BRAC 2013 10 03

BRAC 2013 10 03


>>We’ll go ahead and
convene the meeting. It’s 2:35 according to the
clock on the wall there. Welcome our new cochair, Danny
Hamman [assumed spelling]. [Inaudible].>>Yeah.>>Danny and I had a chance to
talk for 40 minutes to an hour or so a week or so ago, so
it was a good conversation and I appreciated
Danny’s time to do that. So, we’re going to work together
going forward this year. With us today is Kel
Robinson [assumed spelling], the [inaudible] senate
president. So, she will be the regular
member going forward, is that correct? And then Rudy is not here today
but James is here in his stead. Gary’s not here today, but Cha
— we welcome Cha in his stead. Austin’s here, the
associate students. Jordan is not going
to be with us today. John and Dave are here
representing Imagine [phonetic] Association. And Joe Simonecci [assumed
spelling] and Maggie are here as resource folks for
the meeting today. So, the first quarter
of business is to approve the meeting minutes
from the August 22nd meeting, meeting number two of the year. Do I hear a motion?>>[Inaudible].>>Another one’s here. He slept in. [Inaudible]. Good to see you. So, a motion by [inaudible],
he’s seconded by somebody who was here.>>Second.>>John seconds discussion. All those in favor
signify by saying “aye.”>>Aye.>>Opposed?>>End abstention. Dan — Danny abstained. Okay.>>So do I.>>And Cha abstained. Okay. Thank you. Okay. So, the next
one on business, members of the public
Mr [inaudible] — Dr. [inaudible] here. Okay. Excellent. Okay. So, item number four,
well, there’s a lot of work that we will be doing relative
to the budget development and that’s item number
five, again, is more specific discussion about processed and
what have you. But, perhaps one of the more
significant challenges that TCC and every employer is going to be facing is the Affordable
Care Act as it relates to benefits — medical
benefits for all employees. So, in our particular
case, we are beginning to take a long look at that
and I’ve asked Joe to come in and discuss that topic
with everybody today and then be response
to any questions. Because at the end
of this process, this committee will be very
much involved in some decisions that we make going forward.>>So, the district actually
contracted with Keenan and Associates who is the
third party administrator that does all of our benefits
and our insurance coverage. They’re doing two studies. One is a workforce
impact analysis and the other one
is a — I’m sorry. One is a workforce analysis and
the other one is an impact study of the Affordable Care Act. We did have some notes
that we wanted to hand out, so I’m going to do that.>>Joe, can you do 30 seconds about what the Affordable
Care Act is in general…>>Sure.>>…sort of a briefing
introduction…>>Can you do that as
an interpretive dance?>>Yeah [laughter]. I don’t know if you would want
to see it [multiple speakers].>>You want me to dim
the lights for you?>>All right — no. Maybe after 5 p.m. [inaudible]. Okay. So, I actually had
some [inaudible] notes that I was going to hand out to describe what the
Affordable Care Act was and how it’s — how it
relates to the study but the — but, there were too many
typos [inaudible] there, so I pulled them back. But, the Affordable
Care Act is a law that was passed two years ago,
with a established start day of January 14 where every
employer had the ability to go back and look at their
benefits and their workforce to determine who would be
and who could not be covered and to set up an exchange
within the state for employees who did not have coverage
to get affordable coverage. Makes sense?>>The employees are
people, in general.>>We’re people — anybody.>>There you. Right.>>So, in our case, we
then contracted with Keenan and Associates to do this
workforce analysis and the — I’m sorry, workforce
study and impact analysis. And what they’re going to be
doing is coming in and looking at data from payroll to
determine where if any gaps in coverage the district
has a need to address. Actually, Manny, if you
can talk a little bit about the conference call
that we had a few days ago with Keenan and Associates and
kind of tell everyone what kind of information they’re looking
at to develop [inaudible].>>We’re basically looking
at two sets of data. One is the employee
information and it’s going to — it’s a combination of
payroll and HR data. And they’re looking at every
person who has received a check. So, that way, we’re
able to look — to pull all the data to see
who could be impacted and look at everything in case
there’s somebody we know or something like that. But, it’s going to be looking at
between the employee, the age, and how long they’ve worked
here, comings and goings, what type of employee they’re — it analyzes everything in
extremely great detail. The second study looks
at the work history. We’re going back to July of 2011 to get a really broad
expansive information. Affordable Care Act
doesn’t require that but that’s what we’re going to
be doing in order to make sure that we have this information. We can make some valid
wise choices and decisions. So, it’s looking at
everything to compare both in — historically what would happen,
what we’re going to be required to do based on this information
and then help us to build data for the future decisions.>>And some of those
future decisions, obviously, this is also known as
ObamaCare, so it’s very hot in the news right now
for obvious reasons. But, this really would
require the district to provide medical
care for any employee who works 30 hours
a week or long — that’s pretty much the
bottom line of that.>>That’s the bottom line,
and really, for the most part, off the top of my
head, we’re covered because we already do that. But, what this is going to do
is look for any of those gaps for instance of just
anything that we — that maybe there’s
something that has slipped — someone has slipped
in where perhaps that we don’t realized it.>>We’re covered but are we
covered for college assistance?>>So, that’s what…>>Yeah.>>…that’s what the
study is going to look at.>>Exactly.>>It’s going to look
at a college assistant who may work 900 hours a year
because the requirement is on average of 30 hours a week, then that person would
need to be covered. So, those are the
types of flexible…>>The other thing I
guess is adjunct faculty who are working very close to like what we might call full
load, or whatever percentage, three-fifths or however units,
because that’s another part of the analysis, correct?>>Yes.>>So…>>It’s looking at every single
person who’s received a check.>>So, as we’re ramping
up, there are requirements that the district has to follow. In the last pay warrant
and email on October 1st, you received and part of
your package is a memo from Maggie related to the…>>So page three and four and
they’re both double-sided.>>And this was the memo and
I forget what it’s called — the market place
coverage options. This was something that…>>[Multiple speakers].>>It’s not page
three — there you go. One back — it’s
double-sided page three.>>Oh no. It’s in
the other packet that they handed [inaudible]>>[Multiple speakers].>>Yeah, I got this.>>So, this was a requirement. These are the types of
things that will be coming out more often as
we’re ramping up and we’re getting more
experience and knowledgeable about the Affordable Care Act, more of these things
will be coming out. Going back to the
study and the analysis, Keenan and Associates will
at some point come back out and show us what their
analysis has uncovered for lack of a better word. And then we’re going to reestablish the
benefits committee that the district had I think
about a year and a half ago. And so, on the first
page of your package, we gave you an overview of the
previous benefits committee and who they were
in 2011 and ’12, who the members were
in 2010, ’11. And then, we are recommending
for fiscal year ’13, ’14 participants based on
the areas that they worked with that they represent. So, what we’re hoping for
is feedback from these areas about who’s going
to be appointed so as the benefits
committee is established and we can have these
conversations about the analysis
and the impact study. We can look at the Affordable
Care Act a little more closely and we can make some joint
decisions and recommendations, I should say, on how
we want to proceed.>>And so, this was, you
know, a very, very brief once over lightly, but
what we would suggest that we do is once we
reconstitute the benefits committee between staff and
Keenan, we would do kind of a relatively thorough
overview of the Affordable Care Act
and what it really means and what it’s all about. And the California —
what do they call it? California Co-op?>>[Inaudible].>>It’s — but whatever it’s
called, the California…>>It’s in here.>>So, another part
of your package is…>>Coverage [phonetic]
California…>>…the frequently
asked questions posting, that is now on our website
and on the benefits.>>The last three pages, the
last three double-sided pages.>>And the enrollment is covered
California, that’s [inaudible].>>Southern California…>>[Multiple speakers].>>So, in any event, we
would go over this FAQ.>>Yes, sir.>>So, I have a question
[inaudible] like the anticipated
bonus program. So, currently, I’m wondering if
you want to have the additional like exo-physio member being
[inaudible] who is the…>>Well, we’re not there yet. I mean, give me one second. So, wherever is going
with this is to say that when we do constitute
the benefits committee, we’ll go over the FAQ, we’ll do
the, you know, the dog and pony with the good PowerPoints and we’ll make sure everybody
understands the scope what we’re doing. Okay? Now, the question
now becomes, who do we want on the benefits committee, and
it doesn’t necessarily have to be just one person
from each one of the entities that
are down there. Okay. Yes?>>Can I ask — responding to
specifically that question, Teresa [assumed spelling]
and I have been in pretty standard
regular communication over the past year. And so, you know,
whenever something comes up about wellness
and communicate, and so we’re trying — I’ve
tried to include our — and the help there that we have
and any other kind of events. So, we are in communication
and maybe that might be the benefits
committee would decide that that’s something, it’s a
one-off instead of a permanent, but we’ll deal with that.>>Yeah. And, but one
of the points might be that Teresa may be an
excellent resource, you know, [inaudible] because
of her knowledge and her expertise
and what have you.>>Right.>>So, where I’m going
with all of this is to say, one of the things that I
like this group to do is to help determine the parameters
around the benefits committee. The only thing I would ask
you all to bear in mind is, I don’t know what — I don’t
know what level or types of decisions we’re going
to be asked to make. And if there’s a zillion people
on there, it’s going to make that much more challenging,
right? So…>>But, generally speaking,
just from my background, there’s usually the primary
and then the secondary. And so, does pieces you
usually keep it to a primary and a secondary when it comes
to a committee or is it…>>Well, there’s often
discussion, it becomes kind of like a Noah’s
Ark thing, you know. If you somebody got
two, they get two. If they get four,
somebody gets four. So, you know, what
we’re really talking about here is a discussion
that I’d like us to have now that bears in mind what the
task is, which is to try and to make sure that
we comply with the law and that we provide the
appropriate level of support that we can afford
to in relation to the new model what have you. So, we want members
on this committee who are both knowledgeable
about the topic to the extent that that we have them such
as Teresa, as well as people who are representing their
groups, but also understand that there has to be a level
of practicality as we go through this whole thing. So, the first order of
business then would be, do we have the right
categories there? Joe and Maggie pulled this from
other things that they’ve done in the past, so we have the
two shared governance groups, the classifieds and
the academic senate. [Inaudible] association also
being a [inaudible] group wearing kind of two hats,
shared governance as well as [inaudible] confer. We have our issue —
we don’t have the — well, we would have ISSU-CFT — I should say ISSU-CFT
representative, or representatives. That’s the classified staff from the collective
bargaining perspective. CFTA from the facilities
perspective. The faculty representative, this would be the faculty
association representative. And then POA is the
Police Officers Association and that’s collective
bargaining. So, these last four,
if you will, are the collecting
bargaining groups.>>And we missed one, I
think the confidential…>>And then the confidential’s
— yes, that would be correct. So, we need to add the
confidential’s there, which I would just put them not as a necessarily a collective
bargaining but would be kind of like a imagine association.>>Do you want to
include students or…>>Yeah, good question.>>Are they out of
this discussion because they don’t qualify?>>Well, not necessarily.>>Well, our…>>We have many students
who are employees.>>Okay. Student employees is
one issue, the students are — wouldn’t be covered in our plan.>>Yeah, students wouldn’t
but I think to the extent that you’ve got college
assistants and student assistants, many of which are students
[inaudible] category to include. Basically, just call it
the associated students. Is that fair enough?>>[Multiple speakers].>>[Inaudible] governance, I
would go with ASPCC as the…>>Associated students — PCC?>>Yeah.>>So…>>[Multiple speakers].>>[Laughter] Yeah.>>Is that something
that you’d want to wait to determine what the
impact is since…>>No, I’d like to — yeah. I want everybody there
from the beginning.>>Okay.>>I would say, and especially
with like a background check when that policy went through,
there would’ve been some things that if the students have been
there, we would’ve been able to counter them like like
get off really quickly. So, it might be good.>>Right.>>So, classified senate
and academic senate, associated students,
PCC, confidential’s, management association,
ISSU-CFT, CFTA, faculty association and POA.>>CSEA [phonetic].>>[Multiple speakers].>>But which one…>>It is CSEA. You guys are CSEA?>>[Inaudible].>>Yeah, but it’s not
CFTA, it should be CSC. I knew that — I did not…>>I think it’s ISSU-CFT and…>>It is ISSU-CFTA. Thank you. It should be…>>There’s too many letters.>>And then CSEA
represent — that’s the — I knew something
was — it didn’t — it wasn’t going right
in my head [laughter].>>I’m sure they’d be okay
with two people in there.>>[Multiple speakers].>>Well, we’re not saying…>>[Multiple speakers].>>[Inaudible].>>No, no. And that’s where I was going at. I just wanted to identify
the group [inaudible] and now we get to the numbers. So, but is — are
there any more groups? We can go down to
Caltech and see if they [inaudible] any other
group down there if you want. But this covers all
the waterfront? Okay. We’ve got the shared
governance side covered and we’ve got the…>>You need — how
about the adjuncts?>>Adjuncts were part of
the faculty association. They are.>>Yeah, they are.>>[Multiple speakers].>>Yeah, they are.>>They are represented by the
faculty association [inaudible].>>Yeah, which is
the one contract. What about retirees?>>Yeah. Well, but — yes and
let’s talk about the opportunity because retirees just get our
benefits whatever they are automatically up until age
65 and then they get the…>>[Multiple speakers].>>[Inaudible].>>And then they [inaudible].>>But if they come back and teach 30 hours,
do they get — what?>>Well, and that’s part of what
the [background talking] study is going to be…>>Representing that.>>Yeah, the — I
mean, as an adjunct, they’re not technically…>>You can’t. I mean, if they’re…>>If they’re adjunct…>>Yeah.>>Representative of
what we get as a retiree.>>No.>>Yeah.>>So, what I’m saying
is retirees, they get their insurance
up to age 65 and then they get the
supplemental, the…>>They can purchase
coverage after that, so — but considering they actually
are participants on the plans where [inaudible] on
the one side of it, the unclassified students
actually aren’t right now, there might be an
impact certainly — there’s certainly an impact
to them because we’re talking about their coverage, as well. But, you know, they might
decline to participate.>>They…>>Well…>>…the Gatsby
[phonetic] funds the $1440…>>Right.>>…additional that
they get when they hit 65 and hit Medicare,
then they get $1440.>>Right. I — if I
understand ObamaCare correctly, if you are on Medicare, you do
not have to use the ObamaCare.>>That’s right.>>So, that means…>>[Multiple speakers].>>…know all these people are.>>Well, and there’s
multiple parts of Medicare, so some of it cannot
be impacted, some of it can’t — won’t be. However, there’s — there are
a good handful, I want to say, over a hundred, I believe. They’re actually
paying for coverage.>>Okay. Well, that
— with that in mind, then the answer is
definitely that I guess.>>And they’re paying that out
of their pocket full price…>>Yeah.>>…so there’s an impact.>>Okay. So, we’ll say TCC
Retirees Association or, I guess is what they call it. Okay?>>That needs research.>>Yeah, it sure does. Okay. Anybody else? Any other group, I should say. Okay. Good. So, now, we’ve got that. So now, let’s talk about
the numbers of folks.>>You got 14 groups that
I count with the three that you added, and
that’s a pretty large group for — to making decisions. My recommendation is, you
have a single representative with an alternate so that
everyone is represented if someone can’t make it. All right. That — otherwise, if we
double this, it’s getting huge.>>Okay.>>Well, and my only concern
with that is, you’ve got like, confidentials or POA that were
— we’ve got one representative on the committee
that represents — I don’t know how many
confidentials there are, but not nearly as many as
faculty or classified, so…>>There’s only a
handful of confidentials.>>Or adjunct.>>Okay. So, that person has
got one vote for whatever it is, 15 people as opposed to…>>So…>>Again, I don’t know what
this [background talking] does.>>1 through 315 [laughter].>>Yeah, right. So, let me ask you this. It seems like it’s a
one-size-fits-all decision, right? [Inaudible] whatever
we decide as a college, that eventually the
board might decide, applies to everybody
per the law. So, whether I represent a
group of 12 confidentials or a full-time faculty of 380
plus another thousand adjuncts, if the same thing applies. Whatever we do for this group is
— will be done for that group.>>Right.>>Does that make sense? So, if the concern is and I
guess that is the concern, Danny, that my vote representing
12 could be making a decision detrimental to the 1200…>>That’s my point.>>…there’s a concern, yeah.>>If the committee there to
be making the vote or be making to be — making recommendations
to the administration?>>Well, good question
but either way.>>Okay.>>Either way, whether it’s a
recommendation or a decision, there is a concern
about representation. So, I suppose if we set an
upper limit cap on the size of the committee and came up with some complicated
mathematical algorithm, you sort of back into, you
know, the number of percentages on the basis of the group, that would be one way
of approaching it. Because I’m not —
personally, I’m not concerned in this particular situation. I think there’s going to be
good decisions anyway, but…>>I would like to know
the mission of this group. Aren’t we really trying to find out the facts and
what we can do? There’s no real debate
on what — but there aren’t many
options come of this.>>But let’s talk
about it this way. What I hope we’re doing is
constituting the benefits committee whose first
task is going to be deal with the Affordable Care Act.>>Right.>>But after that, we’re
going to move into…>>Okay. Okay.>>…other issues relative to our health welfare,
and benefit packages.>>Right. And I think these
types of conversations and recommendations being
made are going to be few in comparison to
the conversations about what we can do to
promote health and wellness. I think the benefits
committee talking about benefits may happen three
months before the contract gets renewed and we look at
the different plans. The other meetings that we have
and whether they’re monthly or quarterly may be,
how do we get staff to embrace the no-smoking policy
that takes effect January 1st. How do we get everybody
across the campus to get on this bandwagon
of healthy living? Those are the types of
conversations I think that the benefit committee
will also be having. So, these conversations about
representation [inaudible], we can look at other committees
and what that make up is for those types of
conversations, but I just want to put out there that there’s
more than those conversations that should be taking place
in the benefits committee.>>Okay.>>Does that make sense?>>Mm-hmm.>>Okay.>>So what other, I guess,
that would be my question, what other committees do we have where we have representation
from 14 groups? And actually, representation
from two, four, six, eight, 10 groups with…>>Well, without getting into
history that no one really wants to get into, there’s
always been the tension between shared governance,
which is academic senate, the classified senate,
the confidentials that — and the associate students
and that group, okay, which deals with governance. And then the collective
bargaining groups which represent the
rights of the employees and negotiate working
conditions and what have you. So, we try to maintain on the
shared governance side that — that line; and I think the
college council is an example of that line for the most part. But, if you look at the
college council now, some of the standing
committees, first of all, the council itself
includes representation of all those groups, right? And secondly, the standing
committees, if appropriate, include representation
of all those groups. So, if we were to look at the
model of the college council, which is a good thought,
and look at the numbers of representatives of each
group on the council and say, “That’s a model that
we could adopt here,” that might be a way
of getting to this. And the total number in the
college council is, 15, 16, 17. I mean, when they all come…>>There’s three
classified senate.>>So, there’s three
classified senate. I believe there’s…>>One union — one each
of the unions [inaudible].>>Okay. So, let’s do this. So…>>I think it’s online
somewhere.>>Oh, it is, I just
don’t remember off hand. So let’s just say that it’s
three classified senate. I think the academic
senate has three. I think these…>>This is their two students
— there’s two students.>>They went to three, I think.>>Okay.>>So, there’s nine right there, imagine association,
I believe, has two.>>Faculty…>>CSEA has one. The faculty association has one.>>The CFTU has one.>>ISSU-CFT.>>ISSU-CFT is one,
that’s right.>>There is one confidential.>>And there’s confidential
as one.>>About the [inaudible]?>>Which one?>>[Multiple speakers].>>You know — yes,
they have one. They have been there for a
while, but they have one. So, there you go. So, that’s three, six, nine,
11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16.>>Plus one for the PCC
Retirees Association.>>And then, the PCC
Retirees would be one. And then the rest of
us, so there you go. I think that’s a good idea. Whoever thought of
it, it’s a good idea. We’ll just go ahead
and use the same…>>[Multiple speakers].>>What’s the total again?>>17 roughly.>>So then there’s…>>Three, six, nine…>>…then there’s payroll
business, human resources, and business and
colleges — four more.>>Right.>>[Multiple speakers].>>[Inaudible] three students
[inaudible] committee.>>[Inaudible].>>[Inaudible] be willing to.>>But, it would also have to
be the kind of thing to know when we have a business in the meeting who’s
ever there is there and we conduct the
business meeting.>>Right. That’s why I’m
asking, so I’m talking about the end terms of
their representation because if it is only
a quarterly meeting, just making sure that they
have students who can purchase, how do we get the
students supported to be able to participate.>>So, I think just
depending on the timing of when the meetings are. Well, I get the – well,
an advanced notice that we can [inaudible].>>Okay.>>The other thing is is that,
we may schedule them quarterly as far as the meetings, but if
there’s business to be conducted in between each meeting, we
would just do that depending on what the agenda [inaudible] of the college were,
I think, right?>>Mm-hmm.>>Okay. So, is there
some general consensus that this make-up…>>Could you just go over that
real quickly, one more time?>>Yeah. Well, first
of all, in general, we’ll look at the makeup and the
numbers and the college council and we’ll confirm that
what we’re talking about here synchs up with that. But, generally speaking,
if my memory serves, we have three classified
senate representatives, three academic senate
representatives, three associated students,
two management association, one CSEA, one faculty
association, one ISSU-CFT, one confidential, one POA,
and then we’re just going to add a PCC retirees. And then, it would be the
— myself, Terry, HR, Joe, business services and Maggie for
payroll and the administration. So, it’d be roughly 21 people and this would be the
benefits committee. And we’d start with the ACA,
the Affordable Care Act, and then we would
kind of go from there. And then actually, if
you look at the 11 — the 1011 list, it kind
of synchs up, doesn’t it?>>Not with faculty though. I was looking at that.>>Is Rogers…>>Yeah, that’s it.>>Oh, [inaudible].>>[Multiple speakers].>>[Inaudible] think of
because he said there was one representative in faculty.>>Well, actually,
Charlotte Williams is faculty and — who else…>>Roger.>>…Roger.>>Oh, but he’s on there
as union, I’m guessing.>>Yeah. Well, let’s
don’t look at that…>>[Multiple speakers].>>The other thing is in
the last agreement we had, there was something about
a benefits committee and I don’t know if it said
anything about the makeup of it. So, but…>>Well, why don’t you go
ahead and we’ll take a look at [background talking]
and if there’s…>>[Multiple speakers].>>…any way.>>Yeah. And we’ll adjust but…>>Yeah. Yeah. It’s on.>>But this is — I think
this is actually pretty good.>>I think it’s on
the board year two with all the changes
coming out…>>Yeah.>>…that they have a
little more representation, or thorough representation.>>And the other thing
as Joe mentioned is, it’s not just the
Affordable Care Act. It’s not just wellness,
but it’s also looking at our benefits packages
working with Keenan and determining whether or not
those are the best package. Are we getting the bang for
the buck that we need to, or are there other
opportunities or other options that might work out better? Can the coverage be extended
beyond what it might be for the same dollar, you know? How many PPOs do we need versus
HMOs versus, you know, whatever? Every time I go get new glasses,
I wonder, “What happened?”>>Yeah.>>I still walk out there
writing a pretty big check.>>Yeah.>>…huge.>>[Multiple speakers].>>$400.>>Yeah.>>[Multiple speakers].>>Yeah. It’s like —
and so, I’m wondering about that with myself.>>Yeah. [Inaudible].>>Yeah. But anyway, so
that’s the kind of — and I don’t think any
of that has been looked at as a benefits committee
and the years probably, right?>>No. No. By the looks of that
last committee.>>Yeah [laughter].>>They’re taping
this, you know, John.>>I know.>>That’s why he’s
sitting in the back.>>Yeah.>>Okay. And then, the
anticipated topics — Joe, is there anything more you
want to talk about [inaudible]?>>No, these were just
ideas that as part of the discussion topic, just
not the — like I said earlier, it’s not going to be a
one-off conversation. There are other things
that would be taking place, and so whether it’s quarterly
or we do quarterly scheduling, but then it becomes monthly
because there are other things that are coming up, just topics
for discussion, [inaudible] them down as a brainstorming
type of thing.>>When would you
anticipate the first meeting with Keenan to take place? Or a briefing meeting, that maybe we pull the
group together first just to brief them on the
Affordable Care Act.>>We have had our initial
conversation with Keenan to find out what type of
information they need. We’re going to provide them
with a sample to make sure that that’s what they’re looking for that they can
use for the analysis. I was hoping that we would
be able to get the analysis and the study back
and that would be one of the first meetings of
the benefits committee, so we could see what the
gaps are if anything.>>But still within the realm of possibilities
type, but it’s there.>>So, I would say
six to eight weeks out before we have
that study back.>>Okay. Would it be
worthwhile to get together three or four weeks from now and
just get the ACA overview and get the group
grounded and what…>>Sure.>>…this topic is?>>Sure, yeah.>>And then even explain to them
what the study is going to do in terms of, you know,
what are the first types of decisions a group
needs to make?>>I think that for
the most part, I think it would be worthwhile because the decisions are
a lot further down the road than a much greater
grasp of understanding.>>Okay.>>But, the rules are changing so much there’s been
fluctuation, then, you know, notifying the individuals
of what their requirements and possibilities are versus
employee-employer options and requirements —
so much changing.>>So, what we’ll…>>And correct me if I’m wrong,
but ACA takes effect January 1, 2014, but it’s dependent
on the…>>Enrollment.>>…the enrollment,
which is October.>>So, the open enrollment
period right — is right now, not
for the district. So, employers have actually
been given an extra year. So 2015 are our requirements,
but the individual, each person in the country
should be looking at that and registering, and enrolling
and saying, “Does it affect me and what are my options
as an individual?” They — their coverage
would start January 1, 2014.>>But, I think it’s
important, say, because we’ve all been listening
to the radio and maybe reading about this a little bit, is that
those people who are covered, like all of us in this room,
if we didn’t do anything, we’re absolutely fine.>>Right.>>That there’s nothing
that’s going to happen to us. Okay? If everybody who doesn’t
have coverage, 17% of Americans, is that what that number — I
remember some percentage, but — that are racing to the
cooperatives right now or whatever they’re called, to
try to take advantage of it. The biggest issue for us
is, what are we required to do now based upon
that analysis? And then, there’s another thing,
the so-called Cadillac tax that we’re going to kind of
have to come to grips with, which is supposedly within
the depths of this act is for those organizations that have really high
quality insurance of which most public employees
are deemed to have that.>>And as the current
regulations, we’re nowhere near it.>>We’re okay?>>Yeah.>>Oh, okay [inaudible].>>But, again, that’s part
of educating this group to see, that’s a huge issue.>>People — well, yeah, they
could fix eight months ago — remember, we [inaudible] at the [inaudible]
business office [inaudible], there was great concern
for everybody in that room that every public employee had
so-called Cadillac and was going to have to pay significant
fines because the quality of what you’re providing
is more, but now you’re saying
that’s not the case.>>We have good insurance here. We have more doctors as we have
really good insurance, but, you know, the fact is it is
based on dollar value and one of the things again
with this district, we all have the same coverage. We all have the options with
the same coverage’s, so they’re, you know — again,
going back to letting that group know,
that’s important…>>So, one more reason
— exactly, as you said, one more reason why it
would be really good to get this briefing
[inaudible]. Now, so let’s just say
we’re going to try to do that next three or four
weeks, which means — can I ask that everybody who’s
here representing a group, go back to your groups
and figure out who your designees
are going to be.>>And if they can email
me so I can just…>>We’ll put a roster together.>>And we can put it on everyone’s calendar
and go from there.>>And go from there.>>Yeah.>>So, what we’ll do — yes?>>That’s said to be
clear, we’re asking for academic senate
to propose trainings.>>Trainings and the
faculty association, one; classified senate, three;
management, two; CSEA, one; ISSU-CFT trial would be one. I don’t think there’s anybody
here from confidential, so we’ll have to fill them in.>>I’m confidential.>>Are you?>>[Laughter] Yes,
and I’m yours.>>[Multiple speakers].>>I am part of that.>>Man. Okay. I’m going to have to treat you
a little different [inaudible].>>When do we — when is the —
when do they get the meetings?>>[Inaudible].>>If — I don’t…>>Yeah.>>If they could do it within the next two
weeks, that would be great. I don’t know how
long it usually…>>So, you automatically
[inaudible].>>No.>>[Multiple speakers].>>[Inaudible] time doing that
but we can do it in a month.>>Probably a month.>>But we would’ve had…>>[Multiple speakers].>>You don’t know how many…>>…earlier today.>>[Multiple speakers].>>Okay. So a month is good and
then I’ll just get an overview for a month and a week.>>[Inaudible] part of that.>>But we are all confidential.>>Even executive assistants?>>Exactly. We are the only ones
that are going to be. Yeah.>>Okay.>>We’ll have to talk?>>We will [laughter].>>In any event — okay. Good. Okay. So, have we beaten this one
under the ground enough yet?>>Yeah.>>Yeah, I think so.>>[Inaudible].>>[Multiple speakers].>>I was hoping for
five minutes. That was 35 minutes
and I’m good with it.>>Okay. Well, but
it’s important that everybody really
understands what this is.>>Yeah. But I do think the
overview from Keenan Associates in a month — five weeks
would be really helpful.>>Okay, very good.>>So at least five
weeks because [inaudible] because they have to present
the names, and they have to discuss it, and
then vote on it. So, it’s probably
going to take a good…>>It would take a month but
I’m emailing Eduardo [assumed spelling] right now.>>Yes.>>So, if he can send
out an email next week so that they can
put on it at the — at their meeting on the
21st, it’s all laid out. So, hopefully, they’ll be
able to get it by then.>>Great.>>Okay.>>Thank you, guys. All right. So, that’s — so it sounds
like five or six weeks out is probably the
best time to do that.>>Well, is there any
kind of a definition of what the benefits committee
is or is that changed now? Or, could you send that to
us, Joe, so that when we go out to our potential
reps, we can say, “This is what you’ll
be dealing with.”>>Yeah. Maggie and I
will go back and look at the benefits finders that
the district had in the past, and kind of resurrect, and if
we need to, we can bring it back to the committee and say,
“Is this still applicable or do we need to
look at it again?” But, we can send out.>>Another thing, but there’s
also been discussion from Keenan on what their professional
suggestion is, something [inaudible] to.>>Good. Okay.>>Good. So, basically, between
Maggie and Joe and Terry, they’ll get their heads
together and put this together, just kind of a joint HR payroll
and business services thing. Okay. Joe…>>Yes?>>…you’re on again.>>Okay. I’m on with…>>Item five.>>Item five. So, we are looking at the
budget process for the district and how previously it was
kind of a rollover budget because of the economy
and what was happening. I have for the last few months
been looking at processes that are in place,
but are kind of — they’re those unwritten
processes. So, what I’m looking at, it’s
taking those processes on how to request funds and
allocate positions, request for renovations
to sites and putting them into a written document
and process. So, we are looking at developing
a calendar for a budget process that hopefully we can put
forth for fiscal year ’14, ’15 developing trainings,
kind of coming up with how the areas would
request their materials, or supplies, or new staffing, or
new renovations, and we will lay that out to this group — or at least a model to this
group in the near future. But it is starting
to be thought about. We want to move away from the
status quo rollover budget into a more developed budget
that is developed by the units, so they know what they have to
spend and what they can spend and what — and that they can
plan for any future projects that we’re working on.>>Okay.>>Okay.>>So, it — Cindy sent out an
email just before this meeting, if I remember correctly,
from Matt Jordan. And they now had to do with the
joint meeting of the planning and priorities group, or
— I’m trying to find it. Do you have your phone? I just — I sent it to you,
[inaudible] in your phone?>>No, I don’t have
any other person…>>Here, I’ll look.>>Okay.>>I remember the BRAC committee
would have gotten then.>>Yeah.>>So, [inaudible]
can you pull that up?>>Which one?>>It was an invitation
for doodle for the…>>Oh, right. So, it’s for the 18th.>>Okay. And what did…>>…planning.>>It’s the second
integrated planning meetings, so that was the planning meeting
that we had spring last year. This is the second portion,
so for those of you who got to attend to it, it was where
the big three governing bodies on campus got together to
talk about holistic planning to set our agendas for
the last — for this year.>>So, it was BRAC
planning and…>>BRAC.>>…priorities committee, or
the institutional effectiveness?>>All three.>>Okay.>>Okay. There it
is right there. I think that’s right. Are you trying to — I
want to find it inside because I forwarded
it off to you, Cindy, so I think it was sent to you.>>Carol forwarded
that, too, as well. Thank you.>>And let’s see if
they will download. Anyway, the point is is
that there’s two things that we’re going
to be engaged in. One is the actual mechanics
of building the budget which is kind of what Joe
was referring to there; and those mechanics are going to
be different on a lot of levels, including working
with [inaudible] in our new budget
development scenario. And then certainly trying
to build budgets now that are based upon
needs as identified by our educational master plan,
as identified by the board of trustees, goals and what have
you, and trying to make sure that we provide resources
to support those things, as well as, to provide resources
to support things that come out of the institutional
effectiveness committee, and the program review
activities that are taking place. So, I think part of what
— there it is right there. The next thing is
talking about, he says, “Next integrated
planning study session. BRAC committee, please
see the message below. “Hi. Hello, everyone. You are receiving
this invitation because you currently serve on
one of the committees related to integrated planning. So it’s integrated planning. “BRAC planning, and priorities
and institutional effectiveness. We met last spring to evaluate
our current integrated planning process so that we can
strengthen its alignment to accreditation standards,
and most importantly so that we can ensure we have
a transparent cyclic process for program review improvement
plans and resource allocations. At this meeting, we agreed that
we would need to meet again and continue the
conversation and collaboration.” So, basically what
this is, is the linking of planning with budgeting. And as a budget resource
allocation committee, we have to try to make
sure that in our process, we are fulfilling the
needs that are identified to the planning process as best
as we can, recognizing that 90% of every dollar are those that
are sitting around the table. And so, we’re really
allocating 10% for everything from the electricity to,
you know, supplies to, you know, to feed the chem. Labs and pay the
student assistants and all the things
we have to do. So, it’s a challenge. So, as we did last
year, the last part of what we did last year
was we came up with a list, priorities that we established
through a variety of ways. And in fact, this year’s ’13, ’14 budget reflected an
allocation of funding and support of a lot
of the priorities that this group identified the
top 10 or so as I recalled. So, the process that Joe
described is a process that mechanically will help us
get to where we need to get to, to support this integrated
planning thing. So, we would encourage all of
us to try to make that meeting and participate because, again,
it’s the three committees of BRAC, planning of
priorities; and the IEC — Institutional Effectiveness
Committee, which is now — which is chaired by Matt now, because Cynthia Olivo was kind
enough to get it kick started and off the ground, and now
Matt Jordan as our interim dean for — Associate Dean for General Application
Program Review is chairing that committee. So, it’s all sort of related. So, I would imagine four weeks
from now at our next meeting — roughly four weeks — we’ll — Joe will bring in some more
template kind of things and begin to kind of lay out mechanically what
we’re talking about, and then we won’t
have this meeting.>>And that this meeting will be
on the 18th between this meeting and our next BRAC
meeting, and — you’ll be one of the
presenters at that or will you in attendance to — at
the meeting on the 18th?>>Yes.>>Good.>>Okay.>>Yeah.>>Okay. So, there we go. Anything else on
this topic, folks? We’re kind of try to get
better what we’re doing here.>>And let me just clarify. Up until a second
ago I was attending, but now that we’re having this
conversation, I may need to talk with Matt about presenting.>>Yeah, I agree [laughter].>>Thanks, John.>>Okay.>>Oh yeah.>>…vote for you.>>Yeah.>>Yeah. And if nothing
— and if they’re not — if you’re not presenting,
then at least we want to coordinate all
of the activities, which is what [inaudible] help
start last year [inaudible].>>Is it going to be recorded?>>It sounds like we should. What do you think?>>I think we should just because I haven’t
[inaudible] for the weekends. I mean, on a conference I’m
going to, so unfortunately…>>Okay. Okay. So we can make a note
of that, have it — see if we can get recorded. We can talk to Matt and make
— if Matt’s okay with that, but I don’t see why
he wouldn’t be.>>Yeah.>>You’re looking
pensive and thoughtful.>>It’s interactive the
last planning sessions, so I don’t know if you
watching us doing a bunch of activities is really
helpful [laughter].>>Well, the presentations
anyway maybe. I mean…>>The presentations were
meant to be interactive like it was really done
with a good pedagogy. It’s not this style of meeting. It’s like a working meeting.>>I see.>>So, if there’s
any way that you…>>You’re saying I
have lousy meetings, Panella [assumed spelling], is that what you’re
saying [laughter].>>I think that [inaudible]
procedure leads towards frustrating experiences. This — so, it’s a little
bit more interactive because the idea
is that we’re…>>[Multiple speakers]
[laughter].>>You answered “Yes.”>>[Multiple speakers].>>Yes.>>It’s not you,
it’s the process.>>I see.>>[Multiple speakers].>>All right, so. So, if you can make it though,
it was really good for everybody because everybody gets to
see the interconnected parts that they don’t participate
with.>>Okay.>>So, you may have
to reschedule.>>Okay. So, I’ll
leave it to you guys to decide that, but good. Excellent. Good! Okay. Joe, Maggie anything else you
guys want to throw in right now?>>We had a — or that
the governor signed in to lobby increase of the
minimum wage, so we just kind of wanted to bring that up, and talk about how it could
potentially impact those on the budget.>>Couple of that way,
a couple of this way. This is just a — the blur —
we know that as of July 1, 2014, minimum wage in the
state of California goes up to $9 an hour
and up to $10…>>To make sure [inaudible].>>Up to $10 on January 1, 2016. I did a rough calculation. I received how many
number of hours we had. Over the next couple of years
we could see upwards of — by the time it gets to
the 2016, it could — we could see upwards of 1.3 million increase
for just that group. There are certain instances
that this doesn’t discuss where an employer such
as ourselves can pay less than minimum wage which
we’ve never explored. So, that’s where we are.>>So, just to reinforce that there was a lot
that was signed in.>>There was a lot of
assigned done, AB-10, Governor Brown passed that one
and it’s going to be graduated.>>So, for — based on the
current workforce that we have, when somebody’s making less than
$9 an hour, the potential impact for that fiscal year which would
be ’14, ’15 is about $150,000 if we continue with the
same temporary workforce that we have now. In fiscal year ’15, ’16, if
we continued on the same path that we have now, there
is the potential increase of a seven-figure amount in additional salaries
to the college.>>Ouch!>>Why does it jump so
much the second year?>>Because that’s where it
hits from the nine to 10 and we’ve got a lot larger
group in that number. So, when it goes from eight
to nine, we don’t really have that many people that
are in $8 an hour. We have most — more often our
student workers specifically, but some college
assistants, you know, and some of our grant programs
with the federal work study and California work study
are both at $9 an hour. They’re base. So, those increase
substantially.>>So, to bring it up
because this is the BRAC, these are things that we need
to keep in mind when we start to forecast the budget out
and think about what it is that we can do and how we can do
it, what programs we need to put in place, what the
workforce looks like. And it all kind of feeds back
into the Affordable Care Act as well, so we don’t
need to scare anybody, but this is just the reality that we’re going to
have to deal with.>>And I think it
would be good to kind of have what you said
verbally on paper to show us what the
impact the dollar…>>You mean, share it on
paper versus the [inaudible].>>Yeah, share it on paper.>>We’ll do something.>>A chart or whatever
you want to do. Even on a graph that
shows the dramatic impact.>>And, again, you know, one of
the things I commented on was, you know, there’s the possible
over the $9 an hour bid — over the $10 an hour bid
there’s possible fallout of the other non-required
increases would happen as well. That’s something that’s
not really quantifiable at this point. The other thing is…>>What’s the non-required
increase?>>So, for instance, somebody
who’s now at $10 an hour, we’re now harder to raise them
but now is there going to be, you know — it’s very
likely that, you know, the consensus is, well, now
we need to bring them up so that they’re not at
the bottom anymore. But, that might exist,
so we’re not bare minimum as what we’re talking about
is the 1.3-million increase, it could be more.>>1.3 million, and
what did that represent?>>That represents the people
who are making $9 an hour and then when the minimum wage
gets raised to $10 an hour because there’s a larger pool
of people making $9 an hour, the increase is going to
be about a million one. And so the million three
over the two-year period is from increasing people
who are making $8 an hour to the $9 minimum…>>That’s the 150,000?>>Yeah. And then the
following year, raising people who are making $9 an
hour to $10 an hour, to meet the minimum wage.>>And that is where…>>[Multiple speakers].>>So that’s the other
$1.1 million comes from?>>And you get — yeah. And, again, one of the things that this organization
specifically hasn’t explored and may not want to
— but it’s an option, is that there are
certain circumstances where you can pay less
than minimum wage.>>Are those all
[inaudible] dollars?>>No.>>Okay. So, that’s an
interesting point, too, that — so, the [inaudible] dollars
or district dollars versus, you said federal
work study dollars?>>Work study [inaudible].>>So what the 1.5 million, what
actually impacts the 01 budget?>>And we can put
that on chart for you.>>Do you have any rough idea?>>I did not look
at it, but well, we know 75% is going
to be [inaudible]. So, of that, but how much of
that number are work studies…>>Yeah. So this would be all
good information for us to have because then we can really
determine how it’s going to deck our local budget. But eventually, they’ll
impact the feds because they’re not
going to be able to necessarily kick
in all those dollars. It’ll impact those that are
managing the fund, 03 dollars. They won’t be able
to provide as many — you know, as I don’t
think Washington’s going to write a check to make
up California’s largest.>>Well, I…>>Right?>>…I think from a
— I was about to ask, and not necessarily a
follow-up question…>>You might.>>…for you, but the
overlapping moment, too, is for our student’s
financial aid…>>Yeah.>>…[background talking]
is going to impact.>>Because they get
a flat dollar — they get X number of
dollars, well now, we’re chipping into
that a lot more.>>Right.>>Right.>>So, we need to look at the
impact on our student workers and their success, right?>>That part is still
two years out, or January of ’16,
but it’s, you know…>>So when I — Joe, go ahead.>>So, again, I just
want to bring it back to that this is the group
that’s going to be looking at. What I’m hoping to do is
bring in the information so we can forecast beyond just
the current year and the next.>>And what I would love to do is again do another
informational session and invite people like Dr.
Semien [assumed spelling] and Kim and Dave and anybody
— any student services, grant managers, anybody who is
paying now, college assistant and student assistant wages,
using all the different funds that we funded through whether
it’s Pell Grant, you know, all these things, the
foundation, anybody in here and that — and we need to do
kind of informational overview as to the impact of
this, because it’s going to have major programmatic
issues, I think.>>Right.>>Because we might be
able to decide, yes, our district is going to kick
another 300,000 [inaudible] a year because that’s what it’s
going to cost us locally. But the feds may not have
the same plans in mind.>>Well, the other thing is if
it limits the number of hours that we’re going to get
out of a student worker, of their limited X number of
dollars that feeds in to this, this many hours,
and then you got — again, you got that cut off.>>Right.>>[Inaudible] amounts have
not changed dramatically over the years. I still have to tell you since
I [inaudible] around 1990. I mean, the — we offer a
student in the neighborhood of $3000 or $4000, way back
when the rate was 4.29 now where it wasn’t that
much of a deal. So now, I mean, you add
another hour to it — or another dollar to the hour,
it’s going to impact John because he’s going
to have students that how far fewer
hours to work.>>To work for you.>>We’ve got a time when we
have an increased demand.>>Right.>>Yeah.>>No, I think we’re…>>[Inaudible] on their
financial aid eligibility because that one is not counted against [inaudible] it’s not
included in the calculation for their eligibility, but…>>”Unfunded mandates,” I
think is what they call it.>>Right.>>On the one hand,
they’re trying to help people pay
more of a living wage. On the other hand, they didn’t
fund it on the back end, so in effect, it’s going to
reduce the number of hours, many people get to work — at least in our environment,
in our world.>>All right. And if the feds aren’t
changing their minimum wage requirement…>>Right. Right. That’s where the
problem’s going to be. I think the governor will
increase our budget accordingly. I just think he’ll be
responsible in California. But the feds is where
we’re going to shrink.>>Right. So, I think we do
need when you do a presentation, we do need to kind of see what
the options are for opting out if in fact there
are options to opt out.>>There are certain regulations
whether it’s the learner rate, the first 160 hours,
I believe it is. You could pay at 85%. If an employer is — employees
less than X number of percentage of employees under 18,
anybody under 18 you can pay under — you can pay at 85%. You know, it’s not a huge
savings either, and do we want to be the group that’s
doing that.>>So, circling back,
this is a BRAC discussion.>>I mean, I can bring those
things forward as well. I can bring those comments
of the options that, again, the group would —
can say, “Yes. We want to do that,”
and “No, we don’t.”>>The attitude’s there.>>Well, but I think we need to take all the facts
and information. But, then I do think we have to
kind of have a little mini-forum and invite everybody, or at
least every project director or [inaudible] manager,
what have you, that’s going to be impacted by this decision.>>Particularly grants is
going to be a big deal.>>A big deal for grants, yeah.>>Yep.>>All right. So, we have some time
for that conversation. I’m probably looking at
maybe January or February to bring everyone together.>>And when is this
is going to affect?>>July 1st of 2014
and that’s going to be the smaller of the impact. That’s going to bring us
from $8 to $9, which, again, does not affect — if you look
at the entire year of ’12, ’13, that was 15,000 hours…>>Okay.>>…which is not a lot.>>So this is actually — it
looks like 16, it says, in 2016.>>January of 2016 is the
largest of the impact. That’s the one where we’re
really need to be concerned. And, of course, being
that we’re — we want to look at that probably by January 20 —
or, by June of 2015.>>Right. Okay. So, we’ll — I think
January is fine.>>Okay.>>Okay. Good! All right. Thank you. Any other handy-dandy
little surprises that you’ve got to
brighten our day?>>Not from us.>>Not from you. Okay. So, what I have
here is just handouts and I’m not going
to go over them all. What I’ll do is that as
I collect these things, and see these things,
I make them available through the college update
because newsletter services — school services at
California provides some pretty good information. What this is saying, August, things are looking
up and stable. The next one is an article
that talks about the ACA, the Affordable Care Act
and its revision to that. And this actually gives
you a pretty good primer of what’s going on with the ACA. And then, UCLA economists see
a return in normal [inaudible], whatever that is, but basically
bringing California back to the manner in which it
did business so to speak, economically, the California
economy, what’s going on. And that has also speaks a
little bit to international as what — national,
international trend. It talks about quantitatives
and all those exciting things. School bond a kind of builder’s
requirements, we’ve actually — we were looking at that
very carefully in relation to our measured peak, bond,
funds and I’m very happy to say that we’re one of the few public
higher education [inaudible] entities ever actually doing
this correctly in terms of our reporting and the
things that we needed to do. So, that’s just FYI. Then I — this goes back a few
weeks, but this basically — this last thing has
to do with them. The fall enrollments —
the second last thing — the fall enrollments
system wide in the fall. And basically, if I’m trying to
scan this just to remember this, but I think the system
increased on average 2.5%. So the median percentage
increase enrollment projected at [inaudible] is 2.5% and
colleges reported a 5% increase in the number of course
sections offered, et cetera. We exceeded all of that, which
is good for us, and the opening of the [inaudible] is going
to help us that much more. So, we’re pleased with
where we are at the moment from an FTS point of view
and a number of sections that were offering perspectives. So, that’s pretty much it. Is there anything else
that anybody wants to discuss, future agenda items? We’ve talked about the
Affordable Care Act, basically the overview session. Then we talked about
getting together — would meet the Keenan when
they’re done with their study. And then we talked about the —
attending the combined meeting with the planning group
and the institutional effectiveness group. And then we talked
about a session tied to the information regarding that governor’s increase
in minimum wage. Any other agenda —
and then, of course, the budget development, so… Okay.>>I don’t have agenda items
but I just have a couple of questions about just
a couple of documents that I was trying to find.>>Okay.>>So, I haven’t seen one
of these and I don’t know, maybe you guys don’t
do it anymore, but the operating
budget, one for 2012, ’13, I have one from last
year but I wanted to see one from this year. I didn’t see from that packet,
yeah, the one looks like this. You guys still do one like this?>>We do and we just didn’t
provide it this time but we can.>>Okay. I mean, you can just
email to me or whatever, I mean.>>Yeah.>>So, Cindy…>>[Multiple speakers].>>…it’s the operating
statement.>>Yeah, well…>>[Multiple speakers].>>…fiscal year like…>>I won’t have that
until Marie does that.>>Because she physically
does that.>>Yeah, but she’s done it.>>Yeah, and if she’s
done it, but we don’t — I don’t think she’s
done the final.>>But she’s [inaudible] yeah,
for ’13, ’14, [inaudible].>>She’s not here tomorrow.>>But she’s here right now.>>Okay.>>Yeah. [Inaudible].>>I don’t need the
second, I mean…>>Well, she’s going to be gone for two weeks [inaudible]
[laughter].>>I was just — because at
some point I’d love to see one. That’s…>>We’re letting her
go for 13 days to — on a cruise to [inaudible] and
I promised [background talking] so it’s a nice thing for her.>>Okay. Okay.>>Anyway, I think
that’s done [inaudible].>>There’s a second
thing that you — they used to have it online,
it was like a 10 page — it said “budget summary.” And I could try to
— I couldn’t find. I was in a hurry today,
I couldn’t find — it was usually about 10 pages.>>It’s in the board packet. That was — it was nine pages.>>September.>>Okay.>>It was in that board packet?>>I’ll look at that.>>It’s actually also from the
[inaudible] budget website.>>Yeah.>>It’s on where? I’m sorry.>>The budget website. Actually, I’ll send you
a direct like to it.>>Perfect. Thank you.>>Okay.>>[Inaudible] thanks. And then the last thing, in none
of these reports that I can tell but again, maybe
you can correct me. They have academic salaries
but they never separate out. We talked about doing this
a couple of years ago. They never separate
out administration from teaching faculty. It’s academic salaries all
together, and I didn’t know if there’s a way that we
could separate out the…>>Certificated management
salaries?>>…certificated versus — yeah, certificated
management salaries. And maybe there is a
document that has it. I just been looking
and I can’t, so…>>Yeah. Yeah. I think if you look in that
nine-page budget document…>>Like it’s in there?>>…I think it’s in there.>>I’ll check that.>>Can I see that for a second?>>This one?>>Yeah.>>That was one I think
from ’11, ’12 or something. I just grabbed one
sample of one that I had.>>Yeah. This is
non-teaching certificated…>>That’s…>>…that’s library
and for councilors.>>…considered — no, no. I’m not talking about — I’m
talking about administration.>>Well, academic
monthly is faculty. Non-teaching certificated
is going to be, I believe…>>I think that’s
library and councilors, but that’s not administrator. So…>>And do you think it’s…>>Academic salaries
includes management back — like deans and all
that kind of stuff. And what I was asking
is, there’s a way. We talked about it a
couple of years ago…>>Because classified
supervision…>>[Multiple speakers].>>I know. They separated out, right, but
they never do for academics.>>And not the ones with the M.>>Right. I do think it’s
part of the nine-page summary.>>I know…>>I know it is.>>I know. I know it’s in there.>>[Multiple speakers].>>Okay. I’ll look at that and
if I can’t find it, I’ll…>>And what we’ll do is,
we’ll give you answers to academic monthly
and non-teachings. The non-teaching certificate, it may include the certificated
managers, as well as councilors and librarians, but we’ll…>>Well, if it does, I’d
like to get the managers…>>But it may not either because
— anyway, we’ll figure it out. But we can — I’m…>>Anyway…>>We can provide
that information.>>Perfect. Thank you so much.>>You’re welcome. Okay. Anything else
for the group?>>With the integrated
planning being on the 18th and we have a BRAC
set for October 24th, do we want to cancel the one
for October 24th and just move for the one in November 21st?>>I don’t think so. I think [inaudible].>>So, we’ll be meeting
three times this month?>>That’s okay.>>Okay.>>[Inaudible] [laughter].>>We — I mean, we’re
likely to come away from the 18th with homework.>>Okay.>>I thought you [inaudible]
say with a headache?>>[Inaudible] all
that [inaudible].>>Okay. Okay, [inaudible]. Cathy swallowed the canary.>>It’s likely [inaudible].>>Okay. So, we’ll hold
the meeting for the 24th. For now, the 21st and the
19th for the next three. What we’ll do if it’s okay
with everybody, I’ll ask Cindy to kind of project out
these meeting dates for the [inaudible].>>That would be great.>>Okay. So, we’ll put them
on the calendar all the way through the end of
this academic year.>>That’s actually also on the
BRAC website, the full schedule and they were all given one
in the beginning in July.>>Yeah.>>It’s okay. [Inaudible] [laughter]
everybody [inaudible].>>[Inaudible] invite
so they can — we can just all accept it.>>Yes.>>[Inaudible] calendars.>>Well, actually, [inaudible]
asked me to stop doing that because they left and they
didn’t want any more invites, so I had to cancel
and they got it that they cancelled the meeting.>>Okay. [Inaudible]…>>Can’t everyone [laughter].>>Motion to adjourn.>>I motion.>>Okay, I second. All those in favor, get
up and say “Good-bye.”>>Aye.>>Good-bye.

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