Dr. Rosyln Banks Jackson, OBGYN TV 35 Interview

Dr. Rosyln Banks Jackson, OBGYN TV 35 Interview


– Hi, I’m Chuck Harwell, Community Bank of Dublin, Laurens County. Stop by and see us today for a car loan, a boat loan, vacation loan, any type consumer loan you may need. You can get your answer today, not two days, three days from now, by local lenders involved
in the community. Community Bank of Dublin, Laurens County, servin’ Dublin for over 12 years. (upbeat music) hello ladies and gentlemen, and welcome to Real Talk here on TV 35. I’m your host Pat Brock and we’re featuring a very special lady we’ve got in the studio with us, Dr. Roslyn Banks Jackson. How are you? – I’m good, how are you? – Doin’ well, great to see you. – Thank you. – Now this is a perfect opportunity for you to meet Dr. Banks Jackson in a way where we women
normally, you know, a lot of times, you know, you get us in so many
different positions as ladies, no pun intended, but this
is now for the community to really get to know you. So share with us a little bit about you and your family and
your journey, if you would. – Okay, well I’ve been practicing OB/GYN for about 16 years. I’m married, I have two daughters, they are 16 and 19 and I
joined Dr. Chism last year and it’s just been an amazing
thing to work with him, he’s a really awesome person. I love Fairview Park Hospital. They’ve got a really
sharp nursing staff there, they’ve got a very solid unit. It’s a wonderful place to have a baby. – Yes. – And I’m just really excited
about where I am today. – That’s wonderful, and
we’re certainly excited to have you here with us. You know, we talk to
so many people, doctor, and a lot of times you wanna know what that journey has been like for you. Now were you that little girl that has always grown up wanting to be a doctor or did you kind of
change through the years through by your experiences? – Yeah, I’m a person who always wanted it. Ever since I was just like 12, 13, 14 I always wanted to know what was going on on the inside. – Right. So yeah, I think I always
wanted to be a doctor. – And you know, we like
to have a philosophy of how and why we do things. You know, what’s your foundation, as far as why you do what you do? – Well, I do what I do because I love it. – Yeah. – Like I absolutely, I
feel like it drives me. – Yeah. – I do it ’cause it’s, I mean, practicing OB/GYN, you develop very personal relationships with people very quickly and you share in really a monumental portion of their life, so that doesn’t happen that often. It’s a huge privilege, it’s
a lot of responsibility too, but, so that’s what I do. That’s why I love it. – That’s awesome. You know, when I think
about all my OB/GYNs through the years, I’ve
got three children, they’re of course 22, 19, and 18. I had such a special
relationship with them and I think that as a patient that’s something that’s
so very important to us, to be able to have that type of rapport with our physician because
it’s a very intimate you know, setting, and
sort of the circumstances that you meet us women, would you say? – Yeah. – Do you feel a type of advantage because you are female? – Sure, absolutely. – Talk to us about it. – I mean, I think, well, it’s definitely from obstetrics standpoint
’cause I’ve had children, so I think it’s, you
can’t really understand what it’s like to have a
life growing inside of you until you experience that.
– Right. – I mean I feel like you can feel that on mom’s belly but it’s, it’s, well I think women understand that that’s just something you can’t really understand it
’til it happens to you and it happens very early. Like it’s not like at
the end of the pregnancy, it happens very early. There’s this whole kind of thing going on and so I think, I do think that helps me to understand my patients a
little bit better sometimes. So there’s some advantages
there from that, and then I think from gynecology, the standpoint of just
dealing with women’s issues. There’s a little bit of advantage, you know, my male
counterparts are wonderful. They established that environment so that they’re free to speak. – Right. And I think for females, I remember when my first time having to go to an OB/GYN I was like this. Like just so terrified. Do you see that a lot in the younger girls when they first start out? – We do, yeah, and everyone’s first visit is a little bit different, so it really depends on when you present. – Right. – And so, but these days when you, we really try hard, I think our college is really trying to set forth goals so that we can make this
a lot more comfortable and just really let young women know that this is, you know, this is the type of relationship that you wanna establish for the rest of your life. – You’re absolutely right and I think that for being in the military we had to move quite a bit and so I had one child
born in Milledgeville, two children born in Kansas, and so I had to continue to establish relationships with my physicians and some I matched with, some I didn’t gel with quite so, but I loved the fact that they would all kind of make sure that I was comfortable. What do you do to put
your patients at ease? – Well, I really just try to talk to them and go over what, you know, what I think is gonna happen at this visit and then just figure out
why did you wanna come? You know, why did you come today? What do you need to get from this visit? Am I gonna meet all of your needs today? So I try to discuss that with them to make sure that they’ll feel comfortable talking about whatever it is
that they wanna talk about. And then, you know, for people who just have that terrified kind
of deer in headlights, you know, like when I shake your hand and your palm is like super sweaty. – This is gonna be uncomfortable. – I’m kind of like are you feeling a little uncomfortable today? – Right, right. – It’s like it’s okay,
we all go through this. And then I usually just try to hone in and just see is there one particular thing that’s making you uncomfortable or is it just, I mean, it’s enough that you’re meeting a new doctor and that you’re gonna
be a little bit exposed, and just kind of going over that with them and just, you know, outlining
what the exam is like, making sure that there
won’t be any surprises. Usually it helps. – Yeah, and you know, I
was thinkin’ in terms of I have an 18 year old daughter, you know, and she hasn’t started yet, but I know she’s gonna have to and so tell the people
out there about the timing as far as when we should
have our daughters to start coming to an OB/GYN and talk us through that. – So I think there’s
a lot of room for that like depending, to decide about that. So I think probably maybe
the more popular thing is when people are considering becoming sexually active or becoming sexually active is kind of when oftentimes when they present. – Right. – By age 21 we recommend that everyone come and have an OB/GYN exam
so at least by that time. And then there’s, you
know, some recommendations from our college for your
first reproductive visit between the ages 13 and 15
and that may very well be, for a lot of people that’s gonna be probably with their pediatrician or their family practice doctor, just discussing you know, that you will have a
period, that that’s normal, that that signifies you’re entering a new stage of your life or you’re going through puberty or you know, so that type of a thing. And then when people have period problems a lot of times I will see them you know, a bit earlier. So it really kind of depends on what you’re looking for. Sometimes I see younger people with their parents and they just want me to talk to them about the changes that are going on in their body and how to do that and I’m
more than happy to do that. – Do you find yourself
in your job description havin’ to be a counselor in many ways? – Sure, absolutely, yeah. – Help talk us off the ledge, I mean it’s, and you know, it’s a very delicate subject anyway that we’re talking about and we’re gonna talk more in just a moment. We’re gonna take a break, all right? We’ll be back in just a moment, ladies and gentlemen,
with Dr. Banks Jackson. – Hey Brad, you’re workin’ on a song about planning for retirement, right? – Yeah. – I wrote you some lyrics. – You’re writing now? – Mm hmm. ♪ Here’s a man like you and me ♪ ♪ Retired after 18 years at QB ♪ Kind of seems like it might be about you. – Which part? – All of it. – It’s about retirement planning. I don’t see it, Brad. ♪ Nationwide is on your side ♪ – [Announcer] Ready for some good bar-b-q? Come on by Southern Heritage BBQ. 2276 Veterans Boulevard. Home cooked southern BBQ served fast. Want a killer deal? Sandwich, chips, and drink just $4.50. BBQ by the pound, mouthwatering ribs or delicious Brunswick stew, all at Southern Heritage BBQ. 2276 Veterans Boulevard. For those special orders call ahead. 275-4304. And check out our new banquet room. Southern Heritage BBQ, Dublin. – We’re back, ladies and gentlemen, with Dr. Roslyn Banks Jackson and having some very interesting conversations with her. Doc, I kind of wanna continue on about what we were talkin’ about when you’re talkin’ about the ages of these young ladies that should come in. Do you find it different with time as far as when young ladies actually start their menstrual cycle? I’ve seen, when I was younger, you know, I was in high school, but then you see girls
now very young in age. Is there any science to that? – Yeah, we think it’s based on nutritional factors and
mostly nutritional factors, so yes, the average age is similar though, it’s 12 to 13 but I definitely have had, I definitely know people who have cycles as early as 10, actually a lot of people who have cycles as early as 10. – The youngest I heard was eight years old for someone in my family. – So that’s very early. – And as a mother you’re like– – ‘Cause that’s a child. – Correct, correct.
– Yeah. – But that’s still something that happens, that’s not something that– – Right. – All right, and we also wanna kind of you know, for pregnancies, I myself had high risk pregnancies and I had quite a few complications and so we know that in your position you have to deal with a lot of different cases that are not just cookie cutter. – Right, there’s no
cookie cutter pregnancies. – There’s not. – There aren’t. – Yeah, there’s not,
and so we wanna kind of give some preventative things as well for women’s health. I know that you’re definitely
an advocate for that. – Absolutely. – And so talk to us about what we women need to do to make sure that at whatever age level that we’re doin’ what we need to make sure that we’re healthy and living our best life. – So I think for all Americans, but particularly for women, you know the number one killer of women is still gonna be cardiovascular disease, so I think it’s important that we try to maintain healthy diets, that we try to make sure
that we’re exercising, and really stimulating our heart muscles and keeping our cholesterol under control and trying to keep our weight within reasonable range. Those are really the things that are gonna give you kind of longer
term health issues. And then, depending on
your age for screening, you know, we do pap smears, of course, we recommend that people get those and have an annual exam and then ladies around age 40 should be starting to have an annual mammogram and I feel like that, one out of every eight women is going to have breast cancer, so it’s not just people who have strong family history– – Right, I was gonna ask you that. – It’s like if you have breasts you have that, you know,
the possibility is there, so why not get a screening test for that and you know, we know early detection really increases your options and is very favorable for you and we’re doing a really good job with breast cancer these days so I strongly encourage my patients to get an annual mammogram. – And I do as well. Fairview Park is wonderful, actually, my sister, she’s passed away, but Lizzie diagnosed her, she
found a lump in her breast, and any time I go for my mammogram, Lizzie’s retired now, but I always wanna squeeze her and thank her and thank the other ladies for just the professionalism and the care that they give for us
because with all of this women’s health we’re all so
very sensitive about that, with every aspect, and family history,
I’m gonna ask you this. So my mother passed away at 42 years old of a massive stroke. She had 14 children,
her first child at 14, the last child 11 months
before she passed away. – Wow. – My grandmother lived
to be 109 years old. So when you hear, and was fishing the week before she passed away, and so I’m very cognizant
of my family history and when you hear something like that what triggers do you get as a physician for someone in that
family with the women’s history the way it is from both sides? – Well that’s so radically different. – It’s so radically. – So, and there’s so few people who become centurians these days so that’s amazing. But then losing your mom in her 40s is you know, that’s– – I always think about that. – That’s concerning. It makes me curious about
what was going on there and I know you told me she had a stroke, I don’t know if she had
uncontrolled hypertension. – Right, like that’s
definitely a family history and I remember I had to
have vascular surgery from like a varicose vein. Talk to us about that because my mother, from what I was told, I was a two year old when she passed, when you see women with the spider veins and varicose veins, there’s a seriousness to that. – So yes, beyond, because that also leads to swelling and it can cause pain and then you don’t have
very good vascular return and sometimes people have, that can be like a sign
of poor circulation– – Right, right. – And venostasis or those kinds of things. – And you know, ladies and gentlemen, there are so many different questions I’m sure that you all would have and I know we wouldn’t have the time to answer that but what
are some of the questions that you get asked a lot, doctor, that would be beneficial for
us to hear the responses to? – Some of the questions, well the mammogram question is definitely something that comes up and I should just mention that, you know, one of the things that we really try to do in medicine today is we really try to individualize based on the belief system of our patient, so there may be some people who would prefer to like do mammograms
every one to two years instead of every year and if that works out best in their belief system and their risk assessment then that can be okay too, and that’s
really true of most things. We really try to listen to patients and try to meet them where they’re at. – Right. – People ask me a lot of questions about contraception,
like what really works, what are the side effects, how’s it gonna affect me in the future if I wanna have more children– – Right, right. – What’s the best method for me? And so I definitely field a lot of questions about that. – That’s definitely changed through the years, would you say? – Yes, absolutely. – I’m hearing things that
I never knew existed. – Right, well, yeah. – There’s a patch. – There is a patch, yes, there’s a patch. There’s a subdermal implant. – Oh my lord. – Yeah, there are intrauterine devices have become very popular now, they are definitely not
the IUD of the ’70s. It’s definitely a different
animal and very effective. A lot of ladies really like ’em. So yeah, we have a lot of options today for women to really sort of be in control of their reproductive health. – Right, and what about the ladies when we’re past those
years of reproduction? Because you still wanna make sure that everything is good. – Right, we absolutely,
maybe more now than ever. – Premenopausal and after, I mean. – So yeah, well, you know women can be perimenopausal for 10 years, like 10 years before they actually stop having a cycle for a full year, which is actual definition of menopause and the age of menopause
in the United States is about 51, that’s the average. – I’m close. – Just around the corner, right? – Just around the corner. – But you know, women experience menopause very differently, but I feel like everyone experiences it and I feel like you really
need to talk about it, like people have feelings
kind of behind it and then they have symptoms, some people have hot flashes, sometimes they feel like their
concentration isn’t great, I mean sometimes they feel like I’m just not myself,
what is going on here? And we have options or treatment that are both hormonal and non hormonal, so it’s kind of the same thing. We can take you where you are, figure out what your risk factors are and really help you find what’s gonna work best for you. – And that’s perfect because I think that as women, I always say women, we know our bodies. We know when something’s not quite right and I think that when we feel those things we need to come see you. – Yes, absolutely. – Any, and I’m not, you know I often, if there’s somethin’ that just doesn’t seem like it’s quite right, if it’s a little bit off kilter as we say down here in the South, I make sure that I go see my physician and ask those questions
and be very honest. – Right. – Be very honest, and
sometimes it’s difficult, I would say, to kind of
tell you certain things because of, you know. – Right, but that’s okay, I mean, that’s why we’re here, right? I’m your advocate, I am here, I’m your advocate, I’m your consultant, I’m here to get you what you need, but to do that I gotta get it out of you. (laughing) You know, I have to be
able to pull it out of you, but yeah, that’s why we’re here, and you know, everything that goes on in the office is confidential. We don’t, you know, we don’t discuss it over dinner later, we don’t
tell anyone in church, I mean, it’s just, you know. – That’s right. – It’s just between us. – When we share with
you it’s not something that you can actually see what’s going on. – Right. – We go in there, we lay it out and you all, it’s your
job to just take it on in and we appreciate you for that, we appreciate you so much for that and you know there are a lot, what about the generation where a lot of people don’t like to go to the doctor? – Right. – Some who have not had their annuals in several annuals. – Right, and so I really
wanna speak to those women, especially in this area
and in the rural South. I really wanna speak to those women because you, you know, women still develop gynecologic cancers, so
uterine cancer is very common and you need to continue to
get pap smears up to age 75, so things don’t stop because
you stopped having children or because your tubes are tied or ’cause you don’t have a period anymore. Really, there’s not, the only doctor that really does a thorough exam, a female exam, an internal exam or a good external exam is generally gonna be your OB/GYN and so you still wanna make sure that
you’re connecting with them so we can diagnose problems before they get too far along or we can prevent them from happening at all. – Very good, and this is gettin’ them to get to know you better so that they can talk it up with you. – Yeah. – We’re gonna take another break. We’ll be back, ladies and gentlemen, with Dr. Banks Jackson. – [Announcer] At Hangers
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women and making sure that they go to the doctors and you get yourself checked out, you know, to make sure everything’s
workin’, you know, whether or not they use
it or not, you know. – Yes.
– Keep talkin’. – You absolutely still need to go and I tell, you know, I
tell my moms that I see, make sure your mom has
been to see her OB/GYN in the last few years,
like it shouldn’t be 10 years, it shouldn’t be six years, it shouldn’t be five years, she needs to be coming to see her like every one to two years. – That’s right, that’s right. – So that we know that everything is okay. – And you know, because some people are stuck back in the day where I know several of my siblings were born at home and so the care was not like it is today. The state of the art
technology that you have and so many things that you can detect, and early detection is so important. – Right, exactly. – And so, I also wanna say this about people, young girls,
who are being sexually active, things that they need
to be very cognizant of. – Yeah, and you know, the incidents of sexually transmitted diseases has been on the rise and really just over the last couple of years
is really increasing kind of like 15 percent
increase in gonorrhea, 15 percent increase in
syphilis and chlamydia, just over the last few years and so we feel like some of that has to do with the younger generation really are not protecting themselves with condoms, kind of
the way we promoted that in the age of AIDS, I think, or HIV, I feel like people don’t
see that as much anymore so that whole sort of fear
has kind of gone away. I think our adolescents haven’t seen the worst of that and so they have that kind of no fear, can’t happen to me– – Right, untouchable kind of thing. Have you seen that in the teenagers? – We do, we see it in them, but you know, and honestly, we’re really seeing it
in mature people as well, so we’re talking college aged and this is, you know, untreated sexually
transmitted infections can lead to long term pelvic pain and infertility and just
really horrible things that they’ll have to deal with later on, so I really encourage people who are sexually active to get screened or to have safer sex practices. – That’s right, that’s right
for all ages, for all ages, and we want people to know
how they can reach you. Where can they find you? I mean, tell us. – So I’m at Dublin OB/GYN, we’re in Erin Park, Erin Office Park, suite number 23 and
our telephone number is 478-274-8580. – Wonderful, and how long have you been there with Dr. Chism? – Just about a year. – And how has that been for you, because you’ve transitioned, I mean you have moved all over the world and to come here to Dublin, Georgia. How has that been for
you and the relationship that you have with the
staff at Fairview Park? – So I’ve just loved it. It’s been really awesome. Dr. Chism is a wonderful
person to work with and his office has been very welcoming and the hospital’s been nice, very good. – Very nice, well we’re certainly glad to have you here. Just listening, I hope you that you were able to get some tidbits
here of information, of course learning
about Dr. Banks Jackson, but also why she does what she does and why you love what you
do, the patients, family. – I do, I just love the
interaction, I just, yeah. I love sharing those special
moments with the patients. I would say particularly my favorite, my favorite thing is you know, like maybe on a weekend where you’ve been kind of up all night and you’re on call for Friday, Saturday, and Sunday and then you just have like that special, you have a delivery where a lot of times it might be their first
child, or maybe not, it could be their fourth child, you know, it doesn’t matter but there’s the moment where you put the baby up on mom’s belly and you just watch the mom, the mom and the other family, their support person or
other family members, you watch their
interaction as they realize they just had a baby and it’s really, it’s an amazing, it is an amazing moment. – It’s, I think about
it, even mine, you know, I look at videos, i get teary
eyed now, I think because she’s getting ready to
leave for college, the baby, but I remember those
moments with my physician and with the nurses who
were absolutely outstanding. In that moment you get
to experience something that only a few can say
that they ever will. – Yeah, it’s really, it’s a huge privilege to be present for that and I love it. It’s one of those things
that just kind of drives you. – And when you think
about all of the babies you’ve delivered in your tool belt, you’ve got those notches,
do you know a number of how many you’ve delivered
throughout your career? – I really couldn’t answer that. It’s plenty, I can tell
you that, it’s plenty. – Do you ever have your patients come back with the babies and thank you when they’re in good mind and spirits? – Well–
– I say– – You know it’s a small
world and I’ve been kind of a person who’s moved around and every now and then there’ll be someone that I maybe like delivered very early on who I’ll just run into, like I’ll just run into them at some new facility and they’ll say hey, you delivered my son, my daughter, you know, they’re 10 now, they’re 12 now, here’s a pic. – How awesome is that? – That’s kind of, yeah, it’s very awesome. – I was reading some of your reviews and I tell you just to hear the ladies talk about you as a
person first and foremost, but the love and the
care, the professionalism that they received from you, it changed their lives,
it saved their lives and it brought life into the world and to read that I felt as though I had already met you, but today’s my first time meeting you and that’s pretty special. – Yeah. – Because you’re leaving a mark, you’re leaving an indention, it’s not just because you’re a physician, but it’s because of who you are internally and how that expands in what you do and how you do what you do. – Well that’s so, that’s so lovely for you to say that, but I do really feel it,
I love on my patients, I mean, you’re probably really
not supposed to do that, but I mean, you know, I do. I have heartfelt emotion for my patients. I try really hard to
get them what they need. – Yeah, and as patients we feel that. We feel the love, we feel
when you care about us, and when you don’t care about
us, you know what I mean? And so for, we’re thankful
because we’re able to feel that from you,
that you still admit that, you know you give that aura when you’re doing what you’re doing, even when you’re talking about something that’s so delicate that
could be very painful for us to hear we still know that you care and that’s important, thank you for that. – Well thank you. – Ladies and gentlemen, this right here is Dr. Roslyn Banks Jackson,
she’s a great physician at the office of Dr. Chism
at Dublin OB/GYN Associates. – Yes. – We’re glad to have you here. We’re glad to have you a part of the Fairview Park Hospital
team and if you’d like to reach Dr. Banks Jackson to be one of those new patients where
she brings life to you, here she is, here’s a face to the name and the face behind the accolades. Any last words, Dr. Banks Jackson? – No, I’m just so glad I could come in and talk to you today,
I really enjoyed it. – [Pat] It’s been such a pleasure. – The pleasure’s all mine. – This is Dr. Banks Jackson,
ladies and gentlemen, this is all the time we
have today for Real Talk here on TV 35 and please, keep watching. (upbeat music)

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