health and Physical Education
from Kent State University, his Master of Science in
Health and Physical Education from the University of
Michigan School of Kinesiology, just a couple of years ago,
and his Ph.D in Physiology from Pennsylvania
State University. Dr. Franklin is the past
editor-in-chief of the Journal of Cardiopulmonary
Rehabilitation and Prevention, and the American Journal
of Medicine and Sports. He’s the past president of
the American Association of Cardiovascular and
Pulmonary Rehabilitation, and a past president of the American College
of Sports Medicine. Currently, he holds formal
editorial board appointments with 15 different scientific
and clinical journals; I will not name them
all off for you. He is also the current chair of the American Heart
Association’s Council on Nutrition, Physical
Activity, and Metabolism. Dr. Franklin and his associates
have studied the hemodynamic and cardiorespiratory responses
to numerous occupational and leisure time activities. Other areas of his research
interest include the primary and second prevention
of heart disease, and the risks associated
with sporadic, high-intensity exercise. Dr. Franklin has
written or edited more than 500 publications, including
375 papers, 77 book chapters, and 27 books, and has
received numerous awards from the American Colleges
of Sports Medicine, the national Association
for Health and Fitness, and the American Heart
Association, among others. While these accomplishments
are impressive, the impact he has made on
society is immeasurable. As a pioneer of
inter-professional education, Dr. Franklin has worked
tirelessly to integrate, expand, and blend the exercise,
physiology, and cardiology disciplines. The cross-transfer
of knowledge, skills, and abilities has anchored
exercise science firmly in the cardiology world, and complemented the medical
management at patient’s at risk for or with chronic disease. Dr. Franklin embodies
the Michigan difference by working every day to make the
world a better healthier place. Please help me welcome School of Kinesiology alum
Dr. Barry Franklin. [ Applause ]>>Good afternoon. I’d like to express my
appreciation and gratitude to Dean Ploutz-Snyder and
Associate Dean Templin for the honor of serving as
your commencement speaker. Thanks also to Ann
Travis, and Joe Gagliardi for their assistance
with logistics today. Last, but certainly not least,
my sincerest congratulations to all of you, the graduates
we are honoring here today. Years ago, I became fascinated
with a simple question, “Why do some people
thrive while others seem to tread water and
merely survive?” I began reading everything
I could on leadership and success strategies, and
carefully studied the stars in their respective fields. I asked myself, “Were
there common behaviors that these superstars
exhibited?” You bet there were. My take-home message today
for you graduates is this, leadership, professional
opportunities, and success don’t just
happen, you create them by demonstrating certain actions and behaviors on
a regular basis. My experience in
applying these behaviors to my own life was
confirmed by a book I read by Marc Myers entitled,
“How to Make Luck”, in which Myers contends that
90 to 95 percent of all lucky or unlucky things that happen
to you are not by chance, but because of things
you did or didn’t do. One of the common
denominators I found in researching highly-successful
people was articulated by the late Steve Jobs. He said, “The only way to do
great work is love what you do.” These sentiments were
echoed by Pat Williams who at the time was the vice
president of Orlando Magic; and I love this quote. It says, “Figure out what you
love to do as young as you can, something you’re good at, and
then get somebody to pay you to do that for the
rest of your life.” [Laughter] What else did I learn? I learned that highly successful
people take 100% responsibility for their life. They embrace the ten most
empowering two-letter words, “If it is to be,
it is it up to me.” I also learned how rewards
equal our contribution, specifically serving others
or helping others fill a void or special need in their lives. I tell young graduates,
“Focus on your contributions, and the rewards will come.” Perhaps the late Zig Ziglar, a
success guru, summed it up best when he said, “You can get
anything you want in your life if you help enough other
people get what they want.” This evening I’m going to share with you seven specific
success strategies. Strategy number one, “Dedicate
your life to a cause greater than yourself, and
your life will become a glorious adventure.” Pivotal event in my career was
joining the American College of Sports Medicine 1969,
and I became active in the organization and other
professional associations over the next five decades. My association involvement would
lead me to service, learning, travel, and leadership
opportunities I never dreamed of, including serving
as president of two national associations. Regularly interacting
with nationally and internationally-renowned
professors, scientists and clinicians who shared
my passions for the field, many of whom ultimately
became close friends and esteemed colleagues, as the MasterCard
commercial says, “Priceless.” [Laughter] Number two, “Set
goals and set them in writing. Look at them often and
take action every day to achieve them.” I was taken back by a
study I read and conducted at a decent university
called Stanford years ago. They looked at highly-successful
people, and they came up with a sobering
finding, which I loved. IQ and grades were not
the major ingredient for future success in life. So those of you who graduated
with a C plus or a B average, you still can make it. [Laughter] Three
predictions, three predictors of the most successful people
in the world, self confidence, perseverance, and the number-one
factor, tendency to set goals, achieve them, and cross
them off your list. Here’s a copy of our
latest book on heart health. And there’s a generous
[inaudible] gift certificate, courtesy of the School
of Kinesiology. Who wants it? [Laughter] They’re
here for the taking. [Laughter] Who wants it? Wait, wait. [ Background Talking
and Laughing ] [ Applause ] You just taught us
a valuable lesson, inertia is the single
greatest barrier to success, and it’s also the
easiest to overcome; all you have to do is act. Any action you take
will do the trick. Get off your butt and move in
the direction of your goals. Why, because the
universe rewards action. Strategy number three,
three of the seven, “Cultivate people skills
and collaboration.” I’m a student of highly
successful people. There’s a restaurateur,
a national restaurateur who is now worth about
a billion dollars. I heard him interviewed on
the television the other day and they said, “What’s
your secret? How do you do so well
in the business world?” I was taken back by his answer. He said, “Every business
associate I meet, every customer I meet, I
pretend they have a sign around their neck. And that sign says, ‘Make
me feel important’.” If you indeed ask the CEOs — and I studied this stuff as a
hobby, of Fortune 500 companies, “What’s the number one
prerequisite you’re looking for in hiring and promoting
people,” they will tell you, “The ability to work
with people.” What are they looking for? They’re looking for people
of integrity, that is people who do what they say
they’re going to do. They look for people who
will shower their employees or colleagues with
praise and appreciation. They’re generally people who are
very generous with their time and support, and individuals
who are truly nice people. I worked with a lady from the
American Heart Association who I thought had the most
challenging job in the world. Her name was Shay Kennedy. She worked with the
CEO, the chairman of the board, all these people. And I said, “Shay,
what’s your secret?” She said, “Take a
look at every email. At the bottom of my email,
I have my philosophy.” So I checked it out. The bottom of every email
from Shay Kennedy [inaudible], “It’s nice to be important, but
it’s more important to be nice.” I sincerely believe that nice
people doors open up for them. Best advice I’d give you is,
“Surround yourself with stars in their respective fields who personify these
characteristics.” In other words, Emerson
said it best, “Hitch your wagon to a star.” Finally, “Collaborate with
others who have skills, abilities, and resources
you don’t have.” I’m a big fan of the movie
director Steven Spielberg. I like you watched “ET”, “Schindler’s List”,
it goes on and on. I heard Spielberg
interviewed one time. And they said, “Spielberg,
you’re a genius. How do you do all
these great movies?” He said, “I’m not
a genius at all.” This is Steven Spielberg
talking. “I’m not a genius at all.” “So what’s your secret?” He said, “If you want
me to direct your movie, you’ve got to hire two guys, Steven Spielberg,
but a friend of mine. His name is George Lucas. [Laughter] George comes up
with all my special effects, and George makes me look good.” Successful people surround
themselves with people who make them look good, and
give them lots of credit. Strategy number four, “Recognize that setbacks line
the road to success.” Abraham Lincoln lost
eight elections before becoming President. Colonel Saunders,
Kentucky Fried Chicken, had a thousand rejections
before he sold his first chicken recipe. Authors of “Chicken Soup for
the Soul”, a zillion seller. Canfield and Hansen
approached more than 140 publishers before
somebody said, “Okay, we’ll give this a shot.” Perhaps the most sobering
excerpt I ever saw I read in the 2008 Commencement
Address at Harvard. This author said, and I
quote, “I think it fair to say by any conventional
measure a mere seven years after my graduation day, I
had failed on an epic scale. An exceptionally short-lived
marriage had imploded and I was jobless, a lone
parent, and as poor as possible to be in modern Britain
without being homeless.” Who am I talking about? [Inaudible Comments] Exactly, Blockbuster
“Harry Potter” series. The point I want to make to you
as you embark on the real world to work, time and time again
the most successful companies and careers have
proven unequivocally that failure is the
lifeblood of innovation, and mistakes are the
portals of discovery. The bottom line is embrace
those setbacks and you’re going to come upon those setbacks. Embrace those setbacks to
motivate you to take action that will ensure future success. I love Dolly Parton’s
beautifully captured the essence of life’s setbacks when she
said, “If you want the rainbow, you’ve got to put
up with the rain.” How true it is. Strategy number five, “Strive
for constant improvement.” Learning doesn’t
stop here today. I’m a student of the
Professional Golf Association. And I look at the PGA
rankings every year, and they’re very insightful when you compare
good to great people. Let me give you some
sobering data. The difference between
the number one and number ten golfer each year
in the PGA, what they score in 18 holes, it’s about
1.5 shots; 1.5 shots. I started studying
this stuff in 2002. There was a golfer, you may have
heard the name, Tiger Woods. [Laughter] Tiger Woods in
2002 was the number one golfer in the world. He averaged 68.56 shots. Number ten golfer
in the world got — the name is Sergio Garcia, he
averaged 70 shots in 18 holes. What does that mean? It means Tiger Woods beat
Sergio Garcia by less than one and a half shots every
time they played 18 holes. Tiger Woods won seven
million dollars in 2002, Sergio Garcia, $1.9 million. But that’s not the
end of the story. There’s a company, you may have
heard of them, called Nike. Nike decided in 2002 they were
going to award the top golfer in the world with a 60 to 80 million dollar marketing
contract which Tiger Woods got because he was just a
little better than the rest. The moral of the story is this,
“Don’t rest on your laurels. Constantly try to make yourself and your performance a
little bit better over time; small improvements,
big rewards.” Strategy number six, “As you
get out in the real world, routinely try to exceed
people’s expectations.” I read a fascinating story in People’s Magazine a few
years ago about a cab driver in Manhattan that makes
$50,000 more a year than all the other cab drivers. What does this guy do
that nobody else does? Well, first of all, he gets his
cab cleaned on a regular basis. Secondly, he buys copies of
Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and has them in the front
seat, and if somebody walks in he says, “You want a USA
Today or a Wall Street Journal?” Thirdly, he’s got a
coffee bar in the back of his cab and juices. And lastly, there’s the
radio — you don’t have to — depending on — he doesn’t —
depending on the cab driver, you’ve got the channels
right in front of you. As you sit in that back seat,
you can put on music or not. What has he learned? He’s learned that people
often respond in kind, as I did when I signed my
contract at Beaumont in 1985. I was moving from another
hospital, and I had talked with the chief medical officer, and we had agreed
on a salary figure. So Dr. Rutsky’s secretary
called me and she said, “Dr. Rutsky wants you to come
in and review your contract and sign it, and we’ll
get you started.” I remember coming to his office;
secretary gave me the contract. I sat in a corner and
I’m going through it to make sure everything was
right; and something was wrong. The salary was wrong. The salary was $5,000
more than we agreed to on the phone a week earlier. I’m an honest guy, so I
said, “Is Dr. Rutsky here? I need to talk with him. There’s an error
in the contract.” So she says, “Wait one second.” So I walked into his office
and I said, “Dr. Rutsky, sorry to bother you, but
there’s an error in my contract. It’s $5,000 more than we
agreed to a week ago.” He paused for a second and
he looked at me and he said, “I decide your salary. You don’t decide your
salary, I decide your salary. [Laughter] And you’re
worth $5,000 more.” [Laughter] That got
my attention. And exceeding my expectations
strongly motivated me to show him that I was worth it. So it wasn’t usual for me
to work 80- or 85-hour weeks for the next three years. He more than got
his $5,000 back. [Laughter] Finally,
strive for greater rewards. I’ll tell every one of you
graduates, “Go for the gold.” High school teacher
addressed his class of seniors as he passed out the final exam. Said, “Since most of you guys
are going to college next fall and I know grades are important,
I’ll give an automatic B to anyone on the final who
wants to skip the exam.” Most of the students sighed
with relief, jumped up and left the classroom. Wow, great. Teacher then handed
out a one-page exam to the four remaining students. It included just two sentences. “Congratulations, you’ve just
earned an A in this class.” [Laughter] Keep believing
in yourself. Go for the gold. In summary, building a
highly-successful career is not a matter of circumstance
or of chance. I hate it when somebody
says people are lucky. You make your own luck in life. Building a highly successful
career is a matter of choice. Love what you do,
or if you don’t find out what you love to do. Secondly, focus on
your contributions, don’t worry about the rewards. Thirdly, constantly
review your written goals and take action to achieve them. Next, embrace opportunities that organizational
membership provides. Be a member of a major
professional organization. I can’t tell you the
benefits that has held for me and so many others. Cultivate people skills
and collaboration. Understand that failures and rejection line
the road to success. Strive for constant improvement
one year to the next; you’ve got to be better. Routinely try to exceed
people’s expectations. Go for the gold. And lastly, from a
practical perspective, do more than you’re paid to do. The people that move up in any
organization invariably raise their hand when the boss
asks for volunteers. Doesn’t hurt, just get in the
habit of saying, “I’ll do it.” Those are the people who are
promoted, who are doing more than they are being paid to do. Closing, a scene in
the classic movie “Dead Poets Society”
perhaps summed it up best. Professor John Keating,
played by Robin Williams, standing with his class
of all boys, in a hallway that was lined with trophies
and framed pictures of students who had graduated
decades earlier, Williams asked his students to
peruse the faces of the past, adding, “You’ve walked
past them many times, but I don’t think you’ve
really looked at them. Look at those pictures of people
who were here 60, 70 years ago.” He then posed the critical
question, one that’s relevant to every one of you here
today, “Did they wait until it was too late
to make from their lives and to even one iota of
what they were capable? Because you see,
gentlemen,” he said, “these boys are now
fertilizing daffodils. But if you listen real close, you could hear them whisper
their legacy to you; come on, move in, look at their
faces,” to which he said, “Carpe diem, seize the day. Make your lives extraordinary.” Thank you very much. [ Applause ]>>And now you know why he
has this incredible record. [Laughter] Thank you,
Barry, for your thoughtful and really inspiring remarks;
much appreciated, thank you. Our program continues with
our first student speaker, Bedar Noor, who is receiving his Master’s
Degree in Sport Management. Bedar? [ Cheering and Applause ]>>Talk about a follow-up. [Laughter] Good evening. Thank you again, Dr. Templin
for the wonderful introduction, and thank you for joining us, and for those wonderful
words, Dr. Franklin. And congratulations to
my fellow class of 2019. [ Applause ] I am Bedar Noor, a
fellow graduate student in the Sport Management
program. Growing up as a first generation
Somalian American and a Muslim, I have lived most
of my life uncertain of where I truly belong. I always viewed the
intersectional nature of my identity as some sort
of a burden, and it permeated into every aspect of my life. It was during my
years in college that I finally became
comfortable with who I am, and began to view these
insecurities as a strength, instead of an affliction. However, it is this great
University of Michigan that gave me the keys to
fully mature and blossom into the well-rounded individual
that you see before you. This university took a young
man from a community school in Detroit, apprehensive
about how he fits into the mission culture,
and made him believe that it is indeed his uniqueness
that made him the right fit. From the moment I stepped onto
this campus, I instantly learned that this school is
full of students like me with unique backgrounds
trying to find their way. My classmates came to the
University of Michigan from China, and India, and
all across the United States. Some of my classmates came
straight from undergrad, while others had families
and years of work experience. But instead of shying
away, they embraced it, wearing their distinct
identities with pride, which inspired me
to do the same. But it also taught me a lesson, which is that you
are never alone. Although our stories may be
different, we are all going through personal struggles,
and through those struggles, we can find mutual ground. There have been many
instances this year where this was apparent. My cohort and I came
together with nothing in common. However, through our
mutual loathing of the hill, walking up to the
OBL through all of the many Michigan
elements, [laughter] and the occasional tears shed
after a long week of exams, we learned that we
are in this together, and that we need each
other in order to succeed. Whether it was working as a team
on projects, or coming together over some free food, thanks to
Ms. Charlene and Dr. Armstrong, which like as a broke
college student, believe me, like I am still grateful for it. [Laughter] We began to treat
each other like family. And that is what the Michigan
difference is all about. Prior to coming here, I perceived the Michigan
difference as a great education and access to a blue
chip network. And all of these are
very much apparent; that’s not the whole story. I now know that the Michigan
difference is the comprehensive understanding of yourself
and others around you. It is the ability to work with
others who may not look or talk like you, but together you
create something special. It’s standing up for
what you believe in, even if it’s against the world. And of course, we’ll
always have unlimited access to new Michigan
memes on Facebook. [Laughter] So class of
2019, I conclude with this. As we navigate life and become
the leaders of tomorrow, never shy away from who you
are and what you believe in. Make the impossible possible. Go through your journey knowing that not only has this great
institution equipped you with the skills to become
world-class researchers and practitioners, but that
you’ve made this prestigious university better, due to
your uniqueness and grit. And that is truly the
Michigan difference. Thank you. [ Cheering and Applause ] [Inaudible Yelling] And now I have the honor of introducing two excellent
undergraduate speakers, Efe Edevbie and Katharine Bohlmann. Thank you. [ Cheering and Applause ]>>Thank you, Bedar. Welcome School of Kinesiology
faculty and staff, friends and family, and class
of 2019 graduates. It’s been a long
road to this night. I’d like to take this moment to congratulate all
the 2019 graduates on your accomplishments. [ Applause ] My name is Efe Edevbie,
and I’m a 2019 graduate of the Sport Management Program,
minoring in Political Science.>>And I’m Katharine Bohlmann,
and I’m also a 2019 graduate of the Sport Management
Program, otherwise known as the best network in sports. And I’m also graduating with
minors in Business and Spanish.>>We, the School of
Kinesiology class of 2019, have shared many
experiences in our time at the University of Michigan. And in this time, we
have been able to see and feel what a true
academic community looks like. Our majors may have been
different, athletic training, health and fitness, movement
science and sport management, and our post-graduation
career plans will take us down many different roads. Yet, we have all been
connected through kines, and the school’s
commitment to preparing us to be tomorrow’s leaders. Being a transfer student,
I was excited and eager to immerse myself into
the Michigan experience, and they make up for the lost
time once I got on campus. To me, it’s become
increasingly impressive to watch and discover how people at this
university go above and beyond to pursue their passions and
interests, achieve goals in and outside of the classroom,
and push forward society in new and innovative ways. Whether it’s been
through my work in Central Student
Government, or Music Matters, or any other extracurricular,
I’ve been inspired and touched by other Michigan
students’ relentless pursuit of excellence, and a commonality
among us that tells us we ought to do more and be the
best in all we do. All this withstanding, it’s been
my experience within the School of Kinesiology that is truly
reinforced this concept of Michigan excellence
and idealism. We’ve been driven, galvanized,
and energized to seek out our dreams through
our interactions, the school’s excellent
faculty and staff, our amazing, amazing blue alumni, and by
each of you, our esteemed peers. We’ve worked closely with our
wonderful advisors and the staff in OUSA to build and construct
our individual paths here at U of M. We’ve worked closely
on challenging course content and research with our faculty. We’ve gotten to know
our peers in each of our programs during
long study sessions, while collaborating
on lab research, or as Katherine will
tell you more about, during the legendary sport
management group projects. And with these experiences,
we’ve all come to know the power of community here in the
School of Kinesiology, a community that somehow
managed to shrink a campus of 29,000 undergraduates and
15,000 grad students to a home that can be found any given
weekday at the OBL, CCRB, or 555 South Forest Building.>>For those of you that know
a little bit about the types of things we learned
in our SM projects, you’ll know that we have a
lot of projects to complete, legendary projects,
as Efe said. We have a joke in the SM program
that we don’t have final season, but we have an SM
group project season. But these projects
are what make us, us. And as I reflect upon
my past four years here, I realize that these
group projects in many ways were a preview
of our lives to come. First, our professors randomly
assigned us to small groups to work together on the
project for the semester. We learned quickly that
several unique personalities can in fact work well together
and complete quality work, not without some bumps and
challenges along the way, but learning to work with
people is a core value that we’ve learned here. As we enter into the real world,
we will be hired and selected for various graduate schools
and jobs based upon our ability to contribute to the group, based on our individual
strengths. Our unique personalities
will be our greatest asset. After groups were formed for our
class projects, we always began by making a group chat,
and then a Google document so we could communicate
effectively and divide the research
and writing tasks. In the next phase of our lives, the people in our group
chats will be the people that we stay in touch with. For me, it will be my peers from
our sport business association, and my Michigan football
coworkers. For some, it might be our
Phi Epsilon Kappa fraternity members, our Michigan Sport
Business Conference team members, or perhaps our
Kinesiology Student Government council members. Whoever our group
chats might include, these will be the people
for the rest of our lives. And as we enter into the real
world, we are all going to go on and write our own stories,
and forge our paths in our respective industries. However, much like
with a group project, we are all working towards one
common goal, being the leaders and the best in our fields. Our group project will no longer
be graded for letter grades, but Kines has prepared us to
excel in our respective fields. I look forward to the day that
I get to sit alongside one of my fellow SM wolverines
and be a part of something innovative
in the sport industry. Those of you going into
medicine, research, athletic training, or health
and fitness, I can’t wait for the day that I hear about fellow Michigan Kines
graduates working together to make the world
a better place. Almost of all of our
projects concluded with a final presentation. As we continue on with
our individual paths, we will continue to get
better each day of our lives. As we progress to our
careers, we will improve to become the best
leaders that we can be. Class of 2019 graduates,
it’s show time tonight. This is the day of our
final presentation. This is the day we
present and celebrate all of our accomplishments
throughout our years at Michigan.>>Kinesiology is a
study of human movement. So I think it’s fitting to share with you what has
moved me during my time at the School of Kinesiology. I’m moved by my classmates
here at Kines, by their incredible passion,
their commitment to invent in sports and athletics
to new frontiers, and their relentless
work ethic and hustle. I’m moved by the professors
and faculty here at Kines, who are the best
in what they do, and who I’ve received
nothing but endless support from since the moment
I stepped on campus. At Michigan, we don’t settle
for anything except our best. The phrase, “Iron sharps
iron” cannot be more true at a place like this. Being your classmate has moved
me to be more and to be great, pushing me to excel beyond what
I once thought were my limits. As you depart here as
alumni this evening, I challenge all my
fellow graduates to ask themselves,
“What moves you? What are the things that will
continue to motivate, inspire, and drive you well after
these final moments as University of
Michigan students? What are the things others might
find mundane and unexceptional that you find to be
invigorating and exciting? What are the ideals and
values that will propel you to maximize the most
of your professional and personal lives?” As we transition to the
next phase of our lives, finding our [inaudible]
will continue to elevate us to be the leaders and best.>>The School of Kinesiology
is truly a special place, and has become our home
over the past few years. However, it’s truly the
people that make Kines, Kines. We have built a community
along the way, and our time at Kines has really just
been one giant group project. We’ve helped one another
through the highs and the lows, with laughs and tears along
the way, and in the end, I know that all of
us would do it all over again starting tomorrow. But there’s good news. This group project
is just beginning. It will continue on and
follow us along as the way, as we conquer the world as
doctors, commissioners, CEOs, researchers, trainers; and
the list goes on and on. I know that we will always
support one another as a team. So to quote one of our
legendary football coaches, “We are the Kinesiology team
of 2019, the Kinesiology team of 2019, the Kinesiology
team of 2019.” [Laughter]>>To the staff in the Office
of Undergraduate Affairs, thank you for helping
us really make it through our collegiate careers. To our faculty, thank you for
imparting your wisdom, insights, and knowledge onto us. To our families, thank you for helping support us
these past few years. Finally, to the Class of
2019, thank you for being you. Our experience in Kines
will surely not be the same without all of you, and for
that, we can’t thank you enough.>>So for today, goodbye,
for tomorrow, good luck, and forever — hold please,
we say go and you say blue. Go –>>Blue.>>Go.>>Blue.
>>Thank you. [ Applause ] And now, we’d like to
introduce Heidi Haite, Chair of Kinesiology
Alumni Society. [ Applause ]>>Thank you Katharine
and Efe. Good afternoon, everyone. My name is Heidi Haite,
and I am the Chair of the Kinesiology Alumni
Society Board of Governors. On behalf of the entire
Alumni Society Board, congratulations on
your graduation. It’s my honor to welcome
you as the newest members of the Kinesiology
Alumni Society. All graduates of Kinesiology
are automatically members of our Alumni Society. We hope that you will
continue to be strong, loyal, contributing alumni in the years
to come, and stay connected to the School of Kinesiology, to its program-specific
LinkedIn groups, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram feeds. Many of you have received
the direct benefit of alumni networking connections
for jobs and internships. In fact, I’ve met some
of you via social media, networking events, and emails. I’m sure you understand
firsthand the value of these global alumni
networking opportunities. Career services support
is an essential component of the Alumni Board’s
mission, and the School of Kinesiology’s Career
Development Center. I urge you to take advantage of your post-graduation first
year discounted membership to the university’s
Alumni Association. Enroll online to receive
all your benefits. You are now part of the
largest living alumni family. And as part of officially
welcoming you to the University of Michigan alumni family, the Kinesiology Alumni Society
will be giving you all a black M pin to wear with pride and
let everybody know it’s great to be a Michigan Wolverine. On behalf of the entire
Kinesiology Alumni Society, congratulations to
you, the Class of 2019, and welcome to the
Kinesiology University of Michigan Alumni
Society’s Go Blue. [ Applause ] I would now like to invite
Evelyn Chodock, President of the Kinesiology Student
Government to the podium. [ Cheering and Applause ]>>Thank you, Ms. Haite. Good afternoon and
thank you for being here to celebrate our
graduating students. My name is Evelyn Chodock,
and as I’m sure none of you knew before
now, I am the President of Kinesiology Student
Government, an organization that strives to improve the
kinesiology student experience. It is my honor to present
the 2018-2019 Excellence in Teaching Award. This award gives students the
opportunity to recognize School of Kinesiology graduate
student instructors, lecturers, and fulltime faculty. Kinesiology students nominate
individuals, and a committee of Kinesiology student
leaders select the winners. The recipients are chosen based on their superior
classroom teaching and innovative structure —
instruction, their dedication to challenging their students
to learn and explore educational and professional
opportunities, and their concern for students inside and
outside of the classroom. Our first award winner is
graduate student instructor Mr. Mark Pataky. Our student said, “He is
the best lab instructor I’ve ever had. He is very knowledgeable,
explains things in a way that I can clearly understand,
makes real-world connections, and fosters an open and
positive environment in class. He is extremely helpful,
available, and quick to respond
to questions. He cares about both the subject
matter, and his students.” I would like to invite
Mr. Pataky to the stage to accept his Excellence
in Teaching Award. Congratulations, Mr. Pataky. [ Applause ] [ Background Sounds ] Congratulations. [ Applause ] Our second award winner is
lecturer Dr. Adriana Phelan. Our student said, “She
is really passionate about the courses she teaches,
as well as her students. She is an incredible instructor, and helped me grow
tremendously as a student. She always makes sure that
we get something out of each of her lectures, and can apply
it to our own experiences. She is very experienced with
Business Communications, so I definitely learned
some very applicable skills, and found all of
the class topics and assignments very
relevant and helpful. She is one of the nicest
instructors I’ve had here at Michigan.” I would like to invite
Dr. Phelan to the podium to accept her Excellence
in Teaching Award. Congratulations. [ Applause ] [ Background Talking ] Our third award winner is
lecturer Dr. Kathy Clark. [ Cheering and Applause ] Our student said, “Although
she’s a difficult grader, [laughter] she gives
constructive feedback and helps you learn.” Shout out to [inaudible]. She is amazing and super
helpful in office hours. She makes it very easy
to get more excited about scientific writing. Because of her, my writing
skills improved tremendously. I really loved this class
and I learned so much. I myself had the
privilege of learning from Dr. Clark before I had
my first ever internship after sophomore year. A few weeks ago this very
semester, Dr. Clark sat down next to me in the lobby
of the CCRV while I waited for a meeting to begin. She not only remembered the
exact topic I wrote my paper on two full years ago,
but remembered exactly where my internship
was that year. That alone is such a testament
to her dedication to learning about each student she teaches to ensure they feel
valued and respected. I would like to invite
Dr. Clark to the podium to accept her Excellence
in Teaching Award. [ Cheering and Applause ] Our fourth and final award
winner is Associate Professor Dr. Melissa Gross. [ Cheering and Applause ] Our student said, “She is the
only person I could ever have for an 8:30 a.m. class. [Laughter] She makes
it so enjoyable that you forget how early it is. She goes above and beyond
to keep the class as lively as possible, and
explains things in a way so understand how
the body works, rather than just
memorizing anatomy. She’s an effective and
engaging instructor who makes you love anatomy. I had the privilege of taking
Motion Capture with Dr. Gross, and I vividly remember
the day my group and I finished analyzing
all of our data from a semester-long project. She stopped the class and
said, “Congratulations, you’re all officially
movement scientists. I enjoyed every minute
of her class, and know she has made the
Michigan experience more positive for so many
people in this auditorium.” I would like to invite
Dr. Gross to the podium to accept her Excellence
in Teaching Award. Congratulations. [ Cheering and Applause ] I would now like to welcome Dr.
Gregory Cartee to the podium. But before I conclude, I want to congratulate my fellow
graduates, the Class of 2019. I wish you the best
of luck in all of your future endeavors,
and forever Go Blue. [ Cheering and Applause ]>>Thank you, Evelyn. Research makes an integral
part of the academic experience in the School of Kinesiology. And we encourage our
students to take advantage of the many opportunities
available to them throughout
their studies. For example, graduate and undergraduate students
may complete a thesis, working closely with
a faculty member on a specific research problem. Indeed, working with
these students is one of the great pleasures of
serving on the faculty. I would like to take
this opportunity to acknowledge those students who have completed a
research thesis this year. Students, please stand
as I call your name. I ask the audience
to hold your applause until all names have
been announced. The graduate students completing
a Master’s thesis are Chiwoon Ahn [assumed spelling], “Exercise
Training Induces Subtle but Meaningful Changes in Subcutaneous Adipose
Tissue Morphology in Obese Adults Even
Without Weight Loss.” Christine Callahan,
“Concussion and Depression: Assessing Concussion
Outcomes and Depression”. The undergraduate students
completing a Movement Science honors thesis are Evelyn Chodock, “Identifying Predictors of Upper
Extremity Muscular Elasticity with Healthy Aging;” and Claire
Ford, “Neuromuscular Adaptations to Varying Prosthetic
Ankle Power and People with Transtibial Amputation.” The undergraduate students
completing seniors thesis are Lauren Dougherty, “Long-Term
Effects of Concussion on Eye Tracking Patterns;”
and Natalie Taylor, “Metabolic Responses to Short-Term Overeating
in Healthy Adults.” Congratulations, all. [ Cheering and Applause ] Now, at last, the moment
you’ve all been waiting for, the graduates themselves. [ Cheering and Applause ] I’d like to ask Ms. Haite
to take her position onstage, and students remember to
receive your pin from Ms. Haite and pause for a photo
at the far end of the stage before
returning to your seat. So Kinesiology confers
the following degrees, Doctor of Philosophy, Master
of Arts, Master of Science, Bachelor of Arts, and
Bachelor of Science. We begin by granting
our doctoral degrees. The following descriptions that I’ll be reading
represent a synopsis of the dissertation project that each doctoral graduate has
completed under the supervision of a graduate faculty mentor. Dr. Ketra Armstrong, Associate
Dean for Graduate Affairs, will assist in the
hooding of our graduates, along with their
faculty advisors. So Kara Palmer and
Dr. Leah Robinson, please join Dr. Armstrong. [ Background Sounds ] So Kara Palmer’s
dissertation is titled, “An In-Depth Investigation
of the Effects of Preschool Motor
Environments”, and focuses on how
child-level characteristics and instructional approaches
shape movement behavior. Kara is a focused researcher
with a clear research agenda. She has 14 peer-reviewed
manuscripts, and is the lead author
on six of these papers. Kara has received
several recognitions for her scholarship, including
the American Kinesiology Association Graduate
Student Writing Award, and the Rackham Pre-doctoral
Fellowship. In addition to being a
highly productive scholar, Kara is an exceptional teacher. She was awarded the 2017 School
of Kinesiology Excellence in Teaching Award, and was the
2018 recipient of the University of Michigan Outstanding Graduate
Student Instructor Award. Kara is a rare student
who possesses the passion, determination, and curiosity
for research, plus a dedication for teaching and service. Following graduation, Kara will
begin a clinical professorship position in the School of
Kinesiology at the University of Michigan, to continue working on an ongoing federal
research project, and continue her
line of research. Congratulations, Dr. Palmer. [ Cheering and Applause ] So now, Dr. Jeff Horowitz
will read the next dissertation synopsis. Mark Pataky, please join Dr.
Armstrong and me on the stage. [ Background Sounds ]>>Mark Pataky’s
dissertation is titled, “Mechanisms for Exercise: High
Fat Diet and Fiber Type Effects on Insulin Stimulated Glucose
Uptake in Skeletal Muscle”. His research has
provided novel insights into the biological processes that underlie the detrimental
effects of a high-fat diet on glucose uptake and skeletal
music at the cellular level, and revealed new information
about mechanisms that account for the reversal
of these defects after a single session
of exercise. Mark has been exceptionally
productive during his four years at Michigan. In addition to his teaching role
as graduate student instructor, for which he just received the
Excellence in Teaching Award, Mark provided outstanding
mentorship to seven undergraduate students, working in the Muscle
Biology Laboratory. He also published seven
manuscripts for his research at Michigan, with two other
manuscripts in preparation for submission later
this summer. After graduation, Mark will
begin a postdoctoral fellowship funded by the National
Institutes of Health at the Mayo Clinic. His postdoctoral research will
focus on the role of exercise on energy metabolism and protein
turnover in diabetes and aging. Congratulations, Dr. Pataky. [ Applause ]>>Okay, Landy Di Lu and Dr. Kathryn Heinze
[assumed spelling], please join Dr. Armstrong
on the stage. Landy Di Lu’s dissertation is
titled, “Institutional Change Around Sport Policy: Passage of Youth Sports Concussion
Legislation Across States”. Her research sheds light
on processes and tactics of organizational and
institutional change in sport. Landy earned a number of awards and distinctions during
her time at Michigan. She was the runner-up for the
prestigious North American Society for Sport Management’s
Student Research Competition, and a recipient of a Rackham
Dissertation Fellowship, Stanley Kemp Scholarship, and Zatkoff Family Graduate Fellowship. Landy’s students credit her with fostering a positive
classroom environment, and making difficult
concepts easier to understand. Landy recently started the
postdoctoral fellowship at Western University
in London, Ontario. Congratulations, Dr. Lu. [ Cheering and Applause ] Elena Simpkins, please — [ Cheering ] Please join Dr. Armstrong
and Dr. Heinze on the stage. Elena Simpkins’ dissertation
is titled, “Black Women in Sport Leadership:
An Exploration of the Sport Intersectional
Model of Power (SIMP).” Her research,
which is based on a model that bears the first four
letters of her last name, S-I-M-P, seeks to fill
a void in the literature by elucidating the factors that influence black
women’s opportunities and experiences in
sport leadership. The practical implications of
her research will contribute to the creation of
organizational cultures and sport where black women
can thrive as leaders. Elena has been a
regular presenter at the North American
Society of the Sociology of Sport Conference, and
has a couple of manuscripts in preparation for
publication consideration. She received the
Students of Color and Rackham Activist Award,
served on the UM Counseling and Psychological Services
Student Advisory Board, and was recognized as a UM
Central Government 200 for 200, featuring 200 of
Michigan’s most involved and accomplished students. In addition to earning her PhD, Elena also earned a graduate
certificate in Women’s Studies and a Professional
Development Diversity Equity and Inclusion certificate.>>She did it. [Laughter]>>She also had her acting
debut by performing as “The Lady in Green” in the play
“For Colored Girls”.>>She did it. [Laughter]>>Elena’s career
aspirations are to work in the sport industry
in a capacity related to promoting diversity,
equity inclusion. Congratulations, Dr. Simpkins. [ Cheering and Applause ] So please join me in once again
congratulating our newly minted doctoral graduates. [ Cheering and Applause ] And I will now turn the
stage over to Doug Tribou, the voice of Michigan Radio’s Morning Edition, who will recognize
the 2019 Master’s and Bachelor’s Degree graduates.>>Thank you, Dr. Cartee. I’d like to ask Dr. Armstrong to
take her position on the stage to congratulate the Master
of Science graduates. Students, as you
cross the stage, remember to shake your faculty
member’s hand, receive your pin from Ms. Haite, and pause
for a photo at the far end of the stage before
returning to your seat. [ Background Sounds ] Allison Crew [assumed
spelling] [applause], Christine Elizabeth
Callahan [applause], Alex Denton [applause],
Maya King [applause], Alana Maria St. Ong
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Claire Danielle Toochberry
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Austin McBee [assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Samantha Bower [assumed
spelling]. [ Applause ] Rachel Naomi Loge
[assumed spelling]. [Applause] Meghan Erin
Gatworth [assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Jajune Ju [assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Ling Chi Shon Gwon
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Han Fe Wu [assumed spelling] [Applause] Shu Obi Han [assumed spelling] [Applause] Yoo Yan Jong [assumed spelling] [Applause] Nicole Alexandria Johns. [ Applause ] Consuela Bolton. [ Cheering and Applause ] Dara Watkins. [ Cheering and Applause ] Bedar Noor. [ Cheering and Applause ] Jeffrey Walker. [ Applause ] Drew Jonathan Stamp. [ Applause ] Daniel Joseph Robbins. [ Applause ] Kenneth Lester Viera. [ Applause ] Casey Alexander Klein. [ Applause ] Chobin Jai [assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] [Laughs] Rebecca Yesiday Emily
Pratt Clark [assumed spelling]. [ Cheering and Applause ] Marissa Nangling Day
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Bailey Warner Baker. [ Applause ] Hannah Meyer. [ Applause ] Andrew Jay Bauman
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Steve Michael Smith. [ Applause ] Malia Nicole Bates. [ Cheering and Applause ] Mariah Danielle Collins. [ Applause ] Esther Harrison. [ Cheering and Applause ] [ Background Sounds ] I’d like to ask Dr.
Riann Palmieri-Smith to take her position onstage
to congratulate the Bachelor of Science Athletic
Training graduates. [ Background Sounds ] Rihanna [assumed
spelling] Kennedy. [ Cheering and Applause ] Ariana Bethany Senn
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Mohan Dong [assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Kayleigh Dannaher
[assumed spelling]. [ Cheering and Applause ] Madeline Paige Reyes. [ Applause ] Jenny Drayson. [ Cheering and Applause ] Kayla Nugent. [ Cheering and Applause ] Shaylin Rose O’Keefe
[assumed spelling]. [ Cheering and Applause ] Alice John. [ Applause ] Justin Robert Backult
[assumed spelling]. [ Cheering and Applause ] I’d like to ask Dr.
Natalie Colabianchi to take her position onstage
to congratulate the Bachelor of Science Health and
Fitness graduates. [ Background Sounds ] Jill Hayden Shiffman
[assumed spelling]. [ Cheering and Applause ] Edina Nicole Cabrisiak
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Marley Giddles [assumed
spelling]. [ Applause ] Ashley Chickerol
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Sydney Rogers. [ Cheering and Applause ] Megan Reese Reemer
[assumed spelling]. [ Cheering and Applause ] Katie Bradley. [ Applause ] Lily Caroline Butkovich
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Maria Milski [assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Isabella Rebecca Puig
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Paulina Rachel Vocovicz
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Abigail Grace Keeson
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Devon William Fuller. [ Applause ] I’d like to ask Dr. Leah
Robinson and Dr. Katherine Clark to take their positions onstage
to congratulate the Bachelor of Science Movement
Science graduates. [ Background Sounds ] Cameron Frances Rubino
[assumed spelling]. [Applause] Rio Saco [assumed spelling]. [ Applause and Yelling ] Madeline Grace DeClerk
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Kikalomo Naomi Sacony
[assumed spelling]. [Cheering and Applause] Alexandra Stelin
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Julia Frances Neveson
[assumed spelling]. [Applause] Amelia Ellen Simpson. [ Cheering and Applause ] Daniel Rose. [Applause] Scott Joseph Felposh,
[assumed spelling],Junior. [ Applause ] Jessie Dana Erlich
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Nelash Sai Peteretti
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Danny David O’Neil. [ Cheering and Applause ] Thomas Joseph Shepherd. [ Applause ] Claire P. Ford. [ Applause ] Kelly Ann Sweeney. [ Applause ] Catherine Owens. [ Applause ] Audrey K. Belf [assumed
spelling]. [ Applause ] Meg Darmafal [assumed spelling]. [Applause] Nicole Elizabeth Ruprik
[assumed spelling]. [Cheering and Applause] Lauren Alexandra Withhrow
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Tina Kim Lamb. [ Applause ] Monique North. [Applause] Hannah Gayle Landman
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Brianna Marie Holt. [ Applause ] Mateo M. Althoen
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Karina Maria Sola. [ Applause ] Alley Torrents [assumed
spelling]. [ Applause ] Zerene Menwalla [assumed
spelling]. [ Cheering and Applause ] Janice Kwon. [ Cheering and Applause ] Natalie Marie Taylor. [ Applause ] Jaylin Mae Jennings
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Trinn [assumed spelling] Smith. [ Applause ] Katherine Persad. [ Applause ] Felipe Machomy [assumed
spelling]. [ Applause ] Emily Mina Grossman. [Applause] Christopher Hayden Delaney. [ Applause ] Ali Hussein. [ Applause ] Jacob Kam [assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Erica Slausky [assumed
spelling]. [ Applause ] Madison Ann Goon. [ Applause ] Elise Dawn Ferrar. [ Applause ] Lauren Ashley Doherty. [Applause] Hannah Renee Drake. [ Applause ] Noah Michael Whitus
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Benjamin Adam Rhineheimer
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Kendra Yvonne Jones. [ Applause ] Rebecca Rose Mitchell. [ Applause ] Isabel [assumed spelling]
Rose Brickman. [Applause] Leah Brooke Frankel. [ Applause ] Erica Frances Colton. [ Applause ] Alyssa Nicole Sloan. [ Applause ] Nicole Weiner. [ Applause ] Alexandra Maria Talabat. [ Cheering and Applause ] Nathaniel William Wright. [ Applause ] Max Adamo [assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Seraphina Gabrielle
Provenzano [assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Anna Lane. [ Applause ] Josie Kreiger. [ Applause ] Nina Marguerite Hendler
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Deneill [assumed
spelling] Gary Young. [ Applause ] Katherine Esther Fuller. [ Applause ] Christina Joy Hansen
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Ian Alexander Harris
Lustila [assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Michael A. Casbin
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Jessica Sydney Katz. [Applause] Christine Noelle Benson. [ Applause ] Leah Pauline Cartarelli
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Madeline Goodson. [ Applause ] Megan Corret [assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Ellie Ann Grubenhoff. [ Applause ] Stephanie Iva Liu. [ Applause ] Samantha D. Bogart. [ Applause ] Caitlin Amber Hudlow
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Diana Tren. [ Applause ] Audriana Bordeman
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ]>>Go, Audrey.>>Carly Ann Zevlin
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Aaron Paul Van Horn. [ Applause ] Jacqueline Ruth O’Gorman. [ Applause ] Colleen Anne-Marie Wilson. [ Applause ] Mallory Lynn Grable
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Lindsay Yelang [assumed
spelling] Patterson. [ Applause ] Joseph Nathaniel Sharp. [ Cheering ] Elizabeth Marie Weeks. [ Applause ] Emma Louise Paul. [ Applause ] Katherine Lamb. [ Applause ] Reagan Britt. [ Cheering ] Caroline Joan Walsh. [ Applause ] Megan Eileen Kraust
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Molly Elizabeth Forrest. [ Applause ] Sarah Quinn Freed
[assumed spelling]. [ Cheering ] Allison Rose Honet
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Joseph Theodore Dalaki
[assumed spelling]. [Applause] Chanze Nurami [assumed
spelling]. [ Cheering ] Carly Shae Myerson
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Evelyn Florence Chodak
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] [ Background Sounds ] I’d like to ask Mr. Josh Mergos to take his position onstage
to congratulate the Bachelor of Science Movement
Science graduates, who have completed
an intraoperative neuromonitoring concentration. [ Background Sounds ] Karina Elizabeth Grain
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Sarah Pinone [assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Jessica Renee Cummings. [ Applause ] Madeline Patricia Jackson. [ Applause ] John William Bridenstein. [ Applause ] Jonathan Mitchell. [ Applause ] Benjamin Roscowitz
[assumed spelling]. [Applause] Beth Shrosby [assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Tasneem [assumed spelling] Ali. [ Applause ] Ostry Swenson [assumed
spelling]. [ Applause ] Oh. Sydney Elise Badger. [ Applause ] I’d like to ask Dr.
Mark Rosentraub and Ms. Kelli Donahue to
take their positions onstage to congratulate the Bachelor of Arts in Sport Management
graduates. [ Background Sounds ] Emily Tullis Latham
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] William Donald Hennessy. [ Applause ] Andrew Thomas Coleman. [ Applause ] Samuel Luen Popper
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Selime Hassan Mackie
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Emilian Elizi [assumed
spelling]. [ Applause ] Andrew Robert Vasquez. [Applause] Michael Roy Benedetto
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Christopher Michael
Fakasny [assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Melanie Allen. [Cheering] Carly Scott. [ Applause ] Maggie McQuaig [assumed
spelling]. [ Applause ] Samantha Lee Pratt. [ Applause ] Delaney Nicole Cleveland. [ Applause ] Brandon Michael Warren. [ Applause ] Peggy Shee [assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Jeffrey Joseph Walker, II. [ Applause ] Bennett Thomas Howard
Falisky [assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Tyler Ezra Bunderson
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Uliah Eviana Ivanova
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Sierra Lynn Lesko
[assumed spelling]. [Applause] Shayla [assumed spelling]
Marie Lamb. [ Applause ] Jacob Ignashik [assumed
spelling]. [Applause] Lindsay Marie LaForrest
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Elan [phonetic] Madison Johnson. [Cheering] Andrew William Barnes. [ Applause ] Jacob Tyler Wakai
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Henry Peter Crosby. [ Applause ] Daniel Lucas Diedrickson. [Applause] Kayleigh Marie Landers. [ Applause ] Jonathan James Markworth. [ Applause ] Jacob Zupanzik [assumed
spelling]. [ Applause ] Lee Mitchell Pakheizer
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Dante Lorenzo Mauricio. [ Applause ] Chase Barnett. [ Applause ] Courtney Lynn Richardson. [ Applause ] Caleb Samuel Rosenfeld. [ Applause ] Cooper Maxwell Lev. [ Applause ] Brian Horn. [ Applause ] Justin Kaplan. [ Applause ] Matthew Nadler. [ Applause ] Daniel Rosenbaum. [Applause] Caroline Ellory Abrams
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Caleb Michael Gershik
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Martin Frederick Wilder. [Applause] Gunner Logan Garn
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Margaret Louise Betez
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Peter Daniel Brown. [ Applause ] Alessandra Sophia Bolognia. [ Applause ] Kendra Kelly Lohan. [ Applause ] Kelsey Eileen Gilhuley
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Julie Kayla Boris. [ Applause ] Megan Rose Cotan
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Samantha Sevetes
[assumed spelling] Andrew. [Applause] Adrienne Ecker. [ Applause ] Ethan William Miller. [ Applause ] Jason Christopher Angus. [Applause] Jake Michael Fleshner
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Sam Taylor Rosenbloom. [ Applause ] Alexandra Simon. [ Applause ] Maxwell Cole Hogdkinson. [ Applause ] Sophie Lee Brown. [ Applause ] Andrew Glasser. [ Applause ] Alison Beth Coff
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Alana Pinto. [Applause] Abigail Kathleen Rush. [ Applause ] Abigail Jean Zacharias. [ Applause ] Brianna Alexis Burka. [ Applause ] Catherine Michelle McCray. [Applause] Bridge Mohan Sing
[assumed spelling]. [Applause] Asher Jordan Bond. [Applause] Justin David Kwan. [Applause] Devlin Joseph Frances. [ Applause ] Steven P. Moscowitz. [ Applause ] Jacob Seth Freed. [ Applause ] Joshua Ryan Bender. [ Applause ] Noah Linder. [ Applause ] Benjamin Canvasser
[assumed spelling]. [Applause] Lucas Cole Glassman. [ Applause ] Jonathan Michael Ulrich. [ Applause ] Gregory Hass Schwartz
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Benjamin Meyers [assumed
spelling]. [ Applause ] Emily Katherine Gerard
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Grant Froling [assumed
spelling]. [ Applause ] Okpalefe Oluwatobi Edevbie. [ Applause ] Alex Ross Skidkim
[assumed spelling]. [ Applause ] Katharine Dale Bohlmann. [ Applause ] [ Background Talking ] All of these students
have completed the degree requirements as prescribed
by the faculty of the School of Kinesiology. Dean Ploutz-Snyder,
it is my pleasure to present you the graduates
of the Class of 2019. [ Cheering and Applause ]>>Thank you, Mr. Tribou. Graduates, please stand. [ Background Sounds ] When you put on your
cap and gown today, your tassel should have been
placed on the right side, signifying that you
had not yet graduated. On behalf of the Board of
Regents of the University of Michigan, and the faculty
and the staff of the School of Kinesiology, I
congratulate you on your graduation this evening. Please move your tassels now
from the right to the left. [ Cheering and Applause ] Congratulations, well done. And I will turn the podium back
to Dr. Templin one last time. [ Background Sounds ]>>Thank you. And Doug, thank you,
you did a fabulous job with those pronunciations. Thank you very much. [ Applause ] Where’s our dancer? [ Background Sounds ] You rivaled the dancer from
two years ago; congratulations. [Laughter] Graduates,
congratulations. Ann Arbor will always be
your home away from home, and you will always be a
proud part of the history of the School of Kinesiology
and the University of Michigan. You are joining the largest team
at the University of Michigan, nearly 600,000 alumni
throughout the world. [ Applause ] On a personal note, I
came to this university at the same time you did,
nearly four years ago, when you entered the
University of Michigan, and it has been my privilege and
honor to be part of your class. I can’t say I’m graduating. [Laughter] I think I’m going to
stick around for a victory lap or two; but it’s
been my privilege. May you always uphold
the excellent tradition that defines graduates from
the University of Michigan, and certainly the
Michigan difference. Again, on behalf of
the faculty and staff, thank you for enriching
our lives. Good luck, and congratulations
to you, the Class of 2019. [ Applause ] Graduates, I think you
can sit, if you like; yes? Be seated, please. In just a moment, we will
conclude our ceremony with a song. But first, I need to provide you
with some final instructions. After we sing, we ask
that you all remain seated as the platform party recesses. The marshals will then dismiss
the graduates row by row. Families and guests,
please remain in your seats as the graduates depart for the
reception on the second floor of the Michigan League. The reception will be
in the ballroom as well as the concourse and
the Vandenburg rooms. See page three of your
program for specific locations. Now, please stand
again [laughter], and join Jeffrey Walker who
will sing — lead us in singing, “The Yellow and Blue”. Jeffrey will then lead us
in singing “The Victors”. The words for both songs are
on page three of your program. [ Background Talking ] [ Music ] [ Singing ] [ Applause ] [ Music and Singing ] [ Cheering and Applause ] Thank you, Jeffrey. Thanks to everyone
for your attendance. Congratulations to
our graduates. And we will see you at
the Michigan League. Go Blue. [ Cheering ]

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