A Crucial Role in the MBK Movement: Women’s Role in My Brother’s Keeper Alliance

A Crucial Role in the MBK Movement: Women’s Role in My Brother’s Keeper Alliance


(audience claps) – My name is Alice Thompson, and I am a Chief Executive Officer of
Black Family Development. As a woman in this movement, my vision is for boys and young men of color, is to really remove barriers that hinders the dreams and opportunities for boys and men of color. I am proud and committed to this work because this is my divine calling. It’s a ministry of love that is focused on opening
doors of opportunities, and also partnering to
build our beloved village on behalf of boys and men of color. My message to you is be a loving part of this village work by joining the village sisters,
the daughters, and mothers, as we stand in the gap
and to close the barriers, of pathways for boys and men of color. I am my brothers keeper. (applause) – Hi, I’m Linda Gibs. For 20 years I had very powerful positions in New York City government, supervising health and
human service agencies. I witnessed in those jobs
how well meaning people in organizations that
are devoted to supporting those in need could still
marginalize and even demonize and criminalize young men of color. I devoted myself to
unraveling the forces of structural racism by using
my power to shine the light, to raise attention, and to take action. As a principal now at
Bloomburg Associates, which is a non-profit consulting group assisting mayors internationally, we embraced President
Obama’s call for mayors to develop My Brother’s
Keeper local action plans. And we’ve worked with
over two dozen cities to achieve their mayors visions. My message to you is this. This work can not be
done without us, women. We dominate the front line of the work. Over three quarters of
social workers, teachers, nurses, non-profit employees are women. More than anyone, we have to get this. If we don’t get it, the experience of our young men will never change. This is a business in which
women need to make room for men. We can do better, we must use our power to change our institutions. I am my brother’s keeper. (applause) – My name is Antoinette Malvo,
and I’m Managing Director of Strategic Engagement and Initiatives at Casey Family Programs. As a woman in this
movement, my vision for boys and young men of color
includes a society in which their value and greatness is acknowledged, appreciated and celebrated
on a daily basis, and as an integral part
in which our society functions on a day to day basis. I am proud and committed to this work because I view this as
my civil rights moment, where I have the opportunity
from the many seats where I sit, to create conditions that positively impact lives,
to create a ripple effect, generating, magnifying, and geometrically multiplying that impact. My message to you is this. To understand that as a
woman in this movement, I’m your partner. Understand that your
success is my success, and my success is your
success, and that together our collective success is a
strength of our community. I am my brothers keeper. (applause) – Buenas Tardes. Soy Cecilia Gutierrez. Deputy director of My
Brother’s Keeper Alliance at the Obama Foundation, where I lead our network and partnership team. And I have been proud to lead the My Brother’s Keeper rising planning team. I want to begin by asking you to join me, in acknowledging my incredible colleagues at the Obama Foundation, partners, host committee,
steering committee, youth committee, and our volunteers who have worked tirelessly to ensure MBK rising was worthy of the incredible youth and
community leaders in this room. (applause) As a latina, with immigrant parents from the Dominican Republic,
as a mother of two black boys, as a leader, I am determined to do my part to ensure that the future of our children will not be defined by their zip code. I’m honored to be a part, thank you. I am honored to be a part of the My Brother’s Keeper movement. To join the growing and powerful voices around this country who are working to advance equity and opportunities for boys and young men of color. My message to you is this, we must remember that our children, that our boys and young men of color need to be told daily that we love them. All of you in the audience we love you. We are working to dismantle racism in this country because we love you. We are breaking down barriers and lifting up the voices and clearing paths to
opportunity because we love you. We are here all of us together in Oakland, because we love you. (speaks in foreign language) (applause) – (speaks in foreign language) Good afternoon, I am
the founding principal of the Native American Community Academy in the Naca inspired schools network, in Albuquerque New Mexico. (applause) And I currently serve as
the deputy secretary of identity, equity, and transformation for the students in New Mexico. As a Navajo and Lakota
woman in this movement it is our communities collective vision that boys and young men of color are academically prepared for college so they can pursue their passions, secure in their identity and healthy, holistically well, ready to lead. I am proud and committed
to this important work, and movement because of my relatives, our nephews, our brothers,
my father, our grandfathers, our ancestors and the
generations yet to come. My hope for you is that you stay rooted, grounded in your language and culture. That you have a lasting positive
impact on your community, when keeping an open
heart, soulful spirit, and a strong vision
that stems from the love that surrounds you in this room today. (speaks in foreign language) I am my brother’s keeper. (applause) – Hello, my name is Keisha Lance Bottoms and I am the mayor of Atlanta. (applause) As a woman in this movement, my vision for boys and young men of color includes my three sons and the
future I hope they will have, and the young men and boys
who look like them will have. And that is a future that includes equal opportunity to be all
who god created them to be. I am proud and committed to this work because the generations are
counting on us to get it right. My message to you is this, do
not grow weary in well doing. Continue to stand in the
gap for our children, for our families, for our communities, for our boys and young men who have been counted out
before they’ve had a chance to be counted in the game of life. In the words of Audrey Lorde, revolution is not a one time event. I am my brother’s keeper. (applause)

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