Leading Health Indicators Webinar: Access to Health Services (Part 1 of 4)

Leading Health Indicators Webinar: Access to Health Services (Part 1 of 4)


OPERATOR: Good morning and thank you for registering
to the webinar on the Leading Health Indicators. I would now like to introduce Dr. Don Wright,
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health at the Department of Health and Human Services. DR. DON WRIGHT: Thank you very much. Next
slide. Welcome to the first installment of the monthly series, Who’s Leading the Leading
Health Indicators. Each month this series will highlight an organization that is using
evidenced-based approaches to address one of the Healthy People 2020 leading health
indicator topics. Next slide. During today’s webinar, you will hear from four distinguished
speakers, Assistant Secretary for Health Dr. Howard Koh will introduce this month’s leading
health indicator topic, Access to Health Services. Health and Human Services Regional Director
of Region V, Kenneth Munson, will give a snapshot of access to health services in HHS Region
V. And finally, for this month’s featured organization, Chicago South Side Health Care
Collaborative, Kimberly Hobson and Dr. Daniel Johnson will discuss how they are increasing
access to health services in their community. Next slide. First, let me give you some background on
Healthy People, the initiative that introduced the leading health indicators. For four decades,
Healthy People has provided a comprehensive set of national ten-year objectives that has
served as a framework for public health activities at all levels and across the public health
community. The Healthy People Initiative has evolved as the nation’s public health priorities
have changed. Often referred to as a roadmap for national
health promotion and disease-prevention efforts, Healthy People is about understanding where
we are now and taking informed actions to get where we want to go over a ten-year period
of time. Next slide. You may be interested, what are the leading
health indicators. Well, the leading health indicators are critical health issues that,
if addressed appropriately, will dramatically reduce the leading causes of preventable death
and illnesses. These indicators are critical health issues are linked to specific Healthy
People objectives. They’ve been selected to communicate high priority health issues
to the public along with actions that can be taken to address them with the overall
goal of improving the health of the entire population. Next slide. Well, as you can see, there are twelve LHI
topics. We intend to highlight one of these topics every month in 2012. This month, the
leading health indicator will be focusing on access to health services. We are showcasing
the South Side Health Care Collaborative which has made significant advances in improving
access to primary care services for residents of Chicago’s South Side. At this point,
I’d like to now welcome Dr. Howard Koh. DR. HOWARD KOH: Thank you, Dr. Wright. Thank
you for your leadership, and I’m absolutely delighted to be here to help launch this very
exciting monthly series. Healthy People 2020 and the Leading Health Indicators offers our
country a 2020 vision for a healthier nation. So we’re thrilled to have so many people
joining us for this launch. Allow me to give you a brief overview on this
month’s LHI topic, Access to Health Services. We chose this topic to lead off our series
because access to health services has been one of this Administration’s top priorities.
And we all know that to improve the health of all Americans, it is critical that more
Americans have access to both routine medical care and medical insurance. Access to health services has a profound impact
on every aspect of a person’s health, and we understand that people without medical
insurance are more likely to lack a usual source of medical care and are more likely
to skip routine medical care due to cost, increasing their risk for serious and disabling
health conditions. The leading health indicator access to health
services is divided into two parts, first, whether or not there’s access to medical
insurance and, secondly, whether or not people have a usual primary care provider. Unfortunately
right now in America, one in four people has no primary care provider or health center
where they can receive regular medical services, and approximately one in six Americans has
no medical insurance. But fortunately our new health reform law
has already begun expanding coverage to millions of Americans. And we at the Department of
Health and Human Services are committed to this effort in a number of ways. For example,
our Health Resources and Services Administration supports a network of more than 1,100 community
health centers that provide quality care to underserved communities. Also, the health reform law is increasing
access to affordable care by providing free access to many preventive services such as
vaccinations and cancer screening. And just recently, we have learned that the number
of people in the 19-25 age bracket who are being covered by health insurance has increased
by about 2.5 million compared to 2010 figures. That’s because the new health care law now
allows children to stay on their parents’ health plan until their 26th birthday. So thanks to this new law, we are truly making
progress to reach our Healthy People 2020 leading health indicator goal of increasing
access to health care for all Americans. So at this point, I’d like to turn the program
over to our Regional Director of Region V, Kenneth Munson, who will add a few words. MR. KENNETH MUNSON: Thank you, Dr. Koh. Well,
it’s a real privilege for me to be here with you all today. And I’m really proud
that today’s webinar also will highlight some of the great work being done here in
Region V. Region V is the six states in the Upper Midwest, and this program we’ll be
talking about is in the Chicago area. And I’ll echo Dr. Koh in saying that access
to primary care is critical and having a medical provider who knows you, who can help you manage
your chronic conditions and your emerging health challenges, we know that increasing
access to quality primary care saves lives, reduces suffering and by the way also saves
money. And as Dr. Koh said, here in Region V, we’re certainly aware that the health
reform law signed by the President in 2010 really invests in many ways in promoting and
providing and expanding access to primary care. One way is the investment in the National
Health Service Program which funds the primary care work force in underserved communities.
Illinois alone here, that program is funded in just 2011 about 300 new providers, doctors,
nurses and others who will be providing primary care in the most
underserved areas in this state, and that’s taking place across the whole country. And also the health reform law invests, as
Dr. Koh, in new and expanded community health centers. Here in our six state region, Region
V, again but I’d say over $100 million has been invested in new and existing community
health centers just since that law was signed in October — in March of 2010 across our
six-state region. And, of course, that’s also taking place across the country. That
builds on about $2 billion invested in health centers all across the country since the – over
the last three years. Now that discussion of community health centers
being expanded helps lead me to our next speakers, and I’m really gratified to build a spotlight
and example of really effective collaboration across health care institutions, across organizations,
across facilities — in this case, community health centers, academic medical centers,
hospitals all working together to provide great primary care to those who need it most. So I’m honored to be able to highlight the
South Side Health Collaborative, and I have the pleasure of introducing the leadership
of the Collaborative today. Now established in 2005, the South Side Health Collaborative
represents more than 30 community-based health centers in five local hospitals that are increasing
access to care by building really strong and ongoing relationships between our South Side
Chicago residents, our Chicago area residents and community-based primary care doctors and
by focusing on those things that are most important –- wellness, routine care and
prevention so that we can work to prevent disease and detect illness before they turn
into life threatening emergencies. They’re doing just tremendous work and having
a great impact across our Metropolitan region here. And I’d like to be able to have you
hear their successes firsthand. So rather than steal their thunder, please join me as
we welcome the Interim Director of the South Side Health Care Collaborative, Ms. Kimberly
Hobson and Dr. Daniel Johnson who’s Director of Community Health Sciences at the Urban
Health Initiative at the University of Chicago Medical Center.

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