MUS Board of Regents – March 7th, 2019

MUS Board of Regents – March 7th, 2019


– Good morning everyone, and welcome to the Board
of Regents meeting. And my gratitude to Helena College and Dean Kirk Lacy for hosting us today. I would like to begin by asking Ms. Amy Unsworth to provide us with a roll call. – [Amy Unsworth] Regent Albrecht. – Here. – [Amy Unsworth] Regent Lozar. – [Regent Lozar] Here. – [Amy Unsworth] Regent Sheehy. – [Regent Sheehy] Here. – [Amy Unsworth] Regent Johnson – [Mr. Johnson] Here. – [Amy Unsworth] Regent Rogers. – Here. – [Amy Unsworth] Regent Nystuen. – Here. – [Amy Unsworth] Regent Tuss. – Here. – [Amy Unsworth] Commissioner Christian. – [Commissioner Christian] Here. – [Amy Unsworth] (inaudible) later this morning. (inaudible) – Thank you. Vice Chair Nystuen. – Thank you, Madam Chair. Oh. Chair Albrecht, in abundance of caution, I move to suspend Article
four of our bylaws that could potentially interfere with you serving as chair, given your term has
officially expired for this March meeting. – You’ve all heard the motion. Any discussion from members of the board? Campuses? Any public comment? Seeing no further comment, I’ll call for the vote. All those in favor, signify by saying aye. – [Group] Aye. – Opposed, same sign. Motion passes. Thank you Regent Nystuen. Good morning. Good morning and welcome
everyone here today. Welcome President Cruzado. I’m glad that you could make it, given the situation you’ve been handling over in Boseman. And welcome to all of those with us today and those who are joining us online. We just returned this morning from our Hometown Helena meeting, and it is evident that our leaders at Helena College
have done an impressive job at the campus. We had a wonderful discussion with so many invested leaders in
our community here in Helena about the importance of education and how deeply everyone cares about education here in Helena, and across the state of Montana. As the legislative session
resumes from the break, there is so much work
to continue to be done and I am encouraged by
the positive efforts in support of education. We are in a great place. And I thank all of you who have been part of that, including our student leaders who have worked diligently and our commissioner and leaders across the system. I begin today’s meeting with
a heart full of gratitude for the rich opportunity that I have had to serve our beloved state of Montana as a member of this Board of Regents for the past six years. And this meeting, as many of you know, will be my last. I continue to be in awe of the exceptional work that is being done across
all of our 16 campuses. Throughout the state, and the incredible research, the commitment of faculty,
staff, and leadership, to the development of our
students day in and day out, who are so critical to
the health and vitality of our future. Over the last decade, we have survived an economic recession. We have sought innovative ways to continue to serve students and communities in an affordable and exceptional way. We’ve created programs
that have forged new paths, and we have strengthened our core to withstand the socio
and economic turbulence. We’ve remained committed to quality, access, and affordability, while seeking ways to work
across the system efficiently and effectively in stewarding our precious resources. We’ve continued to educate teachers and health care professionals who are giving back to Montana, many in rural areas where
we desperately need them. We’ve educated nurses,
engineers, technicians, physical therapists who
provide vital services to all Montanans, especially our aging populations. As we stand on the shoulders of giants who have come before us, I can say that I am hopeful
for the future ahead. With gratitude all of you for your steadfast commitment
to education in Montana, thank you for creating
spaces for innovation where freedom of speech can prevail, and respectful dialogue can be practiced. What an important gift that is to us in our community and our
society today and beyond. Thank you for developing critical thinkers that our society depends on to solve our greatest challenges, and collaborative skills to realize that we cannot solve
these challenges alone, that we are better together. And what a gift you are, all of you, to the economic engine of this state and to the global challenges that our faculty and students
will continue to address. And the wise words of Nelson Mandela, education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. To say that I am proud of this work would be a gross understatement. It has fulfilled me in a way that isn’t easily described. I will return to the agenda at hand, but before I get started, I just want to take a moment to thank all of you sincerely and humbly. I want to extend my sincere gratitude to the faculty, to the staff, to the leadership of our campuses, and to student leaders. I’d like to thank our commissioner and his incredibly talented team for being the glue that
keeps the system together. And to my fellow board members, I have enjoyed your support and your humor. I have enjoyed your commitment and your willingness to make some tough decisions over the years while keeping the mission central to the discussion. What a privilege it has been
to work with all of you. Thank you. And to our flagship leaders, to President Bodnar, and to President Cruzado, you have inspired me in
ways you may never know. But it has truly been a privilege. I am so grateful for this opportunity. And, as you continue to educate my children, and
those children yet to come, I thank you for that commitment. I’m depending on you. I’m depending on you all to carry this forward. We need it more than ever. This morning, the
commissioner will be providing a system report that
includes a legislative update and leadership search updates. The governor, to whom I am also grateful for having the confidence to appoint me to this position, will be here this morning. And Superintendent Arntzen will also provide an update. And we’ll have an exciting panel of folks with folks to talk about the community, and what’s going on in Helena. The regents will meet with
student representatives prior to our ARSA update. And we will take public comment prior to breaking for the evening. And tomorrow, we’ll kick things off with the budget and finance update, followed by committee reports. And with that, Mr. Commissioner, I will
happily hand it over to you. – Thank you, Madam Chair. Thank you for all of your service. We appreciate those comments. I believe we are going to to Dr. Lacy to give us a welcome from the campus. – Madam Chair, regents, Commissioner Christian, the great team at OCHE, and our colleagues from around Montana and the Montana University system. On behalf of our great team
here at Helena College, we welcome you to our campus, and look forward to the great discussions and meetings that we’ll have over the
next couple of days here. As part of welcoming you to our campus, we want to make sure you know that no matter what, we are here to ensure that you enjoy your experience
here at Helena College, so I’d like to introduce you to a few members of our team, so that if you have any questions, need directions, or assistance in any way, while you’re here, please reach out to any of these folks who will be around and visible
throughout the meetings. We have our great team over by the flags over here, the entrance. And Brenda Johnson, Whitney Strainer, Shannon Delao, student ambassadors that
we’re very proud of, Asher Esterby, Jim Kelly, James Ranger, and Courtney Radkey. Other faculty and staff will
be wearing their name tags and Helena College apparel, so if you need anything, please reach out to any of us and we’ll be happy to help you. You may not know this, but Helena College’s institutional history began way back in 1939. So we’re very excited
that at this meeting, we are able to kick off
a celebration of 80 years of educational excellence and innovation at Helena College. We’ve come a long way over these 80 years, and reflecting on our unique roll as a comprehensive two year college, we’re very proud of where we have been, where we are now, and where we are going. So in that spirit, I’d like to share with you a video that illustrates why I’m so proud of our incredibly talented faculty, classified staff, contract professionals, and students, and the great things they
do together every day to fulfill the important
mission and vision of our comprehensive two
year college right here in Helena, Montana. (soft music) Welcome to Helena College. We’re very excited to host
you on our campus today, and would like to take
you just a few minutes to share some of the great things that Helena College is
doing to successfully. (soft music) Welcome to Helena College. We’re very excited to host
you on our campus today and would like to take just a few minutes to share some of the great things that Helena College is doing to successfully fulfill
the important dimensions of our comprehensive two
year college mission, including college preparation through dual enrollment and high school partnerships, general education and university transfer programs, trades and career preparation, and community engagement and workforce development partnerships. (soft music) In addition to serving as a host site for Helena’s adult education programs, we’re very proud of our innovative access to success programs, which provides qualified adult learners without a high school diploma an opportunity to simultaneously enroll at both high school completion courses and Helena College courses. – There’s something about high school that didn’t really click with me. One day, when I felt like I had run out of all of my options, I looked into Access to Success, and I graduated that year with a 3.38, the highest grade I’ve
ever gotten in my life. I can easily say that
without Access to Success, I wouldn’t be where I am today. I would never have been on the dean’s list, or student ambassador. I wouldn’t have wanted to do the ambitious things
I’m chasing after today. (soft music) – Heard about Project SEED last year at the end of the school year from my chemistry teacher at Capital High. And she had said that they were looking for high schoolers to get a hands on research experience. – She said multiple times, what if I stay in Helena for a couple of years. What if I go to school at Helena College for a couple of years, and then transfer to a four year school? Or what if I, you know, and I think
that it opened up to her the idea that there are opportunities– – In Helena.
– Yeah. – There’s nice schools in Helena. – Yeah. (soft music) – [Dean Lacy] Working collaboratively with our local high school partners in the past 10 years, Helena College has
experienced over 396% growth in the number of students participating in our dual enrollment course offerings. – We’re working with
our partner high schools to provide quality dual
enrollment opportunities on the high school campuses, online and at the Helena College campuses. Thanks to One, Two, Free, we’re anticipating serving 800 students this academic year for dual enrollment. (soft music) – [Dean Lacy] A third of
Helena College students are enrolled in general education and university transfer programs. And Helena College is proud to have very strong
university transfer pathways with every on of the
four year universities in the Montana University system. (soft music) – Helena College provided me the ability to lay the groundwork in front of me to be prepared to meet the demands of
(inaudible) and courses. – The pre-pharm program is, it’s a very demanding two year program, with all the core classes, as well as advanced science classes. This was originally put together and started for the fall 2013 semester. And these students have
done extremely well. And we’re very proud that of the seven students now have applied to, and been accepted to the state school of pharmacy at the University of Montana in Mossula. (soft music) – [Dean Lacy] Not only do
we have great university transfer pathways for our students, we’re very proud of how
successful our students are in their academic performance once they do transfer to our university partners. (soft music) A third of Helena College students are enrolled in trades and
career preparation programs. And Helena College is very proud of how well we prepare our students for success in their chosen career fields, while also linking our students with employer partners
and career opportunities in Helena, throughout Montana, and all around the country. (soft music) – Helena College’s automotive program has actually struggled the last few years with completion and retention. We actually put the program
moratorium last summer and took a year to redesign and regroup. We’ve come up with a solution that we think’s going to
better benefit the students. They have partnered each student with a local business for a workplace learning partnership. Students will attend Helena
College in the morning, and they will be going to their workplace learning experience in the afternoon. As they reach each milestone with their college courses, and with their skills in the industry, they’ll receive a wage increase. So by the end of their college experience, they’ll have received an associate of applied science degree as well as about a thousand
hours of workplace learning, and they’ll be able to be employed at a higher wage than just your average two year college graduate. (soft music) – We actually have been rated a number one for the two
year nursing programs in the state of Montana. What they looked at for these ratings is our pass rates, which we enjoy 100% pass rate the last couple of semesters in the RN program and the LPN program. We received a 97.2% rating. The next rating by a two year college was about a 92%. (soft music) – [Dean Lacy] Helena College is very proud to serve as an active partner in Helena, working collaboratively with other education, business, government, community stakeholders to promote workforce, community, and economic development throughout the greater
Helena service region, while also serving the
important personal enrichment, community education, and lifelong learning needs of our Helena residents. – Through our strategic
enrollment planning process, our continuing ed unit has moved from just continuing ed into more of a community engagement and workforce development, to align a little bit closer
to our strategic plan. Part of our community engagement, we’re offering free evening events, along with our regular
adult evening classes. We have study abroad, which connects our credit
and our noncredit students, or professional development training, workforce development training, and Helena Wins initiative, which is a project that is sponsored by the Helena
Chamber of Commerce. – Helena College has
recently re implemented the small business development center as a host into the workforce development and community engagement sector of Helena College. This has allowed small
business development center to work with small business entities in Helena that integrate students
into the workforce. (soft music) – I actually got a scholarship
to go to Helena College, here. So for my first year, I go and I do the machine program. The first year is about manual machining. So if you run stuff by hand, which is just a great foundation for somebody that wants
to go into this career. So after that, I went into the second year program, and I knew at that point, going into the CNC, that’s
what I wanted to do. So I graduated on Friday, and I got hired at Somin
Aeronautics on Monday. And about a year and a half ago, I got and opportunity to put in for a job in NC programming. So now, I’m not actually
running the machines, but I’m programming and sending the code out to guys on the shop floor. And now I’ve got some
parts for the Boeing 737. And the best part is, I can do it here in Helena, Montana. (soft music) – Although these were just a few examples of many great things
happening at Helena College, we hope this short video
helps you understand why we’re so proud of the great work being done every day by our talented faculty, classified staff, contract professionals, and students to fulfill the important dimensions of our mission as a
comprehensive two year college, right here in Helena, Montana. (soft music) (applause) In addition to the video, very briefly, I’d like to highlight how we’re preparing for the next 80 years. And the strategic
initiatives that we focused, three specific strategic initiatives that we focused our
entire campus’ efforts on this past year that are going to take us forward in a positive
direction in the future. We all know that all of our institutions are grappling with the same challenges that are impacting our enrollments, with demographics
changes around the state, economic challenges that are impacting workforce demands, and enrollments across
all of our institutions. While we may not be able to control the demographic changes, and the economic challenges, we can control how we
adapt and respond to them. So, a year ago, in March, the college launched a comprehensive, strategic enrollments planning initiative, SEP, which is designed to create a comprehensive strategic plan for the longterm enrollment sustainability growth, and fiscal heath here at Helena College. It’s a campus wide endeavor, including individuals across the campus, faculty, staff, contract professionals, senior leadership, focused on four areas of emphasis to guide our strategic enrollment planning over the next several years. Every program and service
that we’re offering is being assessed for opportunities for excellence and innovation advancement. We have work groups focused on student recruitment and admissions, student retention and
completion and progression, and community engagement
and workforce development. And between now and June, we’ll be concluding this year long process and have a comprehensive plan that involves specific strategies for each of these areas, action plans, institutional investments, and specific goals and targets and metrics to measure the return on these investments as we move forward. The second major initiative was launched also a year ago, involving inter campus
collaborations between Helena College and the
University of Montana. Last March, Commissioner Christian and President Bodnar came to our campus, met with the entire campus community. And as part of those discussions, President Bodnar encouraged all of us at Helena College to put a significant
amount of effort into play to figure out how do we join our efforts together to improve our collaborations between our institutions. We took that encouragement seriously. We engaged in a comprehensive surveys, focus groups, with all campus community stakeholders. And we ultimately came
up with a top 10 list of specific initiatives that we would focus on this year to improve the collaborations and the outcomes for support of our students
and our communities through the partnership
between our campuses. We’ve established inter campus collaboration teams that have been meeting
throughout the year, fall semester and this spring, and we’re very excited about the outcomes that are coming together, and the foundation that is laying for positive directions moving forward. The focus of these outcomes is in improving opportunities
for Helena College students that transfer to the
University of Montana, academic and degree
program collaborations, both between the two, two year campuses, Helena College and Missoula College, as well a Helena College
and the mountain campus. We’re also focused on
looking at opportunities for efficiency and effectiveness through shared and seamless
service partnerships in human resources, information technology, business services, and our foundation programs. And so Madam Chair, with your permission, I’d like to offer President Bodnar a few minutes to speak to the positive outcomes that have been generated
from these efforts. – Absolutely. – Thank you Dr. Lacy and Madam Chair, members of the Board of Regents. I want to thank and commend Kirk for
the work that’s happened over the last year. It is very, very exciting. And I think you saw in the video, students highlighted, and some of the comments
struck you is that there are great opportunities to start in Helena, and go wherever you want to go. And I think that is what
is so exciting about the partnership here is that we want a student here in Helena to be able to not just
come here to Helena College and succeed, and complete their studies, if they choose, at Helena College, but to have access to all the resources of the Montana University system. And I’m very grateful
for Kirk’s leadership in the first area in terms
of improving opportunities for those students who
do want to transfer, providing information, making sure that students
are clear on those pathways. We’ve in fact hired a transfer coordinator at the University of Montana. We’ve had multiple events. We’ve had an event even just last Friday where we had students who
are intending to transfer to the university come over to the university for a day and meet with all of the leadership and various functions at UM to make that transition seamless. Or having another event in April where the various
University of Montana teams are coming here and meeting with students, and providing information, again, to make that transfer process, for those who want to do that, seamless. And we’re excited to see the real impacts. We’re excited to see that UM and Helena College, this partnership, as part of our affiliation for the time in a decade that UM is the transfer university of choice from Helena College students. So we’re really excited about providing those opportunities. And the second area, I think, is just as, if not more
exciting to look at. Building upon what we’ve seen, the pre-pharmacy program
highlighted in the video, but it’s not just from
Helena College to UM, it’s Helena College with Mossula Collage in the case of legal
administrative support certificate of applied sciences. It’s a one year program that has been in place
here at Helena College. We’ve established a clear articulation with Mossula College two year AAS in paralegal studies. You can do the first year
here at Helena College, the second year in conjunction with Mossula College, eventually with a remote option as well. But that nests also to a bachelor of applied
sciences in pre-law that builds right into a law degree, if one chooses to do so. And so the idea is that again, from Helena College, you can really go anywhere. And that is a seamless, clear pathway, and you can choose how
far down that pathway you want to proceed. And we’re building similar pathways and collaboration opportunities to our MBA program, or MPA, our social work, our health and careers in health career. And I think this is a really important step, because a lot of students want to start here close to home, want to be able to pursue
their education fully at home. And we want to provide
those opportunities. And I think we’re building some good momentum in that direction, thanks to Kirk’s leadership. And finally, on shared and
seamless service partnerships, we want that student experience to be as seamless as possible. And that does require a lot of work behind the scenes in the realm of shared services, whether it’s human resources, automation of payroll and onboarding, recruiting processes to make sure that we’re working to be as efficient as we can as an affiliation behind the scenes. Around IT, even things to the foundation, we have the U of M foundation. It doesn’t make sense for Helena College to build a foundation infrastructure. So how can UM’s foundation help assist with the
Helena College foundation. So all of those, what
I’d call back office, or non-core functions, how can we do those as
effectively together as possible to make sure that we’re serving students in the most effective way. So I’m very excited about
the progress we’ve made in the last year. And I want to thank the entire Helena College community, cause this has been a big team effort. And we’ve seen real tangible progress in a fairly short time. – Thanks president, thanks President Bodnar. The last initiative that
I want to highlight is very exciting in how things are coming
together this last year. And in partnership with
the Helena community, and the Helena area chamber of commerce, Helena College has been a core partner in what we’re calling the
Helena WINS initiative. And WINS is an acronym for
workforce innovation networks. Knowing the challenges
of all of our employers are grappling with in
terms of workforce needs and the need for talent attraction, talent development, and talent retention, all across the state, especially for us here at Helena, our focus is how are we helping serve those important workforce needs in partnership with employer partners right here in the Helena area. So this workforce innovation networks, Helena WINS initiative, has involved convening
all of the business, education, government
and community partners from around the Helena area that have some piece of the puzzle of addressing workforce
development needs in the area. And convening with those
stakeholders in the community, convening groups of
employers by industry sector, particularly in manufacturing, information technology, construction and health care, working with those employers to assess their priority workforce
development needs, and then developing pilot projects, focused around work based
learning partnerships, where our education partners, including Helena College, Carol College, Helena public schools, East Helena public schools, adult education, and private education
partners right here in Helena, we can all pool together
our educational resources to partner with employers
on work based partnerships, integrating those work
based learning partnerships into our academic programs. And bringing those employers
through those education work based learning partnerships, a talent pipeline that is designed to serve those employers talent attraction development, and retention needs. We’re very excited this spring that the Helena area chamber of commerce and 400 area business recognize Helena College and this Helena WINS initiative and the other partners involved as the top volunteering initiative of the year because of the way that
this initiative has successfully helped our area employers. So we’re very proud of the outcomes of this
initiative as well. With that, I’ll conclude
by just saying once again welcome to Helena College. You’ll notice that in front of you, in the welcome bags, there is a metal business card holder that is complements of our welding students. – [Woman] That’s cool. – And a special welcome
gift from them to you. – Thank you, Dean Lacy. At this moment in the agenda, I would like to move to
approval of the minutes from the January 8, 2019 board meeting. I would entertain a motion
to approve the minutes. – [Regent Johnson] So moved. – Motion made by Regent Johnson. Any discussion or corrections
from members of the board? From the campuses? Any public comment on this item? Seeing no further comment,
I’ll call for the vote. All those in favor, signify by saying aye. – [Group] Aye. – Opposed, same sign. Motion passes. Thank you. Commissioner Christian. – Madam Chair, thank you. Thank you Dr. Lacy for your warm welcome, and the great work that’s going
on here at Helena College. So we will dig right in. We’re maybe a few minutes behind, which is fine. When the governor shows, we do anticipate he
will be here around 10. And we’ll probably let
him make his comments and move on. If we get to that, we’ll take a break from what we have to offer. What I want to start with is legislative update. Certainly that’s on everyone’s minds. And it’s certainly been
on our minds for the last 40 some days now. Start with house bill two. You all have a list of
those bills in front of you that looks sort of like this. The entirety of what your crew at OCHE is tracking, we meet every day on this list, to get an update of what’s
happening on the bills. And we add bills to the list as new ones are introduced. Although that process, for the most part, has stopped with transmittal. A little bit about the calendar, we have hit the 45 day point, which is good in a number of ways. That is transmittal for general bills. So the run of the mill non-revenue, non-appropriations bills have to have been passed and moved through the first body to the second at day 45. So the other good thing is the legislature takes a break then, which is good for their
attitudes and probably ours. That break concluded yesterday, and we are back on track today with a number of hearings. The next sort of relevant days for you to be thinking about, day 60 is when they will have to agree to a revenue estimate. Montana has a constitutional requirement that structurally balanced budget, and so they have to come to agreements on what the revenue estimates are, and balance the budget to that. And so, I would say in terms of an update, the estimates sometimes
in previous sessions have been a long ways apart between the governor’s budget office and legislative fiscal. They are not. This session, there’s still a lot of work to do from the legislature, but the budget as moving
forward is not significantly at a structural balance. So assuming they can agree
on a revenue projection, which they will have to by day 60, then we’ll start to balance to that. I don’t think they’re a long ways from getting to that. I mean there is a conclusion in sight, in my humble opinion. Sometimes when we’re in the two to 500 million dollars apart, it seems like there’s a lot of work to do, of course, all things can
change in the session, but that is where it stands. And then day 67 is the final day for appropriations bills, those with spending authority to transfer from that. That’s interim break, the last day that those bills can transfer from one body to the other. Although, as I often remind everyone, they can suspend our rules and that changes the calendar and everything else when they want to. So we don’t know for sure, but that is certainly a general guideline of where we’re headed. House bill two, as you all know, the primary feature of that for us, and we’re gonna get into
this significantly more in the budget part of this tomorrow, so I don’t want to dig too deep, but as you recall, the
significant part of this for us is the $24 million that would provide the funds that we need for a proposed flat tuition moving forward. I’m happy to report that that $24 million, along with a few other one time only monies to support the SEED lab, the wool lab, water quality bureau, and fire safety. I don’t think I got water
quality bureau quite right, but I’m pretty close. My apologies to tech. Those had some additional funds, about $800,000 that
were added to our budget as one time only. And that passed unanimously out of subcommittee. The other key component of that was the governor, and
our combined efforts to increase need based aid. The governor put $5 million in the budget as based moving forward, and we have agreed with the help of our foundations across the system to match those funds for need based aid in the coming biennium. I remain optimistic and
still happy to report that number was reduced, but it was, there’s still $2 million of state funds to be matched by ours that passed out of subcommittee and will go in front of aprops. Like I said, there’s
some other things we did, like I shared policy goals
and that we’ll get into, and try to answer all the questions surrounding that in the budget committee. We do have our portion of house bill two in front of the full
appropriations committees starting today at 10. So Deputy Commissioner Trevor will be exiting before too long and go over to that hearing. And when need be, I will have to excuse myself too. So I apologize for that. But we’ll be in good hands here with our chair and Deputy
Commissioner Tessman will fill in for me as needed. But that will go on sometime today. They have sections B and E in front of the sub committee today. And it’s my anticipation that they will try to
finish those sometime before night falls. But we’ll see. The other sort of in a group
bill that I want to mention is what’s happening with long range building. And again, we have Mr.
Muffick here tomorrow. We will talk through that in some detail. There is a lot going on there as it relates to the list in front of you, things that are included
in long range building, house bill 14, it is on your list, house bill five is on your list, a new one, house bill 553, the idea bill that is on your list, and then to some extent, senate bill 307. Those four we will cover
in some detail tomorrow. But the fact of the matter is, five, 14, the ones that normally move, they’re not tabled. They just haven’t had any movement yet. And that’s sort of where
we anticipate they will be. 553 is a comprehensive bill that passed out of the house and is now transmitted to the senate, 100 to nothing, which would look at debt capacity and funding
infrastructure for Montana on a much more proactive
and forward thinking. And we’ll talk some about that tomorrow. But for the sake of that, I will skip over those. The other bills on your list here, the priority ones. And if you’ll look to the
second to the far right columns, it will show you our priorities. We give them as they come up, either one, two, or three. And that’s the level of
scrutiny that we look at. And the ones I wanted
to hit on this morning are the ones, house bill 13, which is at the top of your list. That too sits idle. We think it will probably live in that idle position throughout on day one of the session, a similar or same bill was introduced, house bill 175, which is also on your list that essentially had a very
similar pay plan structure to it as that was in house bill 13. House bill 175 has passed
with high levels of support and is now sitting on the governor’s desk waiting for his signature, which will provide a substantial amount of funding, six million and some dollars for us in terms of a pay plan. Again, we’ll go over that in more detail in the budget meeting. But that is good news for all. It’s part of the state pay plan. That’s certainly is to all state employees, but then there’s a chunk of funds in there for the university system as well. House bill 61 was the bill that we talked
about a number of times that related to the privacy sharing issues that we had on the ACT. It’s a bill that the
superintendent Arntzen and our team worked together to move through. I’m happy to report that it went through with tremendous support. It has been signed, and is now law. So we will be able to collect and receive ACT data when that test is taken in April. And students have to check the box, which they’ve always had to do, which will allow that. But when they check that box, every student and their
families in Montana will save $52, I believe is the number, and be able to take that test for free and have those results transmitted
to the university system. So that’s a huge win for us. I appreciate the superintendent’s support on that. She worked hard on it. The sponsor, representative Bedey, first bill that he carried and passed with flying colors. So we truly appreciate
his support as well. House bill 619 is a similar bill just introduced at the very tail end. Something that I, well, obviously it passed out of the house 97 to two, so it has pretty broad support. But it, along the same lines, one of the things that we talked about in sub committee, and that we talked more about in the house bill 61
conversations is the data and the flow of that data between Montana entities, mainly OPI, Montana university system, and department of labor. This latest bill, 619, would allow a flow of
that longitudinal data between those three institutions. So we can start to, for the first time, follow students from K12 through higher ed into the workforce. Know more about what’s working, what isn’t working, what’s making those students successful, and ultimately how they’re serving that economic engine and that
workforce need for Montana. We obviously are supporting that, appreciate sponsors Zolnikov for doing it. Also, I would say representative Jones has been very instrumental
in moving this forward, and we appreciate their efforts. Senate bill 152, certainly something we
know something about, and that is the removing
the sunset provision from the six mil levee. It has passed out of senate, and I appreciate Senator Barrett. He actually did a fantastic job talking through with the sub committee, and ultimately the senate, why that is what it is. He also got some help
from Mary Moe, I’m told, which is kind of an interesting sidebar. But at the time, when the original six
mil levee was passed, there was constitutional language that restricted property tax over one and a half mil. And so to get to a six mil levee, it had to go to the people. And that’s why it started, unlike most revenue. It was truly revenue that is controlled by the legislative body. It’s the only one, frankly, we think it’s the
only on in the country, and it’s certainly the
only one in the state of a revenue source that we continue to
take back to the voters and ask for their support. He did a good job walking through that. He also highlighted the fact that it’s now passed 10 times. And maybe it’s time to
take yes for an answer, and kind of the theme of this. I’ve been asked a number of times, but it’s great affirmation
about what higher ed is doing. And I agree. And I got to tell you, as commissioner, it’s both a sense of pride
and a sigh of relief that we saw some of the first upticks in public support for
higher education passed with the second highest margin. And it passed with the
highest total yes votes ever. A great source of pride. The truth is though, for, well I won’t be here in 10 years. I’m pretty certain of that. But for whoever is, that sense of pride is a bit diminished by the fact that it costs us $1.6 million to get there. And a lot of business and individuals tell us there’s better use for that money, and we agree. And also, we anticipate
that it’s probably a three to three and a half million dollar cost 10 years from now. And so, while the affirmation
is greatly appreciated, the cost outweighs that. And if we can get the sunset removed, I think that would be a great step for us. I spent a little more time because that is coming in front of house tax. And of course, we anticipate
this will be a pretty heavy lift in the tax, but it really would benefit Montana students. Senate bill 218. That has gotten some attention, so I mention it. It really is about how we
compensate resident assistants. I want to say that it really
is an effort to confirm and clarify what we have
been doing for years, and years, and years in the university system, and across the university system. That’s providing housing
and other stipends to individuals that are
willing to serve as RAs. There’s been some questions
around that language, and so we asked for clarity. This has been what we
referred to as Helen’s Bill. Helen Thigpen has helped shepherd this through. It has passed out of the senate 48 to one. And we anticipate it now
moving on to the house. And we’ll continue to look for that clarity. Senate bill 60, which is a restatement of the STEM scholarship that was presented in 2015, I believe, yeah. Basically, took some lottery earnings, lottery funds, and created a scholarship program around STEM. And it requires high school
students to do certain things to qualify. And then to maintain certain levels to continue to get it. And if you do maintain those in college, you continue to get a higher amount. Those things are four years of math, science, other things to
prepare you for STEM fields. It has been, it was successful, popular. The problem is, is that it also relied on
some of the last dollars to come out of the lottery funds. And those last dollars never materialized. We were left a bit, at
the commissioner’s office, and the campuses scratching our heads, now we’ve awarded scholarships
that we have no funding for. And we had to pull some of those back. We did, working with some funds that we held
in other scholarships, some support from the former HESAC, yeah, that helped support it, and others, support from the campuses fund those that we had already awarded. But we have suspended
awarding any future ones. Senator Solomon, a supporter of higher ed, but a supporter of this cause as well, brought forward a bill to not only clarify some of how that worked. It gave us some direction on how we would appropriate those bills, or those scholarships out if full funding wasn’t available. But then he’s also moved the funding from last dollars out to first dollars out. So we think it would dramatically change the reliability of those
source of funds for us. So it’s a good bill. We’ve been supporting, in support of it. It also helps clarify sort of that three legged stool that Tyler’s talked a
lot about in terms of need based aid, directed, targeted aid, for financial support. And it removes from statute some of the scholarship programs that are on the books and haven’t been funded for a while, because I think that’s
incredibly confusing for high schools, and counselors, advisors, parents, when there’s scholarships out there, no funding behind them. Some that have been lost, Baker Grants, MTAP, MHAG, Governor’s Best and Brightest, those have sat without funds in them. So we essentially are
offering scholarships, no funding, a great sense of confusion. I think this will boil it down. So you would have the STEM scholarship. You would have some merit scholarship. And then if we are successful in house bill two, we would also have a new
source of need based aid, that puts together sort
of three legs of this. So an important bill to us. It passed out 47 to three. So great support coming out of the senate. It’s now been transmitted to the house. And then lastly on my list, the ever, ever, ever important confirmation of our board members. I believe– – [Man] Bottom of the list. – Yeah. Regent Rogers, Regent Lozar, and Regent Johnson up for confirmation tomorrow afternoon. So that will be another
priority one bill for us, seeing how we fare tomorrow afternoon. So that’s sort of the list in a nutshell. If there’s any questions
about any of those, I’m glad to answer. Regent Sheehy. – Commissioner, I just wanted to clarify, when you were talking about the six mil, you said that it costs us 1.6 million to pass the six mil. And you didn’t mean us, OCHE, or us the board of regents. – Madam Chair, Regent
Sheehy, I greatly appreciate that clarification, because I didn’t mean that. I may have gave some personally, so it felt like us. But I meant the sponsors
throughout Montana. There are no institutional
funds that were spent on that endeavor. But it is a costly one. So I appreciate the clarification. Thank you. Other questions. No, okay. Well, then we will move on. The other things on our list. A brief update on the system searches. As you well know, our good friend, Chancellor Blackhatter has decided to retire, and so that search is well under way. The committee has met, the application process has closed. We received 56 high quality applications. They’ve now narrowed those down to 13. And they will start with
semi finalist interviews, I believe next week, yeah, on those. So that’s moving along quite well. We’ve also come to the conclusion that we will do a full blown national search
here at Helena College. We’ve engaged the same services of AGB Search, that is helping
us with the tech search. We did, we did achieve a little bit
of an economy of scale there by doing the two for one thing. And so we’ve decided that
that is a good use of funds, and we’ve engaged them. That search is moving forward. They’ve done some listening sessions, and they’re ready to kick that off. We also have, per many
conversations along the way, the search under way. We’ve interviewed some finalists for our compliance officer at OCHE, help us across the system, make sure that we are reporting well. You know, people often ask, why is the cost of education risen, and I really think that
it is misunderstood the complexity of federal reporting guidelines that exist today, that didn’t exist 10 years ago, certainly didn’t exist 20 years ago. It really has become, unfortunately, a bit of an
enterprise in of it’s own, and making certain that we’re checking the boxes
correctly in that process is something that I think some real guidance will be helpful to in making certain that we’re
doing that across the system. So that moves forward, and then we also are about to launch the search for an internal auditor at OCHE which will be essentially the sort of centralized audit person that will oversee all audits throughout. And there will be some reporting lines, which we’ve worked with the campuses. We think that’s necessary for the compliance issues
within their own audit guidelines, that there’s reporting lines
that flow back to OCHE, and flow back to the board. So that will help us get
to where we need to be to be compliant on that front as well. A couple other things
that I want to hit on, if there’s no questions on that. Starting with certainly a congratulations. I’m thrilled for them. Proud as a commissioner, and proud for our system that MSU Bozeman has regained
its Carnegie one status. That puts them in one of
the top 130 institutions out of 4,300 nationwide. That is something that has been there right within reach. And we’re very proud of what you’ve been able to accomplish there, President Cruzado. And certainly like to offer
you a moment to speak to that if you would like to. – Thank you so much, Mr. Commissioner, Madam chair, members of the board. Thank you so much for the opportunity to recognize the hard work of so many people at Montana State University that have made this possible. You know, in 2015, when the Carnegie Foundation changed the criteria, they reclassified Montana State University to the second tier. So we decided to put together three task forces. One of them was on improving
graduate student admissions and degree completion. The second one was in
strengthening research and scholarly work. And the third one was on
faculty workload review. These three task forces were co-chaired by faculty member, and deans, and administrators. And something very special happened, that they gave us the
necessary focus and discipline in order to regain this very
important classification. I cannot overemphasize
how important research is in the life of a university. It’s what makes learning exciting. I am so proud of the fact that students at Montana State University are not just, are not learning
passively from a textbook. They are actually learning from the people who are writing the textbooks, and writing the peer reviewed journals, and confronting adversity. And as I always like to say, the part that I like the most is when our students are exposed to failure. When they see that researcher battling, and an experiment doesn’t work, but they persist. I think that those are life lessons that they will take with them on how to persist, how to overcome difficulty, and how to continue to
push and forge ahead with, with the new creativity and new learning. Just to put this in perspective, your universities now, the only university in the region with an R one category. That included Idaho, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming. So we’re very proud of this recognition. Kudos to Vice President Reijo Pera for leading this effort. And to the faculty, the staff, the undergraduate students, and the graduate students
at Montana State university. Last but not least, in 2020, Montana State University will be hosting the national meeting of Anchor. That’s the national organization for undergraduate research. We, when we went to Anchor, what we proposed is that
we wanted to make sure that we reached out to every campus in the Montana University System, and to all our seven tribal colleges. So I hope that you jot down those dates for spring of 2020, and let’s celebrate research
at Montana State University. Thank you. – Thank you President Cruzado. And again, congratulations to you and your entire team. It truly is an accomplishment. And if you’re in the research business in higher education, that’s the standard that you aspire to. And we’re incredibly proud of you. Thank you. Last but not least, I would like to ask Martha, Regent Sheehy to share a few thoughts
on where we intend to go with maybe a proposed bylaws
change moving forward. It’s certainly clear that we received a bit of a question
and comment scrutiny over some of our comments
from a previous meeting. We’re a governing body, and it’s up to us to make certain that we follow our own rules. And Regent Sheehy has some suggestions that may be useful to that end. – Thanks commissioner. So about a year ago, the commissioner on political practices determined that the board of regents violated the code of ethics by discussing the six
mil at an open meeting. OCHE paid that fine, and as an individual regent, I appealed that decision
to the district court. And the district court has determined that regents are not public employees, and we do exercise independence that’s constitutionally granted. As a result, as the law now stands, and there’s still a a
possibility of an appeal, but as it now stands, the BOR, and each of us
as an individual member of this board, is not subject to the jurisdiction of the
commissioner on political practices. The decision rests quite
a bit regent independence, and it’s something that in
the course of litigating this, I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about. Why are we Independent, and why
is that in the constitution. And why is it so important that our meetings be conducted openly. The litigation revealed
a difference of opinion as to the extent of that independence. And I think that we can clarify that by amending our own code of expectations to govern our meetings and to
use our independence in a way that is clearer to the public, clearer to the governmental agencies. So I’ll be proposing some amendments to the code of expectations that deal with the issue
that doesn’t come before us very often, but does occasionally, and that is political issues. So I think if we address
that more directly in our own code, there will be fewer questions
from other agencies, and we’ll be exercising our independence in a way that’s valid. – Thank you Regent Sheehy, but I think it’s an important step that we do that, and we’ll bring some proposed changes to those code of expectations probably at the May meeting. Any questions about that? Okay. Is, I want to welcome from
Salish Kootenai College, Dr. Boham. If she’s here. Oh, right there. Thank you for being here. We continue to recognize
the incredible importance that the Tribal College
community brings to overall education in Montana, the role that you all play in our system. And the need, and the
effort that we need to make to work together to collaborate. So welcome to this meeting. And I apologize. I didn’t see you earlier. I didn’t give you a heads up. But if you’d like to
share any thoughts now, we’d certainly welcome you to the table or the podium to do that. I know that you’ve shared some in the past in public comment. And you’re certainly
a member of this team, and we welcome you to share
some thoughts if you want to, or you can do that later if you want. Whatever, best, okay. Sounds good, thank you. Well welcome, and thank
you for being here. I know it takes time out of your schedule, but we really, truly
appreciate the relationship that we have, and the growing relationship
that we have with our Tribal College partners, and the effort that you all are making to be here at our meetings. Thank you. Madam Chair, I’m glad to report that I’m done a few minutes early. We anticipate the governor at 10. So I will hand this back to you, but it is your prerogative. We can either take a short break, or, oh, introductions. Not on my list. I apologize. We absolutely should do that. And we’re at that time. So I would anticipate that President Bodnar, you
have some introductions. I apologize for skipping that. – I do. And madam chair, board of regents, Mr. Commissioner, thank you. I’m learning the rhythm of these meetings. And when I’m supposed to introduce new members of the team. And there are two that I want to introduce from the University of
Montana at this meeting. And the first is here with us, and that is Paul Lassiter. Paul, if you could stand. He should be up. There he is in the back. Paul, Paul is our new vice president for operations and finance. He joined the University of Montana from Pepperdine University. So if you think of the experience of coming from Malibu, California to Montana for this winter, Paul has been hearty, and has just really jumped right in. He’s a fantastic team player, hard worker. He spent the last 16 years in various roles at Pepperdine, as the vice president for finance, the chief financial officer, and experience in the private sector prior to that. So we’re very excited to have Paul join us. Many of you will know that we have, for the past year and a half, had an interim vice president for administration and finance, and that was Rosie Keller. And Rosie was really
called out of the bullpen from retirement to step in, and fill and important role for the University of Montana for the past year and a half. And Rosie has done a tremendous job. Rosie is not here today, but I wanted to highlight Rosie and just her
passion, her commitment, her love of the University of Montana. She brings a passion that only a, only a, those of you that know Rosie, my nickname for her is nuke because she’s so small and she has such an intensity
of energy and passion that really can only be forged by growing up in Butte, as she did. And she has been a fantastic
leader for the team. She’s gonna stick around and work on a part time basis to help Paul through the transition. And then we’ll send her off in style. But I wanted to at least acknowledge and thank
Rosie for her service and an interim, and stepping
up and doing a great job for the University of Montana. I also want to welcome another individual that isn’t here with us today, because she’s, she’s working. And that is our new vice provost for student success, Sarah Swagger. So Sarah, many of you will recall middle of last year, we announced a restructuring of the University of Montana. We identified student success as will be at the center of
every decision we make, every action we take. And we felt it imperative
to organize ourselves around that, putting together the academic affairs, and student affairs of the University of Montana, and looking at that student experience from a holistic standpoint
in the classroom, and out of the classroom. And to, with this newly integrated sector, have a leader on top of that whose sole focus is
that student experience, and increasing rates of
persistence and success, and helping students succeed over the course of their career. And we’re so happy to have Sarah join us. She is a native of Sheridan, Montana. And has spent really the last 35 years at various institutions
of higher education in the student affairs arena. She graduated Colby College, Bowling Green. Got her doctorate from the other U of M in Michigan. And is jumped on board, and doing a fantastic job. So we’re very happy to have
Sarah on the team now as well. – Other introductions? Chancellor Edelman. – Madam Chair, Mr. Commissioner, I have the honor to introduce Dr. Vicky Treer. Where’s she at? Vicky is a new dean at City College. And as you know, City College
is a gem within our system. It is well supported by the community. Vicky has a lot of experience at Lane Community College. She served as dean of arts and sciences, and also acting dean of health
and environmental sciences. She’s also been the director
of the university of Idaho, McNair Achievement program, and academic coordinator
retention specialist. She’s hit the ground running. She’s formed a lot of
good partnerships already. She’s putting students first, and she’s making a difference. So Vicky, welcome to our team. – Welcome. Any other introductions? Seeing none, madam chair, I believe that concludes where we’re at with the Commissioner’s comments and we can move on the agenda. – Okay. (indistinct chatter) All right, thank you commissioner. And welcome. It’s great we have
superintendent Arntzen here. And it’s great to have you here. Thank you for all your
work and your diligence on behalf of education. And at this point, if you are ready, we would love to move into hearing remarks from you about the status of education. Thank you. – Thank you very much, Chair Albrecht. If I could, I would like to pass out, I know on our website, we also have that available. It’s our 66th legislative session update, and it’s our
transmittal packet, if I could. You bet. Go through it. It annotates the bills. There were 100 bills
that we could count of that impacted K12 education. And some of that was an
overlap between our two shops. And so we did put that into play. We have been very
diligent with our budget. I fact, I know commissioner, you are
up today on the hill, as well as myself, discussing our budget with the appropriations committee on the legislature. We’re excited that the K12 funding bill of $77 million was signed by the governor. And I was very appreciative
to be part of that. K12 education funding
is not a partisan issue. It has not aisle. It is extremely important
for budgetary purposes that our schools understand that the legislature, that the state of Montana is behind them in funding our over 800
schools that we have, our 400 school districts, and our more than 147,000 students. So we are very, very pleased for that. And it was one of the
largest funding packages amidst everything that the legislature put out first. So putting Montana students first was something that the
legislative body has done. We have an education
caucus in the morning, twice a month, that we have reviewed multiple things from workforce ready, from college development, from all kinds of, things that happen with the whole child, dealing with mental health awareness, making sure that legislators understand what we’re already doing
at the state level, what our partnerships can be, with you, as much as they are
with the department of labor, department of commerce, to show great government. The other thing that we do is every week, we meet with our Tribal
education partners. And it is extremely important to me, as it should be to everyone in our state, that all means all. That all students, regardless of where
they are geographically, wherever they might be, that they all matter. So we meet with them. We’ve talked budgets. We talk what we are working at in school improvement. How we’re shouting out success within our Tribal government, our Tribal communities, and more importantly, for our Tribal students. But, that legislature does not stop everything that has happening
in schools at this point. We are, I do want to say, that we have a Montana Ready Day. That will be April 3rd in the Rotunda. We’ve already had multiple days in the Rotunda sharing education. And isn’t that what we’re all about, making sure that they understand what their precious tax dollars are doing in the K12 space, but also in a partnership. So the partnership that
will be happening April 3rd, is Montana Ready. It’s that investment in K12. It’s our partnership to have a public private partnerships so that we have the chamber
that’s going to be there. We have students that are
going to be showcased. We have teachers that are going to shout out the excellence that’s happening in their buildings, and saying that yes, our students in Montana are ready for you. They’re ready for college. They are ready for career. And yes, they are ready for community. They’re ready for their lives. I also want to say that I was
at the University of Montana for the Montana World
Affairs Counsel Academic World Quest Challenge. I want to give a shout out
to our Lieutenant Governor. I want to give him a report card for his reading skills ability, especially when it
comes to foreign policy, and all the wonderful, delightful names that are across our globe. He did a phenomenal job. We had 400 students across our state that were there in teams. And I was very honored to be the closing remarks. And so I was very quick in my remarks. But it was so extraordinary
to see these students understand that they have, we’re passing the torch to them when it comes to civics education. Regarding civics education, we are in the process. It’s been close to 20 years since our civics standards have been renewed, revitalized. So we’re dusting them off. Many of you in the room, we would like to have that discussion of what do
civics education in Montana look like today. And what should it look
like in the future. If you would like to partake in a meeting, in a committee, we’ll reach out to you. You may not have to reach out to us, but we would reach out to you so that you can have that participation. I also want to give a shout out, just before we get off
the Montana World Affairs meeting that was at the university. A shout out to the
Gardner High School team. This is the second year in a row that they won this event. And they’re on to represent Montana at the national competition. It’s so important that we are who we are in Montana. We know people from all over our state. And it’s extremely important that we give a shout out
to our rural communities. So go girls of Gardner. Council of Deans, I want to also say that we’re revitalizing our partnership with them, making sure that our
teacher preparation programs understand what we’re doing in K12. That we use our expertise to
the foremost of our students. And I want to also say
that I’m very blessed and honored to be serving
on the search committee for the new dean for the University of
Montana in Education. So thank you for that. Great opportunity. And we also, with Governor Bullock, we sent out a press release this week to superintendents and trustees, and education leaders, encouraging them to implement
computer science programs across our state. You know, we are here in K12 education to enrich the minds and bodies of our students
in children across the state. But we also have a responsibility to fulfill what is in the
job market at this point. And we know computer science is something that is not going to go away. It’s something that we use socially, that we communicate in our businesses. And providing a pathway in K12 education is something that I
believe is a responsibility that we have. So I want to applaud the governor in wanting all to know that again, this discussion of enriching our students across our state is something that shows great government. It’s not just in one executive branch. It’s in all of our branches in government. And I also want to share that we have an employee that
we are in the search for, that will be shared within our two bodies. This person will straddle your world and my world in K12. That was a commitment that
I had early on with you. And it will be a membrum of understanding. I’m using of FTE that’s in my shop to have this go forward. Will be housed in our career technical education component that serves our secondary. And I believe with the portal discussion that we have going forward with the ACT, that’s going to be deployed in less than 20 days, that this partnership, I am very, very secure with. And I’m very excited that I sit at this table. And it is my commitment to
continue sitting at this table. I want to participate. As my mother said, you don’t get anything done unless you show up. I apologize for my tardiness today, Chair, and members, but it is my commitment that K12 is in the room for you. And with that, if there are any questions on any of the legislative
packet that I handed out or any of my comments, I would be happy to stand. Thank you very much, Chair Albrecht. – Thank you superintendent Arntzen. And thank you for
continuing to participate in our meetings, and being an active voice for education. We appreciate it. Any questions? Sorry. Commissioner Christian. – Madam Chair, I’d just like to make a comment and add my voice to this shared position. You know, we really did
some ground breaking work with Dr. Lacy, department of labor, where agencies actually
talked to each other. We shared an employee, and we learned where we
need to help each other, support each other. That truly worked incredibly well for us. We have Seri Smiley continuing with the great work that is just been incredibly valuable as we move forward looking for ways that we, as a university system, can work with department of labor to meet workforce needs. And now through this new opportunity, work with K12, that we can create a continuum, a pipeline that starts at the kindergarten level, and moves through what ultimately fills the Montana workforce, and strengthens our economy. And so this next phase of that, as I look at it coming out of our office, and we’ve committed to help fund that FTE. But it’s a joint position where we’ll work together day in and day out. Someone dedicated to
the cause to see how K12 is interacting, how K12, and how we’re working together from higher ed. I think it will be equally as valuable as the gains that we’ve
seen in our previous ones. So that will move forward, and we’re excited about
those opportunities. Thank you with that. – Superintendent Arntzen, I’m curious if you could comment on how you feel we are addressing
the teacher shortage need throughout Montana, particularly
in our rural communities. – Thank you very much with that question. I know there is a lot of work, chair and members of the board, in this realm. My job is to find solutions. So we’ve had a lot of discussion. I know things are housed within OCHE that have been working towards this issue. And there are multiple things
that are in the legislature. We had one of our education
meetings in the morning, that is that bimonthly meeting, and we have six bills
that are working its way through the system right now. One is a grow your own. One is something to deal with when you get into education as a teacher. One is also, or two of them are in the retirement system. So when you come out of education, would you like to come back. And what are the hurdles that might prohibit that. How is it that we can maintain a system of education knowing that the knowledge
of a quality teacher is maintained across the lifespan of a teacher. I also know within the licensing, that we hold about 15,000 licenses in the state of Montana. And that’s in leaders, as well as there are in classroom leaders. We are looking to make sure that that value added of endorsements, of credentials, of understanding that they come into us with multiple gifts. We want to shout out what
those gifts could be, in badging of some sort, to share then at the local district that that teacher has more value. We do know that more than 90% of a school’s entire budget is based on personnel. And that’s that quality educator that everyone would like
in front of their children. So it is important then that we understand the economic aspect of it, but also the retention, keeping teachers, as also as maintaining the pedagogy. And that’s why I had mentioned, chair, about the deans, the colleges. It’s very important to me that when they come out and they finish their Praxis test, that they’re not done, that there are multiple
things throughout their phase of that licensing period that we can work with them, and encourage them to retain them. And I believe that’s where we are. So we’re very much into that space. And I may have given you
more information than needed. But I’m, as a teacher of 23 years, my mom and dad a teacher, it’s something that I think we discuss around our kitchen tables a lot. I know it was in my life. And we’ll continue to do so. And I’m very passionate about this. – Thank you. And I know moving forward that we have such an opportunity to try to draw those educators so that we can
keep them in our state to serve our state and our students. Regent Lozar. – Thank you Madam Chair. Superintendent Arntzen, you know one of the primary
priorities for the board has been for the last six or
seven years dual enrollment. And probably one of our favorite
parts of our board meetings is to see the progress in dual enrollment across the state. Going back to I think
a meeting in September, we looked at sort of the classes of the schools that we have in the state of Montana and their participation
in dual enrollment. And I think it was 100%
was class double A. And almost 100% class A, or is growing. B and C were around 50%. And just in terms of thinking about rural teachers and
growing that part of K12, what do you think we can do as a board, or in partnership with you to provide more of those opportunities in our smaller schools? – Thank you very much for that, Board Chair and Regent Lozar. I believe coming back to what
I just was passionate about, it’s the teacher. The teacher that is closest to the student to show those opportunities going forward. Not so much day to day, but where is that outlook going to be for that student. Not just after graduation, but prior to. That acknowledgement should
happen in middle school. So discussing more of our, of those 800 schools that I had annotated in my opening, the vast majority of those, five sixths of that are very rural schools. And that’s, that’s, is that low hanging fruit? I do believe it is. It’s hard work to be able to achieve and pick that
wonderful fruit that’s there. But, we are emphasizing, and I do believe that the
partnership that we have is going to put even more on to that. I don’t want to put more on
to the back of a teacher. But I want to show an opportunity, reward teachers for this work in dual enrollment. Because ultimately, the
reward goes to the student. And I think that’s why
we are all educators is because we see that light bulb and we see the wonderful
things that can happen to students with students, for students. Thank you regent. – Thank you superintendent Arntzen. Any other questions? Thank you again for being here, and thank you for your
advocacy for education, K12 and beyond. At this moment, we have a new guest in the room. Welcome Governor Bullock. It’s great to have you here with us today. And I would like to turn it over to you. And also personally, thank
you for the opportunity that I have had to serve in this capacity. Thank you. – Thank you Chair Albrecht, and members of the Board of Regents, and all of you for being here. Thanks for fording me and commissioner a little bit of time today. And seeing your agenda, it is certainly full and packed. And it also underscores all the good work that you’re all doing. So I so appreciate your continuing commitment to not only the university system, but indeed the entire state. I think I’ll kick things off with a little update from my perspective on the legislative session. And I may plow some of the ground that the superintendent did as well. But we’re so pleased last week to actually already get to sign what the statutorily required
inflation increase was for our K12 schools. And at times, it all started
to sound like mumbo jumbo, but that’s another $77 million over the next two years that will be going in to our K12 system. And it’s exciting news
from my perspective, first off, because our
schools will be getting the resources they need to make those basic necessary investments in our kids, many of whom, if we’re doing our job right, will be attending higher
education institutions in the great state of Montana. But it’s also exciting from my perspective because it underscores that education ought not, and is not necessarily a
partisan issue in Montana. When legislators on
both sides of the aisle worked quickly to get
this bill to my desk, both to ensure that schools have the certainty in their budgeting, but also to make sure the
school funding never becomes a political bargaining chip. Well, I think even, like that’s the good news. It fell short in a couple of areas that I helped see, including like inflationary increases
for special ed funding and the continuing challenges in a state of 147,000 square miles, making sure that we can
recruit quality teachers into rural areas through the quality educator loan repayment program. It’s a positive sign that whether democrat or republican, that we all recognize the important need to be investing in our education system. And when it comes to the
higher education budget and the proposals that we put forth this legislative session, I think the same sentiment
really has been echoed thus far. Education appropriation sub committee accepted our request for tuition freeze, supported funding for
high set preparation, our Tribal Colleges. And they did accept some of our requests for need based aid of two million instead of five million. It doesn’t mean we
still don’t have a long, lot of work to do on what could be a long road ahead. House appropriations
committee opens its hearing on house bill two just this morning. We’ll certainly do our work, at least through my administration’s side, to try to ensure that tuition freeze stays in the
final product of the budget. And we’ll keep fighting
to see if we can get the full five million I requested for need based aid. And that’s also where I think your continued support and
efforts are certainly critical. Freeze in college in state college tuition prevents what’s effectively
a tax increase on 28,000 working families
all across our state. And both the freezing of college tuition that we’ve been able to do for the last six years, coupled with increased
investments in higher ed has led to Montana having
the fourth lowest tuition and fees in the nation. But also if you look over the last decade. And this isn’t to diminish
any of the challenges that any of the institutions
of higher education have had, and the need to continue to
be making those investments. But if you look over the last decade, I think it still holds true that on average, state
investment in higher education has declined by about 17%. And we’re one of four states that have held our own, or even increased. So, I think it’s also
important to underscore that when we’ve worked with higher ed to say let’s freeze college tuition, the endeavor and the effort
hasn’t been to freeze the efforts of higher ed. It’s been to take additional state dollars that wouldn’t have otherwise been in there to supplant what would have been if indeed you would have been
increasing college tuition. I think that we have to continue
to build on that progress this legislative session. And we have to join the 49 other states in providing state funded
need based financial aid. That even though we’ve worked so hard, you collectively, the education units, Board of Regents, and the legislature has worked so hard to try to make sure that affordability isn’t going to be shaping an individuals life. Don’t kid yourself. It still does. And I think it is, for all that we do, it is a real mark against us when we don’t have need based aid. Now the state doesn’t do it alone. And to those of you from
the foundations too, I am so grateful that the foundations agreed to
match the state’s investment. And we hear, I hear far too often the state legislature skin in the game, or at the state capital. And the efforts of the
university foundations really shows that it’s not just talk. And so pleased, so let’s make sure that we get
that $5 million investment, make it a total of 10 million better opening the doors of
access to higher education to all Montanans. I also was so pleased to
see that the senate so far has passed senator bill Barath bill to make the six mil levee permanent. I think you can all celebrate, and indeed all of Montana can celebrate the results of the six mil levee election. It underscores to me that folks in all corners of this
147,000 square mile state, that our business community, everybody understands the
importance of higher education to not only the present of this state, but also to the state’s future. While that election really
was a testament to that, I think that getting rid
of the decennial vote would relieve the amount
of uncertainty for both the university system and campuses, as well as for the executive
and legislative branches after eight decades now of taking this measure
to the people of Montana for vote. It’s clear that Montanans
support our university system. It’s time to make that
cornerstone of higher education funding permanent. Now one thing I think that we still have a lot more work to do from my perspective, appropriations sub
committee didn’t include this point any funds for publicly funded preschool
in their initial work on the budget. But I think the road’s still a long road, and there’s plenty of time to
negotiate preschool funding into the budget. This legislative session, I propose an investment of #30 million of the biennium in voluntary, high quality preschool for four year olds all across the state. That includes eight million to continue the Stars preschool program that serves at least 400 kids through Head Start Programs, preschool programs in Head Start, and also high quality
community based providers. We’re fortunate last legislative session to get $6 million for pilot program. And I think what that was doing in part was to do a proof of concept to say does this work
in a state like ours. And what we saw is it can be successful in both rural and urban areas with a high demand in communities of all sizes for readily
available childcare options. That first two years of the pilot, 17 programs serving our largest towns, like the Head Start in Billings, some are small like Troy public schools, 93% of the participating preschoolers walked out kindergarten, are ready for kindergarten. We also know that kids who
are ready for kindergarten are more likely to read at grade level, graduate from high school, earn more money as adults. Our proposal also includes 22 million over the next two years to include four year children in the state’s
school funding formula. Under the model, the public schools would
voluntarily would choose to offer high quality preschool program will see funding for
every student eligible who enrolls. I remain optimistic that legislators on
both sides of the aisle recognize the importance of this, recognize that 92%, or 92% of child’s brain growth happens before they even
enter into our K12 system. But if you’re not kindergarten ready, you’re half as likely to be
at grade level by third grade. Not grade level by third grade. Four times more likely to
drop out of high school. I had the opportunity to
take a couple senators to Alabama this year. They’re spending well over
$100 million each year on early childhood education. They have the model. And it underscored to me that
this isn’t a partisan issue. I met the majority leader, the state senate who was there to speak to us, and he goes yeah, we got eight
democrats in our senate, and that’s eight too many. (laughter) But they recognize the investment and the difference that it makes. And had the opportunity, it was just a couple weeks ago, at the National Governor
Association meeting. Part of the White House discussion was on workforce. And when they say if you really want to
talk about workforce, you can’t wait until they’re either coming
to your colleges or not. This is where you start for two reasons. One of which is what we’re doing with kids then is gonna shape their
opportunities in the future. But also, and we saw it, had the chance to visit
most of those pilots. And I’ll never forget like a woman in, it was Lewistown who said to me, you know, I make too
much for the Head Starts, even if the lists are too long. And I don’t make enough
for quality program. What keeps me in the workforce, when the number one thing I hear, 3.7% unemployment from business is our biggest challenge is
the workforce challenge. But she said what keeps
me in the workforce is knowing that I can take my child to this quality program that was set up through the Stars pilot in Lewistown. So I also appreciate that it’s been a long road, both in higher ed, saying that yeah, we got to
protect and invest in higher ed, but your efforts along the way in underscoring how important this is, not just to higher ed, but indeed to our entire state. I’d also touch briefly on our work with ensuring, and it’s
work that each of you are doing on your campuses, and OCHE is doing ensuring the students and workers have clear pathways to a good paying jobs. We formed what we call
the Future Ready Cabinet last summer. It includes Superintendent
of public instruction. It included the commissioner
of higher education. And we’re delving deep into making sure that we
have robust partnerships across both education private sector and state government to strengthen our state’s talent pipeline. And we have an incredible
story to tell in Montana. I mean the efforts of working together, and also saying that these aren’t problems we’ll deal with years down the line. But coming to the table collectively and saying how do we come with solutions, not problems. I think those partnerships, and having folks engaged to make sure that four year degrees are setting students on
those good paying paths to fulfilling careers. But also in expanding opportunities for two year degrees, one year certificates, apprenticeships and others. Part of that certainly
includes that launch of the one, two, free
dual enrollment program last fall with Commissioner Christian. Certainly exciting that the spring of 2018 enrollment, dual
enrollment’s the highest ever at 3,125. And we can talk about numbers, but recognize behind
every one of those numbers is also some kids who would
have never even thought that they were college material. But you’re opening up
the gates of access then. You can be fundamentally
changing the paths. And it’s not, you know, when we launched that, we did it at my alma mater across the street at Helena High. And we did it in a welding class. Helping kids recognize the
paths that they could have to productive careers and lives right here in Montana. I’d also, we need to continue reaching out to those Montanans who have some credit, but no degree. We know that 125,000 Montanans are in this situation. Nearly 9,000 have already earned 100 credits or more, yet didn’t receive a degree and are no longer enrolled
in our university system. That’s darn close to a bachelors degree that they’ve already earned. And more than would be needed
for an associates degree. Similarly, almost 5,000, 4,951 resident students earned, started a two year degree program in our Montana university system, earned 45 or more credits, yet didn’t earn a degree and are no longer enrolled in the MUS. So pleased to President Bodnar that the University of Montana, and the Missoula job search are reaching out to these folks to become an alum pilot, to see if additional education or training could help improve their
economic situation, fill those in demand jobs. In Missoula, the pilot has great potential to meet that attainment goal. But a time where we are
getting more and more where training matters, and degrees matter. This is a ripe population to ensure that even if, especially those folks that already earned the darn degree. Even if they don’t think they need it now, if we can reach out to them, in a changing economy, that could be what keeps them and their families sustainable. So I hope that at some point building off of what
we’re doing in Missoula, that we can take that
to even greater scale. And based on the work of
the future ready cabinet, we’ll also be coming back to the board later this spring with revised attainment
goals and strategies. And you all have been doing such good work in those efforts. I hope you’ll join me, not
just endorsing the plan, but saying let’s say how do we meet it. How do we make sure that
we’re not just looking in the next one year or two years. But to attain things. Earlier this week, I had the opportunity, I’m currently serving as a chair of the National
Governor’s Association. So we had one of the regional workshops on my Chair’s initiative, which is called Good Jobs for All Americans. And we had workforce folks, and some folks from higher education from, I don’t know, 15 of the states
for the regional workshop. And we’re looking at finding sort of the innovative practices that governors and states and educational institutions can implement to ensure that we’re really preparing
for the future of work, addressing needs of mid career workers, also focusing on solutions that work for rural America. I heard a lot in great ideas. But it’s also clear that Montana’s in the front
lines of doing this work. It isn’t waiting for somebody
else to figure it out, that you’re engaged in
it each and every day. We can always do more, but certainly so pleased and
grateful for the commitment of the leadership of
the university system. The leadership of the
individual universities, and all of our colleges, and the folks that work for them all across the state. In closing, I was thinking about, I think it was six years ago, my kids were six, eight, and 10. And their first big hike
that I ever took them to was to Iceberg Lake. And I bribed them along, like we stopped every 150 yards and have a couple Swedish fish. And it’s just me and the three kids. It was a hot day. It’s exhausting. And we had our share of
meltdowns along the way, but so much excitement when
we got to Iceberg Lake. And we’re sitting out on the shore, and after, I think two of them were
actually brave enough to actually jump in. But who do I talk to but Fran Albrecht, and had just a great conversation there. And that was before Fran Albrecht became Regent Albrecht. And there are parts of those moments that I kind of call sacred
intersections in life that somehow, something
brings you to a place. And just both the kindness and the decency of that conversation, and then later as we were
looking for a new regent from Missoula, and when somebody said what about this Fran Albrecht. I’m like what about Fran Albrecht. (laughter) I was just excited when I had the opportunity to at least advance your
nomination to the senate. And when it was confirmed, excited about you being on this board then as I am now. And I know that none of you do it for the fame and fortune. But Regent Albrecht and Chair Albrecht, I so appreciate the commitment that you’ve made and what you’ve given of yourself, of your time, of your effort to make sure that
everything that we’re doing through this university system is not only important for today, but for time long after you’re here. So thank you so much for your great service. Thank you all of you for your service. (applause) I probably talked so long, I mean if there are any questions, I’d be happy to answer any of them. But I don’t know where you
all are on your schedule and how much I screwed it up. – Well, Governor Bullock, I just I want to sincerely extend my humble thanks for your belief in me. I kept saying are you sure you want me. But it has truly been an honor to serve this amazing
state in this capacity. And I thank you for the confidence in giving me this opportunity to serve. I also thank you for running
that bear off that day. Do you remember that? – Yes I do. – We encountered, we both encountered the same bear. And we’re alive to tell. But again, also I just
want to learn so much along the way, but, certainly we couldn’t do
this without your belief in education and prioritizing that. So your partnership along the way has made our efforts that much more easy to really celebrate what we all need to do together for education across the lines. So thank you so much for all you do in service to Montana. And thank you for your commendation. Actually, this is perfect timing, unless we have other questions or anything for the governor. We’re so glad that we can have you here, and you’ve taken the time. If there’s no other questions, we will actually take a break after Regent Sheehy. Go ahead. – Governor Bullock. – Regent Sheehy. – I’m wondering, are you going to Butte and are the Helena High Bangles going to beat the Butte Bulldogs in the opening round of the state tournament? – So the, the answer is yes to both. (laughter) My, my oldest daughter, Caroline, plays on Helena High’s basketball team. And in some respects, she plays behind last years
Gatorade player of the year who’s going to the University
of Montana next year, Jamie Pickens, who fundamentally, and this is a testament also to you. Like Jamie is just this delightful young woman who broke
Helena high scoring record last year at our last
weekend at divisionals. And I think she could have
gone anywhere in the country. She’s that good a player. But since she was in third grade, her dream was to play at the Lady Gres. So she didn’t look at
really any other school. So I will be doing my most important job this afternoon and this evening, and that being the dorky dad wearing a button with my daughter on. And I’m hoping, I know I
represent all of Montana, but I’m hoping that the Bangles
win state for the third time this Saturday night. Thanks again. – Own the dorky dad. Own it. Thank you. And we will go ahead and recess, and return with our next agenda item. Let’s go ahead and take a 10 minute break and return at approximately 10:40. Thanks so much. (group chatter) Good morning everyone. I would like to invite us to all return so we can enjoy our next presentation. The panel What’s up Helena. And we have a very exciting group that I am very eager to learn from. So at this point, I would like to turn it back to Dean Lacy who will introduce our panelists. Thank you. – Thanks Madam Chair. Helena College is so, so fortunate to have incredibly supportive community of Helena, and to have amazing partnerships across the community that benefit the college, and vice versa. It allows the college to contribute effectively to the community. We’ve got a great panel of
community partners here, amazing group of people. Tyler Ream, superintendent
of Helena Public Schools, Ron Whitmoyer, superintendent
of East Helena Public Schools, Jessica Hayes, Performance
management director at Boeing Corporation, Annie Chase, Human Resources director at Dick Anderson Construction, and Kelly Cresswell, executive director for Reach Higher Montana, chair of the Helena
area chamber of commerce workforce and education sub committee, and as well as the Helena WINS Initiative. So welcome, and we’ve asked the panelists to speak to their experiences with Helena College and
the university system. And so basically for their first question, based on your or your
organization’s experience in working with Helena College, and or with other institutions in the Montana university system, what are the best examples of things that are working well for
serving the Helena community? And Tyler, would you like to start off? – I moved the mic so it works. So, thank you for the opportunity. I feel like you know, in the spirit of K12 education, we should say what’s up back to you. Thanks for this opportunity. So I think the One, Two, Free, and obviously anything
that is dual credit, anything that provides our students with a belief that potentially
they can go further than maybe they even have the vision for from an educational standpoint. And I think obviously
partnership with Helena College has been able to provide
that for a lot of kids where I think they get to a
certain point in high school, how far can I go. How far will this journey take me? Dual credit gives them that opportunity to get a foothold in to something that maybe they think they
don’t have a part in. And that’s been a difference maker for so many of our kids. That’s one example. And then the other example is is just having a partner like Helena College right downstairs. If you get lost and get a moment to get lost, to go downstairs and
see our Access program that exists here. And those are students that, for whatever reason, had challenges in their K12 education, particularly in high school, and were able to find foothold here in the Access Program. And they actually take their nine through 12 classes here on campus. You can’t find them, and that’s by design. You just walk around this building. You wouldn’t know the difference between a high school class and a Helena College class. The college has done a terrific job of inviting them and involving them in the
day to day student life. And that has been a game changer, again, in helping students achieve something that is further and beyond what they thought was possible. So that’s two examples. – Good morning. I’m Ron Whitmoyer from East Helena. You need to know just a
little bit of my background before we go too far, because you’re gonna think that maybe I’m ignorant, or uneducated as I go along. And the reason being is that I don’t have much experience at this level. East Helena just recently became K12 school district. Or Pre K-12 school district thanks to our governor. We, we are in the process of learning what dual credit even means, what advanced placement even means, and how to provide those opportunities to kids that we don’t have yet. Our first freshman class will enroll this fall. We’re excited about it. It’s an amazing learning curve. We’re drinking from a fire hose. And I want to tell you that I’m very thankful that Dean Lacy has added
pressure to that fire hose because he reached out to us in August and said okay, here we go. How do we coordinate? How do we collaborate? How do we partner on
advanced placement classes, dual credit classes? How do we reach the kids that are right now, they just
registered last week. Kids are already asking us what dual credit classes do we have. What opportunities do we
have for advanced placement? What do you have for us in nursing and other health careers? What do you have for us related to aeronautics? What can we, what can we learn? And they’re just eager to learn. I met with a group of
these students last week. And I remember why I
got into this profession after meeting with these kids. They’re asking questions that 13 year olds shouldn’t even know about. So we know we’ve got our challenges because these kids are way
smarter than we realize. And providing those opportunities. But like I said, the dean has already reached out to us. And we’re excited to work and learn, and partner with the college. But I don’t have a lot to add
about what I already know, because that’s nothing. (laughter) – So I’m Jessica from the Boeing Company. And I think probably the biggest
strength for our company is the partnership we have
with Helena College. That partnership’s been around
since Boeing has been here. Almost 10 years now. But really, they do a really great job of partnering with industry to ensure that their
programs are meeting the current and future requirements
of the workforce for us. And so their machining program, I mean it’s almost like the
Boeing machining program, a little bit, which is really great for us though to be able to have that
kind of partnership. We’ve hired somewhere around 40 students right out of that machine program in the last 10 years, which is pretty amazing for
a community of this size. And then beyond just Helena College, we’ve also started a partnership with Flathead Valley Community College, where I think we’ll have a
similar type of relationship as we build that in the
years going forward. So I think, from an industry perspective, being able to have a seat at the table, and have the colleges open to our perspectives on what
we need, the skills, to be coming out of the college programs is essential to ensuring
that we have people that we can hire and get into productive positions in a very fast time period. – Good morning. I am Annie Chase with Dick
Anderson Construction. I think one of our
biggest strengths lately has been acknowledging the fact that unemployment rate is low. Finding qualified skilled
labor as carpenters, project engineers has not been easy. So internally, we did an assessment of how can we grow and spread awareness within the trades industry. So we have partnered with
the local high schools here in Helena. We’ve developed and
internship program with them. So we allow the students to come on site and tour our projects and work closely with our other carpenters and laborers, and superintendents. And it exposes them to the opportunities that they have within
the trades industries. The career path that they can take, and they acknowledge that they
do have a successful future within the trades industry. We’ve also allowed them to job shadow higher level individuals, so project engineers, project managers. So if they don’t necessarily
want to work in the field, they get an idea of what that
office aspect looks like, which is really important. Another huge success that we have had within the last three years is partnering with a local Montana college to develop an internal
apprenticeship program. So we can internally grow
our carpenters and laborers within our company. We did recently register this program with the state. So it’s a state recognized
apprenticeship program. So we can now develop and
grow our internal employees because it’s obviously very hard to find qualified, qualified work. So the biggest thing is spreading
awareness of the trades, partnering with the high schools, going down to the middle school levels, spreading the awareness, letting them know that the two year programs are out there. You do have a successful career path within the trades industry. So again, the biggest thing is just spreading the awareness and letting the students know that they have, they have options out there for them. – Good morning, I’m Kelly Cresswell with Reach Higher Montana, and co-chair of the Helena WINS Initiative with Kirk Lacy, Dr. Lacy. So obviously, I think that Helena WINS is something that is going
very well for Helena right now. This initiative was designed and intended to be employer driven, and it is. We’re currently focused
on four industry sectors. Manufacturing, which
is chaired by Jessica. Construction, chaired by Annie. Information technology and healthcare. We’ve got lots of other
pieces of Helena WINS that are coming together, including a summer jobs program that we’re partnering
with the American Jobs for America’s Youth to implement this summer in Helena. That program has three main components. Students are 16 to 19 years old and will be compensated for completing an employability skills training. That’s about four hours long. The employers who are involved, and there are many employers
who are excited about this, have agreed to pay these youth workers at least $9 per hour. And each student in the program will have a mentor assigned to them either from the business
where they’re placed, or a trained community mentor from one of our other community partners. We’re really excited about
that particular aspect of the work we’re doing in Helena WINS because again, it builds
on the things that Annie and Jessica have talked about, and that Tyler and Ron talked about, in terms of exposing students to career opportunities that are available right here in Helena, and how they might prepare
for those opportunities. So we’re really proud of it. I would also say that
Helena is a community that I think really values education. And some of that might be because we have OCHE and OPI right here in Helena. But we really do have
exceptional educators at all levels, and some really tremendous people who participate in the education process. ACT recently announced their college and career
readiness champions for Montana. And two of the four are from Helena, including Annie. And he is our employer champion from ACT this year, and our K12 educator champion is Jim Weber from Capital High School, who teaches welding and machining. So there’s lots of
excellence to go around. And we’re pretty fortunate
to have all that right here. – Great, thank you. In addition to the things
that are going well, from your experience with Helena College and the university system, what are the best
opportunities for improvement and how we can better serve the community? – So I would say short answer to that would
be context, context, context. I would say in a pre-cal
class two days ago, they were performing an activity that I could not describe because it’s been a long time. But I sat down next to a student. I asked him why is this important. What is this in relation to? And he looked at me like I was you know, like I had just asked him the craziest question ever, right. And I think what we’re
seeing in education, I hope we’re seeing in education, is a blending between the formal and the informal education. I think there was a time and place where you had your formal education, and then you went off to work. And I think we’re seeing
this period of time where it’s formal, blends into informal, which may lead back to formal, which may be. And I think that’s what we’re
seeing with our students. But without context, without their understanding of what essentially becomes abstract, that was abstract in that pre-cal class. He could not apply that
to why is this important for my future. There’s a young man who
graduated mid year here from our Access Program. And he had a really worn
out Dick Anderson cap that he wore every single day. He reengaged in his formal education because of Access. And he wore the Dick Anderson cap, which started a conversation
one day with him. And he wanted to continue his education through Helena College, and eventually join Dick Anderson because of a work experience that he had in high school where he was on a job site with Dick Anderson, got the hat that he’s been
wearing for the five years since. But it provided him context
and a connection point for what was abstract, making that a concrete thing. And I think that’s an
opportunity that we have to work together to provide
students more formal concrete opportunities to connect that what is essentially
abstract formal education to something that drives a vision. – Now I wished I’d have
started with the microphone because that’s a hard act to follow. (laughter) Nice job, Tyler. Simply, simply to add that just continuing to reach out just as Helena College did to the schools, reaching out to businesses, trying to network all of us together is the way that we can make improvements in what
we’re currently doing. As Tyler described, the way to feed these
students what they need is to seek greater opportunities
throughout the community. And those opportunities are in places we never even dreamed of yet. And not only will the adults lead us, but if we listen to the kids, as Tyler just described, if we listen to the kids, they can lead us and
show us the way as well. They know what they want. We just have to be flexible enough and creative in our thinking enough to do that. And like I mentioned earlier with the Helena College, with them
reaching out to us so early in August, before we even
started to think about what our freshmen were going to take in the new high school. With him reaching out then, it gave us the time and the opportunity to think forward and not sit back and wait
for something to happen, but be creative in our thinking. And I thank Kirk and his staff for making that opportunity available. And I just met Jessica next to me here, which is one of those
network connections that business needs to be involved in this. We need to learn from them. And that’s another
opportunity that we have. What are the skills that you need that we can start planning for now and not wait until suddenly
now you need those skills. It doesn’t work very well. And every educator sitting
at the table here knows that. – So Tyler and Ron are right on. I completely agree with their comments. To add to that, I would say
some other opportunities, from my perspective, would be soft skills. And I know that a lot of the schools are making efforts to, to talk with students about soft skills and try and help the students that understand what soft skills are really important in the workforce. From a Boeing perspective, you know, we say we can
teach people how to do the technical parts of their jobs. But you know, it’s really
difficult as an employer to teach them those soft skills. I’m sure it’s difficult
for educators too, as well. But I think that’s something
the more that we can get into programs the better. In addition to that, I think further partnerships with industry to ensure that programs are either created or updated for future skills needs is very important for business to be successful and have the workforce ready that we need at the right time. Those are probably the biggest ones. Maybe also, this probably
goes more to the K12 system, but the career awareness
that Annie was talking about. You know, we have in the
manufacturing sector, as being the sector
leader for Helena WINS, and having been in manufacturing my entire career, I can say we have a perception
of manufacturing careers. We have a problem with the
perception of those careers. And people don’t maybe always understand, even adults, what manufacturing careers are. What are the jobs that are
involved in those careers. But also the working conditions. A lot of people’s minds
go to working conditions from 30, 40, 50, 60 years ago. Where today, there’s a lot of technology in manufacturing. My manufacturing fabrication specialists, they basically use a computer to operate a machine to make parts. And I think that perception is something that as an industry we need to overcome. And we certainly need to
partner at both the K12, as well as the post, the post high school
education systems to do that. – I think all three of the
individuals that have spoke have hit on some great points. And I can only reiterate
everything they said. It goes back to, for us in construction, spreading the awareness, letting the students know that they have, they have a career path
within the trades industry. I think it would be beneficial to have more career fairs within, or job fairs within the local high schools, middle schools. It allows us as employers to get out there and spread
awareness of the students. And it allows them to start thinking about what career
path they want to take at such a young age. I think the Helena WINS
is a great opportunity for employers to invest in the community and reaching out. It would be amazing to have
more employers involved from a construction standpoint. But I think it goes back to spreading the awareness and letting the students know that they do have options within the trades industry, and showing them wages and career paths, and how successful you can be. And I completely agree
with the soft skills. It would be amazing to
teach the students what being on time means within a job. Good work ethic, things of that nature. They can come out and
have the best skillset, but it boils down to work ethic. And we can train anybody, but you have to have a solid foundation and knowing what being on time and things of that nature mean. – So I will say yes to what
the other panelists have said. And add to that that
I think an opportunity for improvement for Helena, and most likely other
communities across the state, is workforce attraction. If we do the math, we simply don’t have the number of people to fill some of the needs
that we have right now, and the needs that we’ll
have into the future. Knowing that colleges, of course, are very skilled and knowledgeable about recruitment of
people from other places, maybe outside of the state of Montana, and selling what Montana
is about to those students who come to Montana. I wonder if there is an opportunity for the business community, and for community groups to partner with the university system and with individual units on how we promote our communities outside of our borders to
attract more people to come. In the Venn diagram in my mind, I obviously see that
there are some differences to recruiting workers and
to recruiting students. But I think there is
definitely an overlap, and I think that we could
all learn from one another. So I think that is a
tremendous opportunity. I also think we have some opportunities around pre-apprenticeship
and apprenticeship, and again through Helena WINS, and a partnership with AJ, who is one of our Helena WINS partners. We are applying for a
youth apprenticeship grant through the partnership for
advancing youth apprenticeship. And we’re really excited about that. Our proposals focus on
building pre-apprenticeship opportunities for students
in IT and healthcare. And we hope that we will learn some things that we can replicate in other industries, as well as other communities. – Thanks Kelly. So this last question
is meant for an exchange between the regents and the panelists. If the panelists have
any additional insights or suggestions on how the university system, the regents, the institutions can
improve higher education in Montana. And regents, if you have
questions about our community, for our community panelists of what you’d like to ask of them, let’s open it up for the
last question that way. – [Chair Albrecht] Regent Tuss. – Thank you, Chair Albrecht. Thank you for being here. And we’ve had this particular agenda item on our agenda as a regular part of our agenda for the last couple of years. And I don’t know how you’re selected to be on this panel, but my guess is that we don’t have people on panels like this that don’t understand the power and value of higher education. However, I know that in coffee shops, and at the barber shop, and downtown as you’re
talking with colleagues and other business folks in the private sector. They’re probably talking about that ivory tower of higher education. And my goodness, you know, what are they doing. So outside of what we just
heard from all of you, what are we missing? What are folks like that telling you, boy if only higher education
in Montana did this, they’d have my support. Because sometimes I feel like
we’re preaching to the choir, and there’s a whole lot of
folks that aren’t in the choir. So what are we missing? What is that connection
with the business community that we don’t even,
aren’t even thinking of at this table? – So I’ll just continue the order here. (laughter) I’ll make it up on the fly. So that’s a really, that’s a good question. That’s a tough question. I think, and it kind of goes back
to the first question in some ways, I don’t know where it happens, and I don’t think it’s a concrete thing for any particular child as they go through their formal education where they decide what is next for them. I think back to where our students are
when they’re 18 years old, and I don’t know how
many of us in the room are exactly who we are today as to what our vision was
when we were 18 years old. It didn’t work out well for me. I’m supposed to be on the Lakers playing with Lebron James. (laughter) I haven’t got that call yet. But, but I think going back to
like the One, Two, Free piece, at some point, they decide that college is this thing that
exists for some students, but maybe not me. And then there’s a teacher, like a Jim Weber, and others, who enter their lives and they have a vision for
that 16, 17, 18 year old that they may not have for themselves. Then you step in and you provide a pathway that may not be the traditional 12th grade, enter freshman year. It may be 12th grade, Helena College, enter junior year. There’s multiple pathways that exist. And I think the more diverse and applicable and attainable those pathways can be for students, the more they break down
that kind of ivory tower that you mentioned. This idea that if I’m not there by the end of 12th grade, I’m not going. And I think the more
experiences that you can, the more structures that you can add that make that an
attainable thing for them, I think further wither way this idea that it’s, college is a one time thing, and if you don’t get in when you’re 18, you’re not going. And so that’s kind of
some initial thoughts to that question. – I would simply add to that a perspective from the community. I think you need to take
what the governor had to say earlier today with a statistics. Where he talked about we
have more people today than ever that are using
the university system in non-traditional ways. I think that we just need
to get that information out to the public. Getting that information out, and almost campaigning in a manner to show the successes and the creativity that
you all have created for opportunities for kids to access the ivory tower. I think you break down those barriers just simply with a perspective
from the community. And I think you’re well
on your way to doing that. And you have a great spokesperson in our governor to tell the story. – I always thought it was unfair pressure for an 18 year old to decide what they want to do with
the rest of their life, to Tyler’s point. We’re usually not good
at making that decision at that age. We’re not prepared for that. And I think, when I hear
the word ivory tower, what kind of really came to mind for me was through my experiences in my career and working with folks who have just gotten out of college, or towards the end of
their college career, it’s really that real
world experience, right. They tend to know more of
the theory behind things, and less about the real world
of how that actually gets applied. And in some cases, you know, that theory’s great, but it
doesn’t work in the real world. And they don’t have that knowledge yet. And there’s definitely balance between confining their thoughts, right, and preventing that diversity
from entering the workplace. But I think the more that
they can get some real world, hands on experience during their education, the more important it is. It gives them that perspective
that we talked about earlier about what they’re learning, and how that is applied in the real world. And it also, I think, enhances, it just enhances
their learning all together. It brings new ideas into
the educational space that might not have been there if they hadn’t experienced that. And we already see internships, and other types of work based learning happening in Montana. So it think continuing
that is really important. And I don’t think it’s one sided, right. I mean I think there’s a lot of folks working in the university system who would love for more employers to sign up to take interns or other apprentices and things like that. I think that it’s also a business issue, getting more businesses
engaged and on board. – I would completely agree with what Jessica said. It would be, it’d be nice to have some type of mentor for these students to be able to go to that they know their personality. They know what their interest is, and they know where their interest lies. What career path would
be best suited for them. I know when I was 18, applying for college, I was asked to declare a major when I was filling out
my college application. And it scared me because I didn’t know. I have interests in
multiple different areas, but I don’t know what course to take that would be beneficial for me. So being 18, I declared a certain major. And I ended up switching
it four different times. And letting students know that that’s okay. You don’t need to know right off the bat what you want to do for the
next 50 years of your life. And changing that down the road to what’s gonna suit you is important then. If I didn’t have my
family come to me and say this is what I see you doing. This is where your personality lies, I wouldn’t have graduated
with the degree that I did. So having somebody that
that student can go to early on in their schooling would be really beneficial, someone who really knows them, and knows what their interested in. I think that would be a
huge aspect to the students. – I’ll take a little
bit different approach and say that I think some of the ivory tower perspective may come down to the language
that we use around college and around education. And I’ll use dual
enrollment as an example. So I think that all of the terms around dual enrollment make a lot of sense to the people sitting around this table, and the people in this room because we’re closer to it. But if you’re a child in a family where you
will be the first person whom is considering college, and you hear dual credit, and dual enrollment, and concurrent enrollment, and advanced placement, and work based learning
and oh my goodness. What does it all mean? I think that that, that excludes people when
they don’t understand what we’re talking about. And I think that we need to find a way to present these opportunities to students and parents
that mean something to them. And that they understand if they are not already
part of this world. – I want to add real quickly to your question though. It’s not all on you. Right, that ivory tower. We’ve created that in
K12 education as well. We are still very much a
sort and classify system. If we weren’t, then you
wouldn’t have heard terms like you’re not college material, right. I mean so I think breaking down that is, and helping students see those pathways that are continuing and
evolving dynamic is important because I think, I don’t think it’s
something that was created necessarily at the
university system entirely. I think it was very much a K12 piece. I think the soft skills piece, and the grit, and all of these things. We decided this morning, one in three don’t come back. That’s grit. That’s perseverance. It’s finishing out. And so all of those pieces, to me, are coming together to make
for a different future leader for our community. And it’s not the square
college material piece that I think we’ve been working on for decades. So not all on you. – [Dean Lacy] So thanks regents for making time out of your schedule to hear from the community of Helena. And thanks to each of you for taking the time out of your busy schedules to share with us your insights. But most importantly, thanks for being such incredible partners. – [Chair Albrecht] Dean Lacy, real quickly. Regent Sheehy had one question, and then we’ll wrap up. Thank you. – Actually, I just kind of wanted to give you some feedback as well. Tyler, I think you asked
what’s up Board of Regents. One of the things that we’ve
heard about at this table is our private things like there’s a Yellowstone Strengths Academy, and different thing that
are being implemented by both employers and the education system to teach those soft skills. So there are some things out there that are addressing the soft skill problem that we hear about at this table from pretty much every what’s up. And then the other
thing I’d like to say is thank you so much. You’ve been sort of the, this community has been one of the greatest parts of our apprentice program. You’ve taught us that
apprentice ships work. You’ve taught us they can be long, long in existence with the Boeing project. And we’ve been trying to
do what you’re doing here across our system. So it’s nice to hear back that these relationships continue, that they’re successful, that they are leading to employment. And finally, in answer to one of the questions about how do we sell our communities. I want to complement Helena. One of the things that
isn’t mentioned today, and isn’t really on any of our plates. Helena has such a vibrant arts community. And I don’t know how that plays into education and business, but I will tell you that
from an outside perspective, looking at Helena, one of the things that we always notice is your arts community. So thank you. – Thank you Regent Sheehy. And again, Dean Lacy, thank you so much for
putting this together, and for your thoughtfulness, in inviting such a great, diverse group who clearly represent what we are seeking in that sort of engagement. And helping us on what our goal is. And together, we’re,
you’re moving it forward. So thank you so much for
your commitment to students and to the community and beyond. So thank you. (applause) At this point in the agenda, we are moving to our two year and community college committee. And my vice chair to the right, who chair’s that committee
is Regent Nystuen. – Thank you Madam Chair. A point of order, as far as schedule goes. Kirk, we note that its 11:20. And at 11:30, we are to
optional guided tour. Update on that? – Madam Chair, Regent Nystuen. I actually think we may be able to push on until about a quarter til to your committee, and then head straight to the airport campus, for those
interested in the tour. – Great. Thank you. For clarifying that. This morning, the two year education and community college committee has really and interesting update. We’re getting a lot of
attention these days in the halls of the legislature, the governor’s office, and elsewhere all over the state with regards to career
and technical education. Well that’s all we’re about this morning. And we’re gonna have a
great discussion about this. So with this, Deputy Commissioner Tessman, I’ll throw it over to you to talk about the Perkins Five Transition plan. Thank you. – Thank you Madam Chair, Regent Nystuen. And I just very quickly, I think the comments from
Jessica, Annie, Kelly, and our two superintendents spot on. I mean really, you think
about this morning. So far at this meeting, and two things stand out. One is the need for a kind of cradle to career, or P through W approach for our educational system. And the other thing that
stands out is partnerships. And I think right at the heart of all of that is our two year system. And certainly Helena College is a great example. One partnership that is of
particular interest right now is the partnership between
Montana university system and business and industry
across the state. And our two year community colleges focus on student success
in all sorts of ways. But really workforce
and economic development is front and center. It’s one of our three goals in our strategic plan for the
Montana university system. And our two year campuses
are doing a wonderful job. And we’re gonna talk about
career and technical education for our time in today’s committee meeting. We’re gonna do it in three ways. The first way is Jacque Treaster is gonna
talk a little bit about the Perkins Five Grant. And Perkins Five is really the main source of career and technical education funding in the state of Montana to the tune of about $6 million a year. And Jacque will walk us through some of current CTE activities and actually present a kind of transition
plan for Perkins Five. The second, and I think the most important element of our meeting, is going to be hearing from students, and their CTE experience on a couple of our two year campuses. And then I would encourage all of you who are interested consider taking an optional tour of the airport campus here at Helena College, which is just a terrific facility. So three parts. I’ll turn it over to
Jacque Treaster right now, who’s our director of career
and technical education and dual enrollment. Jacque. – Sorry, thank you Deputy
Commissioner Tessman, and Mr. Chair, members of the committee. I’m pleased to be here, and to be in front of you to take the time to really kind of brag on the CTE happenings in Montana. Our colleges and all the way down
through the high schools and middle schools are
doing some incredible work. And so I’m excited to share
with you some of that. And then like Deputy
Commissioner Tessman said, bring up a couple of students that can highlight their
experience with CTE. I think it’s important to
hear from them as well. So the first item on
the agenda is actually a Perkins Five transition plan. And this was sent to you all
a few weeks ago, I believe. Perkins Five, the reauthorization of this law, which happened in July 2018, required every state to
revisit their CTE state plans. And we are required to
write a four year plan, but that doesn’t take place
until the 2021 grant cycle. So we need something to get us through the 19, 20 grant cycle, which is coming up here in July. And we’d like to be able to continue to award Perkins funding, and so we need this transition plan to be approved by you all, as the board, and submitted to the US
Department of Education in order for us to keep
operating business as usual for Perkins for the 19, 20 grant cycle. So, I’m here for any questions on that transition plan that had been sent to you all. – Regent Rogers. – I have a really basic question. What’s the definition
of special populations? – Oh, thank you Regent Rogers. Mr. Chair, so I, there’s quite a lengthy definition and it does actually line up with what the special population
definition in SSAT is. And so there is a few
different populations, and they’re notably two were added in the most recent version of the law. One is homeless youth, and the other is youth with parents who
are active duty military. The rest of our special populations, you know, persons with disabilities, single parents, including pregnant women, and there’s a few others that
are listed in the law as well. – [Chair Nystuen] Regent Johnson. – Hi, just for followup. Last week on our committee call, we heard from some interesting conversations located around Missoula College and Bitterroot College. Maybe not today, but
would that be addressed in later on in an email, or at a further board meeting, how that conversation has been going. – Absolutely, Mr. Chair
and Regent Johnson. I believe Deputy Commissioner Tessman could speak to that. – Thank you. Regent Johnson, I think one that that’s at
the top of our priority list on the two year side is increased collaboration between our campuses. And I would very much expect, if I were in your chair, to get a good deal of outreach over the next several months. And some of it will certainly involve more work between Bitterroot College, Missoula College. And actually, I would lump
in the rest of our two year colleges and community colleges as well. It’s on our agenda, absolutely. Thanks for the question and the prompt. – Other questions or comments. Any other questions or comments from the campuses that are connected up with this? Well, with that, Jacque and Deputy Commissioner Tessman, shall we move on to the next segment? – Thank you, Mr. Chair, Regents, I think the next section will involve a bit more of an update on career technical education in the state of Montana. It will include those, the student presentations. And Jacque, I’ll just add that this board can absolutely
expect to be part of the state plan writing process over the next several months. So there’s a formal outreach process. So you all have a chance to chime in as we create this sort
of more permanent plan. – Thank you, Mr. Chair, members of the committee. So I have a few slides for you that are being pulled up. I can go ahead and get started. I know that we’re a
little crunched for time. Oh, there we go, okay. So I just want to give a
little bit of background. Can I have the next slide. Thank you. Just a little bit of background on what career and technical
education is in Montana, or CTE for short. So CTE really goes beyond
one year certificates, and two year degrees. A lot of the conversation
that’s around CTE kind of goes back sometimes to what traditionally has been considered vocational education, or Vo-ED. And we’re really trying to get away from that term because of the perceptions of, and kind of the ideas of what that brings up for people. CTE is no longer just shop class. So it goes much beyond that. We’re talking about bachelors degrees, masters degrees, PhD, MD, all of that can be considered CTE. CTE really considers labor market information
and workforce needs. This way we can specifically
address shortages in our state and regionally. And actually, federal funding
is now strongly linked to campuses and schools, and regions considering
the workforce needs in their own communities, state and nationally as well. Next slide please. So these infographics are
from the Good Jobs report from the Georgetown University Center on education and the workforce. If you’re interested
in reading this report, which I recommend. It’s really useful. You can view that at goodjobsdata.org. They provide a state by state analysis. And so this is the information that I pulled from the Montana page. The majority of workers in Montana with a good job don’t
have a bachelors degree in our state. The study also shows that over the past 25 years, Montana has added 26,000
skilled services jobs, and 4,000 blue collar jobs, all that don’t require a bachelors degree. So the amount of growth
of these types of jobs in our state over the
last couple of decades has been pretty significant. One of our goals is to
change the perception of what students and
parents have of what CTE is, and really show them that Montana
offers incredible pathways that lead to high wage, high skill, and in demand positions in careers that don’t necessarily require a four year degree, although some of them of course do. Perkins is one of the tools that we use in order to accomplish kind of changing these perceptions. So just a little bit of
background on Perkins. We saw the slide in September last time I was in front of you all. So Perkins is a federal
to state formula grant, as was mentioned earlier. We saw a little bit of an increase by about $300,000 for
the upcoming grant cycle. And so we’re at nearly
$6 million for the state. This is important for a state like Montana who depends on these
funds for CTE funding. Congress continues to fund this. And the fact that we’ve
been seeing increases over the last couple of years has been, has give us a lot of hope as far as what we can
accomplish with the program. Perkins serves over 5,000
high school CTE students and over 10,000 post secondary
CTE students in Montana. And we use Montana career pathways to define the Perkins programs of study. So these are the eligible programs that we’re able to fund at both the secondary
and post secondary level. These include, I don’t need to read through them all. They’re available on our website. But health, IT, education, advanced manufacturing, Ag sciences, health sciences. There are quite a few different pathways that we address. So this is just a list of
Perkins receiving institutions. You can see that the
reach is all over Montana. And again, this is just
post secondary institutions. The list of high schools
is much, much greater. And so while we have this slide up where you can see all of the colleges that participate, we’re actually going to
bring up a couple of students for you to give their perspective. The first is Wyatt Laprame
from Helena College. He’s a second year student
in the welding program, and has been president of the welding club for the last four semesters. He holds and externship as
the workforce development and community outreach
assistant at Helena College, is an associated student
of Helena College senator, and has been selected as a
Helena College student ambassador for the past two semesters. So if we can bring Wyatt up. – All right. I don’t have to introduce myself now that I was introduced. So we’ll just jump straight to it. So my experience here at Helena College was more of a last minute decision. My senior year, I was attending Capital High School. My instructor was Jim Weber, my welding teacher for three years at Capital High School. And just kind of thinking about what you guys were talking about earlier. It kind of touches up on what these business partners
we have in the community were just talking about. And if it wasn’t for Jim Weber, I would have never thought about going into Helena College. And if it wasn’t for Helena College, I never would have been put in these positions I’m in now with student ambassador, my externship, student senate, my welding club presidency. I would have never even
thought about that stuff. After I graduate from this program, I’ll continue my education to get a bachelor of applied science in trades management through MSU Northern. And that also touches up on what you guys have been talking about. I just, it kind of just
lines up, doesn’t it. And, (laughter) anyway, Helena College
has been a great college. The instructors, they have, there’s so much one on one time. The staff and faculty have, are really a student first kind of people. Helena College really portrays that. And I would like to say that on behalf of all the other students that attend here, they’d
say the same thing. My skills as a welder slash fabricator have increased exponentially. Lynn Ziegler, he’s my instructor over at the welding program. He really is committed to his students. And I know twice as much, I know 10 times more than I did coming than I did when I came in. And it’s just been quite the experience so far. And Helena College has helped me learn more management skills, leadership skills, soft skills, teamwork, and I just got to say, that the result of student
first kind of staff and faculty. So thank you. – [Chair Nystuen] Thank you Wyatt. (applause) Wyatt, would you tell your classmates thanks for the cool business card holders. – Yeah, I can do that. – [Chair Nystuen] They’re going
to all parts of the state, so thanks. Okay, great job. – Thanks. – [Chair Nystuen] That
was a good one, Jacque. – Our second student is Cheyenne Smith. She’s a second year student in the dental hygiene program, and will be graduating in May. She’s at Great Falls College. She was the co-chair of
the Great Falls College’s no smile left behind community dental day, which just took place
last week on March 2. So we’re lucky to have her here now that she has a
little bit of free time. Cheyenne. – All right, after that introduction, another great one. Good morning. Thank you for providing this opportunity to share my story, for your service, and for the Board of Regents, thank you. So I am, like she said, a current student at Great Falls College, and I am enrolled in the
dental hygiene program. Just some backstory, I recall wanting to be a dentist at a very young age. I got a dental barbie
when I was in first grade, and it blew up from there. And that’s what I’ve planned to do ever since I was little. So while in high school, my first real experience in dental, I worked for a pediatric dentist, and was able to shadow him. And then I went to Carol College after graduating Capital, and graduated with a degree in biology. And so after that, it took me a while to get a job, but I found myself working
for a dentist again. And I just decided that
this is what I needed to do, and my next step was dental hygiene. So the cleaning lady doesn’t
even begin to describe what dental hygienists do. (laughter) This is work that directly
helps another person. So beyond the teeth cleaning process, we educate our patients on oral home care, even our whole body as a whole. So this has life long impacts for them. And I think of it as being as part of their success in life. Through the college, I have cared for many patients that have not seen a
dentist in many years. Recently, oh, I’m gonna start crying. My patients are just so close to me. I recently had a patient, he
had never been to the dentist. It had been 24 years. His mom actually
encouraged him to come in. I was able to help him calm his anxiety. I was able to find him a
dental home here in Great Falls to keep receiving cleanings. With the dental hygiene program, it’s quite a commitment when
you come in as a student. Each appointment is three hours long because we are students. And depending on the status of your teeth, you may be there for four
or five appointments. This particular gentleman took me nine appointments. But he has touched my heart immensely. And he’s really just, he’s just one of the
biggest encouragements to pursue this, and why I chose this profession. For myself, this career choice will also provide a great income. The starting wages are around
$51,000 a year in Montana. And it’s also great flexibility. Hygienists have, they can pick their schedule. We’re not directly working with a dentist as they’re doing restorative care. We’re doing our side of
preventative cleaning care. So with my husband being a nurse, who works in a hospital 24 hours a day, seven days a week, he’s always running. I get to have this more flexibility for when we decide to have a family. So, having worked in a dental office, I know first hand the need
for dental hygienists. I have a bachelors degree, but that doesn’t mean that
you need a bachelors degree to practice dental hygiene. At Great Falls College, it’s two years to be a dental hygienist. And that’s after you take your boards, and get a license. We’re incredibly, hygienist are incredibly
important in our community. We get a great wage. And I just hope more people
decide to take this route, especially with this expansion coming up. You know right now, we can take 18 students. If we can increase that to 26, we’re just fulfilling
that need for hygienists here in the state. My time in Great Falls and at Great Falls College has greatly impacted my life. The patients that I
treated from the community as a student, and the Great Falls College dental clinic have played a special role in my life, as they’ve contributed to my education. And I definitely would
not be here without them. I’m in my fifth and final semester. And in 60 short days, not that I’m counting, (laughter) I’ll be looking for my prize board patient who I will clean in front of five examiners, graduating, and taking my final board exams to become a registered dental hygienist in the state of Montana. If you’re interested, I’m looking for volunteers. (laughter) I certainly can’t wait to begin work, and I’ve already accepted
a job here in Helena. And I want to thank you guys again for giving your time and attention today. Thank you. – Thank you Cheyenne. (applause) It should be noted that the next Montana
Board of Regents meeting is May 22 and 23 in Great Falls. So you’ve got a lot of willing patients right around the table here, right. Everybody, yeah. Thank you Cheyenne. What a great presentation. Both of them. So thank you to Dean Lacy and Dean Wolf for sharing two of your
student’s success stories with us today. With that– – Yeah, so Chair, I have, I have just a couple more slides for you. I’ll be quick. Obviously having students in front of us is more impactful and entertaining than just going over slides. But I do want to bring up Stephanie Gray. She is the workforce
program development manager at Gallatin College. She’s gonna highlight how the process works with creating a CTE program in order to meet workforce
needs in a community. – [Chair Nystuen] Welcome Stephanie. – Thank you. Sadly, I am not a student. (laughter) It is nice when we work in a world trying to solve problems to see the positive outcomes. So thank you students. I was asked to come and talk about some success stories in solving workforce problems in our community. And what I’d like to say is Gallatin College has started seven new workforce programs in the past six years. So we have been busy. And one trend that we
have recently started with photonics, laser optics, and culinary arts, and our new cyber security program, is we’re starting to work
with our four year partners at MSU. We’re starting down early
in the planning stage to talk to the four year faculty about number one, streamlining for our students to come in under the two year and moving into the engineering, or moving into photonics
and electrical engineering. And then the flip side, on the flip side of that is we have four years students, just like was just mentioned, who are wanting more technical skills to go along with their bachelor’s degree. And also, I think that’s what
industry is asking for also. So to get into specifics, I’m gonna talk about
the computer numerical machining program. It was a program that was on
our workforce needs assessment in 2011. So that’s a first lesson. Every college should have a
workforce needs assessment done based on their local economy and their local workforce needs. And we are working on one
using Perkins funds right now for 2018 and 19. It’s in draft form. And the nice thing about this process is we’re also partnering
with the city of Bozeman and the Bozeman chamber of commerce to get that completed. But we are using a little
bit of Perkins fund to get that done. And then that will guide the next phase of our work in our workforce programs. That’s just the data. Once you get the data, you have to sit down with
partners like Boeing. So you also have to sit down
with your local partners and see what they need. So we sat down with our industry partners and said well we see that there’s an uptick in manufacturing. What does that mean? What are the skills? What are the occupations? Let’s get specific. How many students are you gonna hire cause we don’t want to
train these students and then not to have a job. So once that’s approved, and we think we have good traction, then we’re gonna move into the details of how in the world do we pay for this. And as you can see from the slide, $350,000 just to start a C and C program is expensive. Our workforce programs are expensive. We want our students to be working on the best equipment, the most high tech equipment, relevant equipment possible. And so we have to leverage a lot of funds. It just so happens the Rev Up Grant was in process at that point. So we knew we had that funding coming, and we had just recently got the county mil levee passed. So we had good assurance that we were gonna be able
to pay for this program. And we moved forward. We, you all, approved the program in the spring of 2014, I believe. And then fall of 2014, we had our first 11 students. And those 11 students, of those 11, we had nine graduate. And all of them were
placed into employment. And since then, we’ve had 50 graduate, and 88% of them have been placed into employment. So you can see there’s an example of how to move this along and get, meet the workforce need. And if you have any questions, I’d be happy to answer those. – Questions? Questions for Stephanie? If not, very good. Thank you. – Mr. Chair, I do have
a Perkins Five update and a dual enrollment update. But depending on the schedule, I’m happy to wait until after lunch. – Madam Chair, Mr. Chair, Madam Chair, I suggest that if it’s at all possible, we maybe take 10 minutes or so after we return from the break to finish up some important information on dual enrollment and Perkins Five. Is that? – Absolutely. Sure. – Okay, thanks very much. So on a scheduling note, I think what we have heard here is I think something on kind
of the data number side, but really moving stories
from our two students. A great individual story about a new program being developed. And you can kind of continue that journey, if you have the opportunity to join us for a tour of the airport campus here at Helena College. So Amy, I believe we have
some shuttles outside. There is lunch provided
for meeting attendees. And I think the ARSA Committee will return at 2:30, is that right, for the full. Yeah, at 2:30, we’ll have a few minutes more of the two year committee, and then hopefully we can
move straight into ARSA. – That’s good, thank you. Madam Chair, I’ll throw it back to you. – Okay, we will go ahead and recess. And then until we return, Dean Lacy. – Oh yes, just for logistics the shuttle vans for the Regents and Commissioner staff will be right out front here. And for others, are invited and encouraged to carpool and head on over to the Airport Campus. And we’re very excited to
welcome you over there next. – Thank you. – All right. Is this, okay. All right everyone. Welcome back. I wanted to take just a
couple of minutes before we continue with our two year and community college committee meeting to ask Chair Albrecht to join me over in this side of the room an have everyone just
direct their attention to the corner over here. And I’ll kind of walk and
talk at the same time. And tell you that although there are others in the room that have known Regent Albrecht for much longer than I, it has become clear to me in just a few years that we’ve been honored to have Fran’s service as chair of
the Montana University System Board of Regents. And you know, it goes without saying that for the coming months
and years and decades, the system is going to feel your legacy in so many different positive ways. I think the Commissioner
would love to be here to share this with all of you, but I will tell you that the thing that’s obvious
to all of us, Fran, is it’s about students for you. And kind of the whole
lifecycle of students. You’ve done so much work to reach out to prospective student, first generation students, students who might not have otherwise thought about college in Montana. Certainly you do a lot
of work with students as Dean of the Honors college at the University of Montana. I felt that from you. And then you’re also
thinking all of the time about how students can contribute to economic growth, workforce development
in the state of Montana. You’re engagement and
leadership in Missoula with Western Montana
and the entire state is so impressive. And we’re gonna miss you on the board, but we know that you’re
gonna be a strong partner moving forward. So I will keep it fairly short. But you have to know that
there are a number of campuses that really want to say
thank you directly to you. And I think that since our host campus here is Helena College, that I will start by
asking Dean Kirk Lacy to come and say a few words and present
you with some thanks. So Kirk. – Regent Albrecht, we’re so appreciative of all your service. And as Brock said, we know that service has been all about students. And that’s why we’d like our students to be able to share somethings with you. I’ll hold it. – Dear Regent Fran Albrecht, on behalf of the associate of
students at Helena College, as the whole Helena College community, please accept this gift in recognition of your
many years of dedication, commitment, and service to
the Montana University System, and especially the MS students. The Helena Club art club, students and faculty advisor
created this work of art in your honor, and the illustration depicts and image of Helena College school building with emphasis on reflections in the campus windows as a way of symbolizing
our students reflections on their great learning experiences at Helena College. Thank you for all you have done to help Montana’s higher education system and continue to benefit students in Montana communities for years to come. (applause) – [Blake] President Cruzado, do you want to come? – Two minutes per person. So Regent Albrecht, look at that table. Can you find the bobcat or Montana State University
gift right there? – [Chair Albrecht] I can see. – Exactly, that blue and gold. Exactly. I just needed to say Fran, what an incredible honor it has been to have you as our Regent, and as chair of the Board of Regents. This is a hard job, and still, you managed every year to carry your responsibilities, and that heavy burden with such grace. And always placing students at the center of every deliberation. And for that, I wanted to say thank you. Since the moment I met you, I knew that you were
going to be a great regent because you come from a house divided, right, a graduate from MSU Billings. Your husband graduated from Montana Tech. Your husband is an avid bobcat. And you root for that team that shall remain nameless. But now you have a wonderful new addition at your home with that
(speaking foreign language) guy that all of you are rooting for. And we just need to say we
have been blessed to have you. Montana has been honored to have you, your service, your wisdom, you smile, and we just need to say and behalf of all the campuses of
Montana State University, thank you so much for
everything you have done for us. (applause) – [Brock] And President Bodnar. – This is a long procession, so. So I think one thing that you learn about this Board of Regents, this system is that it is, it is truly a team. You know, we have regents who are assigned by a community. And what’s been so great about Fran is she’s kind of my partner, my teammate. She’s not a UM alum. She went to Gonzaga at
MSU Billings, right. She’s from Great Falls. But what Fran, you have been is such a tremendous
advocate for higher education in this state. And it has been such an honor, even though it’s only been a year for me, I wish we had you longer, to have my Missoula community kind of partner on behalf of
Montana University System. I couldn’t have been more
blessed with a better partner. And I think we’ll talk about your, so much about your service to this system, to the
students of Montana. But I do want to emphasize
to everyone in this room, we talk about at the
University of Montana, about the importance of service to your community. And we talk about the serve at heart. And you see that embodied so clearly in Fran Albrecht, the
way you lived your life, running a children’s home, a children’s center. And your commitment to higher education, your commitment to service
in our medical community. You truly have lived your
life to serve others. And I was struck earlier this year as Fran was telling a little
bit of her life story. Fran is a child in a family with many. How many was it, seven? I couldn’t remember if
it was six or seven. Fran is the youngest of seven. As she told the story, by the time Fran came around, here parents really were kind of out of name options, so they said to her siblings, well what should we name this one. And her brothers happened to be quite big
Minnesota Viking’s fans, and were fans of a quarterback
named Fran Tarkenton. And as Fran tells it, that really maybe influenced the name of this incredible person that I’ve had a chance to. And I think it’s such an appropriate name because you have been such a leader, but
such a servant of others in a way that a quarterback does. He takes that ball and
hands it off to people and helps them be successful, whether that is young
children who you have provided a home and safe place for, or whether it is university students for whom you have fought and protected and made sure that they had a high quality, accessible education across this entire state. So thank you very much for
your partnership for me and for your service to our
community and our state. – Thank you. (applause) – And, and, we do have a really nice picture of your adopted alma mater. And you can point out where Jane is somewhere on our campus map, which is done by a world renowned artist, Chris Rogati, and a beautiful, beautiful print of the UM campus. So thank you very much. – There are a couple more campuses. I’m so sorry to tell you, but I did want to say thank you. (inaudible) – Thank you. I’ll be different and
start with the present. So this is, these were
made by one of our alums. Oh sorry. (inaudible) (audio cuts out) – Fran just said she
wants to change her mind. She wants to stay. – No, I’m booked for Italy in May. But I just want you to know that was, thank you. You are all very special
to me in so many ways. And I appreciate the opportunity that I’ve been able to grow so much despite my own self questioning in going down this road and thinking how can is serve effectively. And thank you for affirming that this was a good path for me in serving you and this state. Just know that I will
be cheering you all on in my small way behind the scenes encouragingly. I will be, I am your
biggest fan out there. So thank you. And that’s enough of that. Thank you. – I will mention that
truly our other campuses that have somethings to offer. I just spoke with President Michelson, but in the sake of time, we will move on and just know that you’re very much appreciated, Fran. – And back to you. (laughter) – Thank you Chair Albrecht. We just got a couple other
quick things to go through to conclude the two year education community college committee. But first, before we do, I
think we need to do a big thank you to Dean Lacy, Tammy, and the crew out at the airport campus. That was truly enlightening. That was my second time
out there for a visit. And I know some of them, this was the very first time. The handout and the flyer was great. You are having a marvelous impact on this region, this Helena economy, the students and so forth. And so it’s something that we
just need to continue to do is to do these looksies at the types of things you’re doing. And so if you would, please convey to your staff on behalf of all the regents, and the two year committee, how much we appreciate the show and tell. It was awesome, so thank you. With that, I think we’ve got two other things to quickly discuss. Probably the first one will take the most, we’ll probably dedicate the most time to, and in consideration for very briefly the November followup, dual enrollment. Can we throw it back to you, Director Treaster. – Sure, Mr. Chair, members of the committee. If it’s okay with you, I quickly wanted to just
give a very brief update on where we are in the
Perkins Five planning. So I brought to your attention an item earlier that you all will be voting on. That’s the transition plan. Now that that has wrapped up. We are working on the four year plan for Perkins five. We do have an advisory committee that includes members of education and from industry. It’s in Montana statue that the commissioner
chooses three people, and the superintendent
also chooses three people, with four people representing education and two from business and
industry all on our committee. We had our first meeting that was a little effected by some weather a couple of weeks ago. So we had a pretty light kickoff and we’re gonna be getting into hopefully some meetings where more members
will be in attendance next week. We also have public hearings that have been scheduled for March 25, and April 17. Details will soon to be followed, be following soon. We’re working on having different places all throughout the state so that the public can come, and can have an opportunity to give their feedback on CTE and the information that’s
gonna be in the state plan. And then we’ll also be
publishing some advertisements about that so that we can have as much public participation as possible. We also have a CTE survey that is circulating around the state that is being used for
stakeholder engagement. The list of stakeholders is quite extensive. And it includes teachers, parents, students, members of business and industry, people who represent agencies that serve the special populations list that we spoke about earlier. And all of you are included as stakeholders in career
and technical education because you’re also
members of our community. And so if it happens to
come across your desk, I urge you to please complete it and forward it on. And then we’ll also have
a public comment period for written comments. That’s a 30 day period that will happen late fall. And that’s after the actual
plan has been written. So everyone will have a chance to read it, and submit comment. In March 2020, so a year from now, this board will approve
the final state plan, and it’ll be sent to Governor Bullock for signature. And then in April 2020, we’ll be submitting the plan to the US Department of Education. So we’re well on our way. Just a quick mention
about the partnerships that we have while we’re writing the state plan. So unfortunately, superintendent
Arntzen isn’t here, but we have had a really strong relationship with the Office of Public Instruction. They’re really our core
partners with Perkins. They handle all of the
funding on the secondary side. And so, you know, just kind
of a special shout out to OPI. We’ve been a little bit short staffed as far as CTE and dual enrollment go at OCHE. And they have really stepped up and helped with a ton of planning. All the CTE work that has been done over the past couple of months, they’ve really had a huge hand in helping. And so I just want to have, do a special shout out to OPI because they’ve stepped up and have been amazing partners. We’ve been working a lot with the Department of Labor and Industry. They are currently working
on their state work force innovation board. Sorry, we’ve been working with the state work force innovation board, or SWIB, because they’ve been
working on their workforce innovation and opportunity act, or WIOA. They’re currently in the
planning process for that, that funding stream. And so we’re trying to
line as much as possible, both plans, so that we can have some dual efforts in the states, in the state that are lined up, especially in areas like
work based learning. We’re trying to make sure that we’re not siloed, that
we’re all working together, and that these funding streams can really start to work together and make a big difference in the state. We also work with the governor’s office quite extensively. Seri is actually a part of
our state executive leadership team with Perkins. And she has been involved with
the entire planning process, and will continue to be involved for our Governor’s office
consultation that’s required. And of course, as Brock mentioned earlier, we try to involve business and industry as much as possible. Workforce need is a huge
part of Perkins five. It has to be considered with
every single expenditure. And so we need to make sure that we always have business industry at the table. Next slide. Okay, so that’s all I have
for Perkins five update. So are there any questions, I’d be happy to take them now. Okay, if it’s okay with you, Chair, I will just go right into
dual enrollment update, because we’re running a little bit behind. So this is a chart that you all have seen before. This is the most updated
numbers that I have. So unfortunately I don’t have the numbers yet for fall of 2018. But hopefully we’ll be having that soon. So this chart essentially shows the growth in the state for concurrent enrollment. Sorry, not just concurrent enrollment, but any student who’s taking a college course while
they’re in high school. And so you can see the growth here in the latest numbers that we had. The governor did mention
while he was here, it’s a little over 3,000 students who are participating. Next slide. And then this chart you’ve seen from Amy Williams. And Regent Lozar, you brought this up earlier as well. So we can see that 100% of the double A schools in Montana do participate in concurrent enrollment. A schools are nearly there. They’re at 90%. And again, this is 17, 18, so we’ll be waiting on
updated 18, 19 numbers as soon as they’re available. B schools are a little bit higher than that 50% mark. So I think that they’re
looking pretty good. They’re at 62%. I apologize, this is a little bit blurry. And so they’re getting closer as well. And then C schools, while they are at 32%, it’s quite a large jump from 19% in just one aid year. And so, or school year. And so I think that the
progress being made each year is significant. And that’s what we’re striving to do is keep making sure that
that growth is there in our small and rural schools. Next slide. And just a little shout out, and Dean Lacy mentioned this. Helena College saw quite a bit of success from Fall 17 to Fall 18. They increased their
headcount by 153 students. That was the largest jump that we saw from Fall 17 to Fall 18. And CTE dual enrollment, in particular, we like to make sure
that we’re keeping track of the CTE courses that are being taught, has increased from 7% from 2015. So from 25% of the
total courses being CTE, now at 32%. And that hopefully will
be a little bit larger as we kind of wrap up this year and get to see the numbers. Areas making the strongest gains are information technology, manufacturing, health science, and finance. And these are important areas to mention just because they’re quite a
few technical skill attainments that students can graduate with, once they’re graduating from high school, after participating in dual enrollment. They can graduate with
some credentials as well. So that was a really sort update. Hopefully we’ll have
some more numbers for you once we wrap up the year. But I’m happy to stand for any questions. – [Chair Nystuen] Questions? – Yeah, actually I just have
a concern that we’ve noticed from (inaudible). And with high schools of course having more limited budgets, they’ll have the same
textbook year after year. When it’s the universities, we get new additions. Now most of the time, those new additions
are basically switching from one chapter to another, and doesn’t make too much
substantial difference. But it might over time. So it’s just something that I noted, that we’ve noted here as faculty that might be something
to have on our radar to make sure that they
have enough resources, high schools have enough resources, especially some of the smaller schools. (inaudible) they’re using a psychology edition that was two before, two editions before. So I don’t think it’s a big issue now, but something just to be aware of that I think to keep up on the editions. – Thank you. – Thank you very much. One of the areas, it’s a bold move to go to One, Two, Free across the entire state here, and I’m wondering if the regents should ask the Commissioner’s Office to maybe start giving us some financial information as it relates to the, what’s it cost. We see the numbers. The enrollment’s gonna go up. We just know that that’s
on the right trajectory. But comes with that though is the expectation that were are the dollars
coming from to do this. Is it sustainable? Do we have the budget dollars? Do we have the resources to continue this upward slope. So perhaps Deputy Commissioner Tessman, we could cue this up
for further discussion at some other meetings with you and Deputy Commissioner Trevor as well. So you’re thoughts? – Mr. Chair, regents, I think that’s a great idea. And we are still finalizing the data from fall 2018. I want to say that I think it’s, it’ll be at least one more semester, and probably actually through fall of 2019 before we realize the full impact of One, Two, Free. To their credit, the Commissioner and the Governor rolled out One, Two, Free fairly quickly at the end of the summer. And what it meant is I
don’t think we saw campuses having quite as much
time as they would like to adjust and actually fully
market and implement that. So I think we’re gonna get
some numbers quite soon on fall 2018. I think it’ll take a year
before we really know longterm what we would expect
the expenditures to be. And we’re committed to that program. There may be some small
alterations over time. We’re committed to that program in terms of a long term
sustainable source of funding. It’s on our agenda. I think we want to work closely
with our community college partners as well to make sure
that we’re moving forward in lock step on securing funding for that. Yeah, we’re committed to it. – Thank you. Questions or comments. Regent Rogers. – I just want to commend you for all the focus that you have on interfacing with business and industry. I feel like that is such a key component of getting this right, and making sure that
we’re being responsive. And just look forward to learning more about what that process will look like, and how we can help more
leaders to be engaged in the process too. – Any other comments? Deputy Commissioner Tessman, anything else? Do we have time today to delve into the November discussion, or you want to capsulize that? What’s your preference? – I don’t think we’ll turn
it into a full agenda item, Mr. Chair. I think many of you will remember that in November, we had, I think, quite a lively discussion in Missoula about two year education in the Montana university system. And I think it was a great starting point. It was just a starting point. And I would envision maybe in May, maybe in September, a full update from out two year CEOs. Quite frankly, I’d love to see some of those two year leaders at this main table, at least for that part of the discussion so we can have their
voices front and center. And we are having ongoing discussions. We’ll meet tomorrow at a kind of semi-retreat format. And believe this board can expect the kind of new strategic
plan for two year education in the state of Montana within the next six to eight months. – Very good. Questions or comments? From the campuses, anyone? With that, Deputy Commissioner Tessman, thank you for your work. Jacque, great job. We appreciate the insights and all the team that pulls
the information together that gives us this kind of report. So thank you. With that, Madam Chair, we’ll turn the committee back over to you. – Thank you, Regent Nystuen. At this point, we will move it to chair of the academic research and student affairs committee, Regent Sheehy, who chairs the committee. Chair Sheehy. – Thank you Chair. We have a full docket today, gang. So we’re gonna start right in. Let’s start in with our action items. Item A is an honorary doctorate originating from the
University of Montana. I’d like to call on President Bodnar. – Thank you. Madam Chair, Regents, it is my honor on behalf of the University
of Montana faculty to propose to this board for consideration for an honorary doctorate, Denise Juno. Denise is an exceptional graduate of the University of Montana School of Law who went on to have a career of tremendous service and impact across all of Montana, and far beyond. As members of this board will know, she served as the superintendent
of public instruction from 2009 to 2017, where she stewarded initiatives to help our K through 12 Montanans improve their educational outcomes through evidence based instruction. And an incredible number of initiatives that she personally drove. You’ll also know as she
served as the Director of Indian Education playing an instrumental role in Montana’s Indian
education for all program. And her leadership, both in the field of education, as well as in helping
all Montanans develop more effective relations with our tribal communities has been a wonderful example for all Montanans, and for the University of Montana. We’re honored to present her for an honorary doctorate. – Thank you President Bodnar. Regents, any questions or comments? Anyone else from the campuses? Hearing none, we’ll vote on that tomorrow. Moving on to action item B. This is an honorary doctorate originating from the
University of Montana. And once again, I call
on President Bodnar. – Madam Chair, regents, it is again another honor to present to you on behalf of the university, Dr. Bill Reynolds for an honorary doctorate from
the University of Montana. Dr. Reynolds is known and loved by many in this room and across this state. A native of Haver, Montana. He’s born in 1930, and graduated from the
University of Montana having served as our
student body president. After graduation, he received his commission in the United States Air Force and served as a second lieutenant before coming back and
getting a distinguished career of medicine. 40 years as a doctor of internal medicine, and endocrinology at the
Western Montana clinic. Dr. Reynolds is not just a beloved doctor who faithfully served his patients. He is a kind mentor who developed and encouraged many throughout his career, and impacted the medical community across the state in tremendous ways. And he also is the epitome of a community leader. And has been a pillar of
the Missoula community, and continues to be a strong supporter, advisor, and mentor for many at
the university today. And we are honored to present him for consideration for the honorary doctorate. – Regents, any questions or comments? Campuses? All right, we’ll move on. Thank you for bringing those individuals to our attention, and
for celebrating them, President Bodnar. Action item C is an honorary doctorate originating from Montana State University. I’d like to call on President Cruzado. – Regent Sheehy, members of the board, it is a distinct pleasure and an honor for me to elevate to your consideration on behalf of the faculty and the senate of Montana State University the nomination of Commissioner
emeritus Sheila Sterns as a recipient of an honorary doctorate of Montana State University. In so many ways, many of the initiatives
that we’ve discussed today come from Sheila Sterns. The conversations that we still talk about the importance of access, that higher education
is for all Montanans. The conversation about affordability. Many of the initiatives having to deal with tuition caps in
front of the legislature started with Sheila. The focus on two year education, but also on the doctoral education, and graduate and undergraduate education, all of that came from her time. The concept of the university campus as that engine of economic development on one hand, but also of community builder. Sheila Sterns is an incredible individual who has served Montana so well. When we take a look at the
Board of Regents policy 3221 that allows honorary
degrees to be awarded to candidates who must have an association with the state of Montana, achieved a level of distinction which would merit comparable recognition in their profession, and have renown, which reflects favorably on the Montana university system and the state of Montana. That’s Sheila Sterns. Last but not least, this is a lady that conducts herself superbly well in the presence of dignitaries, elected officials, or a full room, or a room
full of preschoolers. Last but not least, and on a personal note, when I saw that nomination cross my desk, it really touched my heart. Sheila Sterns was the commissioner who did me the favor of
bringing me to Montana. And I have a personal note of appreciation and gratitude because of that. So it is, again, based
on the recommendation of the faculty of Montana State University that I am honored to elevate this nomination
for your consideration. Thank you. – Thank you, President Cruzado. Regents, any comments or questions? You’re all familiar with the individual. Campuses, any comments or questions? All right, thank you, President Cruzado. Moving to action item D. This is a request for authorization to revise mission and vision statements, which will be included in the 2019 strategic plan for Montana State University Billings. I’d like to call on Dr. Edelman to present this item. – Thank you Madam Chair. I appreciate the opportunity to present. – [Regent Sheehy] I don’t think it’s on. – Rewind. There’s even a little
label that says that. (laughter) Should have wore glasses. Anyway, thank you Madam Chair. I appreciate the opportunity to present Montana State
University Billings new mission, vision and strategic plan (inaudible) to the Board of Regents. This is an exciting step forward for MSUB as we continue
to put students first. Last fall, we convened a
group of over 50 students, faculty, staff, and community members to commence brainstorming on the university’s new strategic plan. Two of those students are at my side with me. Savannah Merit and Taylor Krukrosky. Our prior seven year plan was coming to a close. And northwest commission on
colleges and universities accreditation visit was forthcoming. MSUB hosted a number of strategic plan brainstorming sessions, followed by an outside consultant who I had worked with at
a previous institution that was able to facilitate
and get the job done quickly and right. From these sessions, we
developed a starting framework for the strategic plan, as well as a new vision and mission. We also synthesized aspects of MSU and MUS strategic plans, my first year goals, and the great work of the MSU Billings community taskforce into what you see today. Our mission, vision, and
strategic plan framework were sent out to campus for feedback, and the community. Additionally, we hosted an open forum inviting all of
constituents for discussion. This is a big process
and a huge undertaking by everyone on the campus. And on the screen, I
won’t read everything, but we did come up with great advice from out students for a simple vision. Which is educating students to impact an evolving global community. And a concise mission
statement as as well, Montana State University Billings delivers a transformative education that empowers students
from diverse backgrounds to succeed. Every student matters at our institution, and we put them first, regardless of where they’re at. The new strategic plan
framework has three themes, and five objectives, which I won’t read to you
in the essence of time. Our administration’s been leading
up to the plan and themes. Co-chairs have been appointed, and assembled committees for
each of these objectives. They’ve identified initial sub-objectives and will be working towards action plans. With this new strategic plan, we are working closely
with our accreditors to ensure that we develop
meaningful indicators of success. In fact, during the recent visit, I promised I would submit
our mission and vision to you for consideration in March. And thank you very much
to the commissioner and President Cruzado for allowing me to make that happen, and keep
my word with the accreditors. Thank you very much
for your consideration. I welcome any questions. – Regents, any questions? I have one, oh, go ahead Bob. I have one for the students. What was the level of student involvement and acceptance of the
strategic plan process and final document? – Oh, we were more involved than I think we have been. And it was really
encouraging cause there was seven or eight different students from different parts of campus. All four of our ASAM SUB
executives were there, along with other leaders. And we were all split
up at different tables, so the students weren’t working together. We were working with the
staff and faculty and admin to come up with each answer
that we all provided. And so it wasn’t just them or just us. It was all of us together. – [Regent Sheehy] Thank you. Regent Nystuen. – Thank you Chair Sheehy. One of the things I guess I like is the brevity. It’s just plain and clear. It’s simple and straight forward. It’s uncomplicated with
a lot of fancy jargon and things like that, for which I thank you. – [Dr. Edelman] Thank you. – Regents, any other questions? Campuses? Dr. Edelman, thank you. – Thank you. And I’d like to thank the
community for helping us, and the students as well. So thank you ladies. – Thanks Savannah and Taylor. Moving on to action item E, mission and core themes for
Montana State University. President Cruzado. (inaudible) – Regent Sheehy, members of the board, I would like to ask Provost Mowka) to present to introduce this proposal. – [Regent Sheehy] Thank you. And Bob, you’re gonna be
here for a little bit. So get comfortable. – [Chair Nystuen] Okay. – Thank you Chair Sheehy and regents for this
opportunity to present for authorization Montana
State University’s new mission statement and core themes. So over the past 126 years, the wording of our mission statement has varied slightly. Nevertheless, since our founding in 1893, our north star has always
been our tripartite mission statement. Has always been our
tripartite land grant mission of learning, discovery, and engagement. Today I present to you our new mission statement that was revised as part
of a 15 month long process that was coupled with a development of Montana State University’s new 2019 strategic plan titled choosing promise. So choosing promise was developed in a consultative manner, facilitated by university
strategic planning committee who met regularly with internal and external stakeholders using an iterative process beginning in October 2017 and concluding at the end of 2018. Because our mission and core themes are replicated precisely
in our strategic plan, the processes were congruent for building, reviewing, and providing input for all these components, which work together and are linked naturally. And extensive engagement process was used with a variety of input, opportunity and communication channels. The strategic planning committee, lead by Chris Fastnell, MSU’s director of planning and analysis, met with hundreds of internal and external stakeholders to gather information and feedback. This included multiple open forums, shrets, meetings with standing committees, as well as engaging with
all of our councils, faculty senate, student senate, and other governing bodies. Montana State University’s
new strategic plan, which included our mission statement, vision, and core themes were approved unanimously
by university council, the governance body at
Montana State University on November 7, 2018. The university began
using choosing promise in January, 2019. So with that overture, I’m here today to request
your authorization to approve Montana State University’s new mission statement, which reads as follows. As a state’s land grant university, Montana State integrates education, creation of knowledge and art
and service to communities. In addition to the mission statement, three core themes were identified as part of the
strategic planning process. And these manifest essential elements of our mission, and collectively encompass the aspects of our tripartite mission. And they are the core theme one, drive transformation learning experiences, creating out standing educational outcomes for all our students. Core theme two, improve lives in society through research,
creativity, and scholarship. Core theme three, expand usually beneficial and responsive engagement for the advancement of Montana. For each core theme, we identified objectives, specific strategies, and assessable indicators
of progress and achievement. These objectives and indicators will provide necessary quantitative and qualitative information for reporting, and for data driven decision making. So in closing, the bedrock of the university’s mission is rooted in our land grant heritage. More than 156 years ago, the Morrill Act passed
during the Civil War, provided access and opportunity for a college education to all Americans. This opportunity provided social mobility as a vehicle for
intellectual opportunities that would improve life in the community and the region. Montana State University has done so for more than 125 years. And the mission statement and core themes I present to you today represent our commitment to you and the people of Montana that our legacy is a land grant university is profoundly important and continues to grow stronger every day. Our mission, vision and core themes define what we do, why we do it, and how we do it. As Provost and chief academic officer at Montana State University, I thank you for this opportunity to consider our request for authorization of our new mission statement and core themes. Thank you. – Thank you, Provost Mokwa. Regents, any questions? Comments? Campuses? Moving to action item F, please stay put. Provost Mokwa, this is the
request for authorization to name the ranch management program Montana State University. It’s my understanding that
you’ll be speaking to this. – I will be, Madam Chair. May I ask you permission
to grab some notes. – Absolutely. While you’re gone, for those of you playing at home, we are going to be
looking at action item F, and then portions of action item G, which are sort of related. So flip back and forth. Find your notes while we wait for Provost Mokwa. There he is. – Thank you Madam Chair, and regents. Montana State University requests authorization from the Board of Regents to name the ranch management program at Montana State University the Dan Scott Ranch Management Program in honor of Dan Scott and the Scott family. The Dan Scott Ranch Management Program is named for the late Dan Scott. Eldest son of Padlock Ranch founder, Homer Scott. Dan Scott served as the
chief executive officer and manager of the ranch for 50 years. Founded in 1943 by
Homer and Mildred Scott, the Padlock Ranch is a diversified cow calf farm and feed lot operation in Montana and Wyoming. Dan Scott’s daughter, Risa, provided MSU with a $2
million gift in 2018 in her father’s honor
to support the program. To date, MSU has raised $3.5 million for the program with a goal of continuing to raise more funds. With your permission, I would like to invite the department head of our
animal and range science program, Pat Hatfield to the podium, and he can provide some more information about the ranch management program, and how we envision it being implemented at Montana State. – Thank you. Dr. Hatfield. – Thank you regents, Mokwa, regents, and Chairwoman, I appreciate this opportunity. The first think I’d like to say about naming the program, I’m a graduate of
Montana State University, the department of animal
and range sciences. And this is honestly
one of the high points of my career to be able to stand before you and talk about this program. This is an incredible naming opportunity and gift from Risa Scott to MSU. The legacy of Dan Scott and the Padlock Ranch with their commitment to the land, people, and the ranching tradition represents the skills, values, and commitments that our
graduates will display when they go out to serve
Montana agriculture. This was a grassroots movement. This did not originate from
Montana State University. When Dean Charles Boyer, vice president of agriculture, arrived in December of 2014, within six weeks, people from the ranching community approached Dr. Boyer about developing a program
in ranch management. So with the support of Provost Mokwa, President Cruzado, and the endless hours that Chris Murray and Kevin Peterson put
in from the foundation, we were lucky enough to get the funding, but also to work with
the ranching community, the natural resource community, to develop what this program
is going to look like. So we’re really proud
of what we have here. I think we are really going to make major contribution to Montana agriculture. Thank you. – Thank you Dr. Hatfield. And you too may remain there cause I’m gonna call on you in a minute. Regents, any questions or comments about the naming? – Chair Sheehy. Since you and I work so
closely on the naming policy, you assured that all of the policy of protocol has been followed. – It has been followed, even though there is some doubt as whether it applies to the naming of a program. But they did seek public comment and followed the rubric. Thank you for asking. – Thank you. – [Regent Sheehy] Regent Tuss. – [Regent Tuss] That was my question. (laughter) – Any other comments? I’d just like to say that the Scott family have been friends to the university system. They’ve been friends to
individual institutions. And they’ve been great friends of mine. And so it’s an honor to be part of this honoring of them. I’m very excited about this, as are you Dr. Hatfield. Hearing no questions
from campuses or regents, moving to action item G. These are the level two items. And if you two would
stay right where you are, we’re gonna move around a little bit here. There are some items that are related to the naming of this program. So I’m going to ask Provost Mokwa to move to the second item on our level two action items agenda. We’re gonna start with
the bachelor of science in ranching systems, and then move to the retitled, the division of agricultural education to division and department. But before we begin the level twos, I want to assure the board that these have all been discussed by the ARSA committee. OCHE has requested approval, or
recommended approval of each of the items on
the level two action items. And the ARSA has no objections to any of the items. So I won’t say that with
respect to each item. Just know that going in. And with that, let’s talk
about the bachelor of science in ranching systems. – Thank you Chair Sheehy. The last item addressed a
ranch management program. That’s an umbrella program that within that umbrella includes opportunities and funding for workshops, for seminars, and further aspects to provide educational opportunities for ranch management to many programs across the university. A component of that is this academic item, which is a ranch management systems bachelors of science program. This program is structured to prepare our graduates with the
diverse skillset needed to meet the challenges of today’s complex livestock and
natural resources industry. It’s structured, and the reason
it has system in it’s name is it’s truly a systems level approach that includes coursework, and experiential hands on learning, animal production, natural resource management, economics and business. It also includes aspects
of applied skills, such as communication, critical thinking, and a student centered curriculum that integrates the tripartite aspects of the missions that we just discussed. So Madam Chair, if I may
invite Pat to the stage, or to the podium, to provide some more information. – Yes, Dr. Hatfield. – Thank you. Again, this is a systems level approach. What you typically see
in academia is focus. So we have a very good
program in animal science with the majority of the
course work in animal science. We have a good program in range management. Again, focus with more than 60 credits in range management, range ecology, ecology. We have an outstanding
program in ag business, again, with that focus
in economics, business, and accounting. This program is spread
really quite equally between those three general disciplines. So what we hope to do is
provide that broad base to stimulate, first of all, a passion for lifetime learning, the skills for critical thinking, and really enhance that passion for this industry. It’s not an infatuation. It is a passion. And passion has to be worked at. And we want to establish that foundation. One thing, when I’ve gone
out and talked to people about this, this is a four year program. We will be graduating students that are 21, 22, 23 years old. There is no substitution for experience. That will start with
our internship program.. And one of the really integral parts about
the internship program that we gained in discussions with ranch managers, both in Montana, talking to Trey Patterson, who’s the current CEO
of the Padlock Ranch, is we want those student
experiences on the ranch to start after the sophomore year and continue through
the time they graduate. That relationship will continue. They certainly are coming back to campus for their course work, but that student, who for example, might be working with one of the Sitz brothers on a seed stock operation, they’re going to have a responsibility to come back and enhance their communication skills. They need to teach the other
students in the program about that seed stock operation. The student that goes and
works with the Padlock Ranch, or a stocker operation, again, they have to come back and educate the other students. So not only do they get that experience, I think it really
enhances that leadership, that communication, both written and oral, that we find so important in any aspect of agriculture or business anywhere today. Thank you. – Thank you. Regents, any questions about
the bachelor of science in ranching systems? Regent Lozar. – Thank you Chair Sheehy. Just looking over the executive summary, there’s Miles Community College currently has an AA and MSU Northern University of Montana Western has expressed interest in potentially new programming. So I’m wondering if you
just maybe just briefly talk about sort of ways in which you intend to sort of integrate with some of those assets and those interests in
those three schools. – That’s a really good point. I think one really important thing here is on a broader scale, when we get this up and running, we will be the premier institution. There is room for others. The University of Wyoming, South Dakota, there is room at the two year level, nine month training. There’s an incredible demand out there. So in our conference call last week, Northern commented, and I think it was a great opportunity to talk about their mechanized ag. So it’s a little bit different than what we’re really proposing here. But I do think it allows the Montana university system to give our students a suite of options. Miles City Community College, we’re actually in conversation
with them right now on a broader scope of how do we transition students who might be interested in animal science, range management, or ag business. How do we bring them from
Miles City Community College to MSU as seamless as possible. And one of the discussion there is also how do we bring
students from Miles City Community College and help them be successful as potential students in the
ranch management program. – [Regent Sheehy] Any
other questions regents? Campuses? MCC, Western and Northern? You’re okay with this? Thank you very much. Bob, you’re still here. – [Provost Mokwa] Thank you. – Thank you Dr. Hatfield. Next on our agenda, we’re going up one now to the master of science
in dietetic leadership or systems leadership. Provost Mokwa. – Thank you Chair Sheehy. With this request, we’re
asking authorization to offer a masters of science in dietetic systems leadership. Montana State University currently provides a internship program for students who wish to
achieve the credentialed registered dietitian,
nutritionist license. The accrediting board has indicated recently that they will be
changing the requirements for accreditation as a licensed dietitian, and require a masters degree along with the dietetic
internship program. So with this request, we’re asking to provide the coursework that’s necessary to complete
that masters degree. The coursework will be
fully offered online. And it will be combined
with the dietetic internship so that when students graduate with that combination, they’re able to apply for the licensure. There are no other programs
in the state of Montana. The demand is quite high for that program. We generally are only able to accept about 50% of
the students that apply. We’re primarily limited by the number of clinical
sites that are available for this internship component. – Any questions? Comments? Thank you Provost. – [Provost Mokwa] Thank you. – [Regent Sheehy] You’re still here. Retitle the division of
agricultural education from division to department. Provost Mokwa, can you explain that to us? – Thank you. So we currently have a division within the college of agriculture called the division of
agriculture education. That’s non-characteristic
at Montana State University. It does not fit within
our academic structure of departments and colleges. So this request is purely a retitling. We’re requesting to retitle the program, the unit from a division
of agricultural education to a department of agricultural education. Currently the leader of that unit has a title of director. And his title would change to a department head. – Thank you provost. Any questions? Regent Tuss. – Thank you. And apologies for asking the same question that I asked during the ARSA committee conference call. But as a citizen board, could you talk to us a little bit about what the difference is in a division versus a department, and why this is important? – And that’s a good question, Regent Tuss. And as we sort of stumbled
about it on the call giving our suggestions on the titling and naming
that occurs in higher ed, and it varies from
university to university. And Montana State University, we primarily have in academic units, departments and colleges. However there are exceptions. We have a school within the college of arts and architecture, for example. And in that case, the
leaders of that units of each of those schools has a title of director. We’re, with this request, we’re trying to simplify our structure to some degree, we have divisions within the university that are not associated in academic units. And we have directors. And what we’re trying to do is get more unification in the nomenclature to hopefully make it a little bit simpler for our students. We’re already confused. And we would like to streamline the– – You’re on the record, Provost. – [Provost Mokwa] I know, I’m sorry. I knew you were gonna ask that question. – If I may, if I may add, as important as standardizing our operations is, I also think that there’s
an element of equity involved in this. So you have a college of agriculture where all the academic programs are housed in a department with the exception of agricultural education, which is a division. So, one of the things
is not like the others. In spite of the fact that they have the same credentials, they come from bachelorette degrees. So it’s a matter of equity and fairness to agricultural education, which by the way is such an important and
crucial program and offering for the future of Montana. – [Provost Mokwa] Absolutely. – [Regent Sheehy] Regent Lozar. – I don’t want to beat a dead horse here, but I will. So, in any way does this
have any impact on budgets, or any sort of flow of resources? So that’s my first question. And the second, does this have anything to do with adjustments in priorities of agricultural education on campus? – Regent Lozar, good question. As an answer to your first question, no directly this has no impact on budgets. However, as the president indicated, by providing more standardization, we see great growth potential in these areas of agricultural education. We have two other departments
within the university that also teach courses that fall into that career
technical education rubric. So by having better alignment
with these departments, we hope that we’re building
a foundation for growth in the future. That would include additional
resources from students, and we hope in the future to be able to expand our academic offerings in these areas. But currently, as part of this request, there’s no budget impact. – Any other questions? Seeing none. Provost Mokwa, you’re done. – Thank you. I very much appreciate that. – Just a scheduling note, we were scheduled for a break, but we’ve only been going for an hour. So I’m going suggest that we keep going and that we hit the 3:45 public comment at 3:45 as stated on our agenda. And then we’ll decide if we need a break. (inaudible) Okay. All right. So next up is Montana
State University Northern. The plumber pipe fitter AAS degree. – Thank you, madam chair, members of the board. I was hoping Bob would
take this one also, but. (laughter) Wrong university, right system. We have two items here. The first one is our
plumber pipe fitter AAS. This was actually approved temporarily through the board in May of last year. And this came at the request of industry for particular needs. We have a couple programs. Our plumbing and our welding program. And this is a really good way to bridge those two programs to meet those industry needs. And so we’re coming back here for the permanent approval of this. I believe we had 18, have 18 students in
that program currently. And the idea is, as with all of them, is to keep that growing. And I think, you know, there’s a fair number of
large construction projects going on in the state where there’s strong need for students in this area. – Thank you Dr. Mozie. Any questions regarding the
plumber pipe fitter AAS? Campuses? Thank you. Next, from Montana State
University Northern, is retitling the college of education arts, sciences and nursing, which used to be C-E-A-S-M, CEASM, to the college of arts,
sciences and education, an easier acronym, CASE. Dr. Mozie. – Correct, thank you Chair
and members of the board. This name change that’s coming up due to nursing and our health promotion moving into a new college of health sciences. That was approved by the board a couple of years ago. Since then, we have hired a dean, moved the programs into that, and needed to rename the college of education, arts, sciences and nursing. The faculty met, looked at different acronyms. And how do you move those
different terms around and came up with a the college of arts, sciences and education. So we bring this forward
today for approval for the renaming of that college. – Any questions? Campuses? Thank you Neal. – [Dr. Mozie] Thank you. – Next on the agenda, University of Montana Missoula. We’ve grouped these. The first group is majors, minors, options and certificates. And we’re going to start with accounting fundamentals CEAS. Provost, welcome. (audio cuts out) – Think creatively about what to stop doing, as well as new opportunities and organizational change. It was a hard and careful look at what we are doing, and how we wanted to move forward to best serve students and the state of Montana. We are seeing the results
of this considerable effort in several of the proposals
coming forward today. This includes consolidation
and reorganization to better meet our students’ needs, to increase effectiveness and efficiency, and to better position
our programs for success. It is also included leveraging
our existing courses to create more opportunities
for our students to earn valuable credentials. So for example, you’ll
see a number of programs in which our faculty are proposing to use existing courses to provide new certificates that will enhance the qualifications and competitiveness of our students. It is exciting to see this innovation and enhanced support for student success. Dean McClain will present the
Missoula College proposals, and I’ll present the
Mountain Campus proposals. You’re up first. – Thank you. The certificate of applied sciences in accounting technology came about as a result of
one of our faculty members, Lisa Swallow, working with a local
Missoula advisory committee of Missoula county employers. And this is really a
response to our workforce development need, having a real need for individuals with basic accounting
and bookkeeping skills. With the low unemployment rate that we’re experiencing, particularly in the Missoula area, this has really created a
limited pool of candidates. And so two things about this is one, no new courses are being created. It’s a packaging of the first year AAS into a certificate program, which will then also create a stackable credential because all of those that complete the CAS, if they want to go on for the AAS, all of those courses will
roll towards the degree. – Thank you Dean McClain. Any other questions? Thank you. Next up is the ethics minor. We are tag teaming. Provost. – So the philosophy department plans to create an
interdisciplinary ethics minor consisting of six courses from a list of courses currently taught at the University of Montana. It’s tailored to students majoring in other disciplines. And the ethics minor
is designed to enhance the capacities of critical thinking, social engagement, and reflection on major moral issues. Through this minor,
students will acquire tools for critical reflection that will help them address the major moral challenges of the 21st century. And strengthen their ability to pursue careers in
fields such as business, science, journalism, advocacy, non-profit work, law, and healthcare. As I mentioned in my opening, this is part of an effort at UM by departments to create
additional credentials of value to students that leverage our existing courses, and thus can be done with
little or no additional cost. It also provides a new opportunity in one of UM’s core
strengths in the humanities. – Any questions for Provost Harbor? Regarding the ethics minor? All right, we’ll move on to bachelor of arts in linguistics. – So the linguistics program at UM is the only program
currently offering degrees in linguistics in the MUS. Currently we offer an MA and an undergraduate minor. And so there was a gap. Students who wished to pursue linguistics at the bachelors degree level have so far been advised
to major in anthropology, or English and study
linguistics as an option. But they are dissatisfied
with these options, and are often less prepared
for advanced linguistics study or the workforce. So the proposed program
uses existing courses to fill in a BA in linguistics. – Any questions regarding the linguistics bachelor of arts? Thank you Provost. Musical theater performance option in the theater BFA. – So the University of Montana’s school of theater and dance, and the school of music are combining existing
course work in their schools into an interdisciplinary option in musical theater performance under the existing BFA in theater. No similar program at the
bachelors level exists in Montana. And there is strong demand
for this type of program regionally, and nationally. We have articulation agreements in place with Flathead Valley Community College for their two year transfer students with an associates in arts who are interested in theater and music. The program uses current
faculty and courses, and is the culmination of
several years of planning and strategic hiring. – Any questions regarding the musical
theater performance option in theater BAF? – [Provost Harbor] I’ll
be more entertaining if one of those students did this. (laughter) – Good point. You’re doing great. Communicative sciences and
disorders leveling certificate. – Yeah. The University of Montana’s
department of speech, language and hearing sciences has offered a communicative
sciences and disorders post back leveling program as a non degree offering for two years with typical enrollments of
about 25 students online, and 10 students face to face. The program provides
students who did not complete their first degree in communicative sciences and disorders with foundational knowledge
in speech, language, and hearing development so that they’re eligible to apply to graduate programs in speech language pathology and audiology. Formalizing this program
into a certificate will allow the students in the program to apply for financial aid and receive a recognized
credential upon completion. There certificate has been designed to integrate with the proposed
speech language pathology audiology assistant certificate that I’ll talk about next. – Any questions about the communicative sciences
and disorders leveling certificate? Move on Provost. – So this same department is proposing a speech language pathology audiology assistant certificate, both online and face to face. Students completing the certificate are qualified to serve in a supervised assistant role to a certified speech language pathologist and or audiologist. The US Bureau of Labor statistics projects that the demand
for these assistants will grow faster than most occupations between now and 2026, with an average of 40 annual job openings in Montana. The department is worked with the Montana Board of Speech Language
Pathologists and Audiologists, the state licensing board, the Montana Council of Administrators of Special Education, the Montana Speech Language
Hearing Association, and the Montana Office
of Public Instruction to insure the program
provides a career track toward a position in the
Montana public school system. UM anticipates most enrolled
students will attend online. And most courses in
the proposed curriculum are already offered online, or face to face in the communicative
sciences and disorders post bachelorette leveling program. No similar program exists at other Montana campuses. – Any questions about the speech language pathology
audiology assistant certificate? Regent Albrecht. – Provost Harbor, where, so somebody seeking this elsewhere outside of the state, how close would be the nearest program, or where are they seeking this elsewhere? Do you know? – That’s a great question. I don’t know the answer to where there are other programs
outside the state. – I’m just grateful that
you are fulfilling this need in the state of Montana. And I was curious about that. Thank you. – Any other questions? Before we leave this grouping of majors, minors,
options and certificates, I want to thank you for bringing this to us all at once. And I think it shows the
level of work that’s been done at the University of Montana to clarify and to simplify and coordinate. So I really do appreciate the way that you’re doing this, and the way that you’re
bringing it to the board in a very understandable way. – Madam Chair, can I just
add to that, briefly. – [Regent Sheehy] Please. – And you’ll notice if
you’re following along, the executive summary actually has an OCHE recommendation beneath each item. And the recommendations
here are all approve. But that’s just kind of
the tip of the iceberg. This, this moment is the culmination
of a really, really long process, so there’s a
lot of back and forth. Some program proposals are put on hold. Some are rejected along the way. And so I want everyone to
understand that this is the result of a very careful process. The University of Montana’s been very good about reaching out to our office, and discussing how this fits into some of your longer term plans. And although they don’t show up in the level two proposals here, there are also, there’s
a series of programs being put into moratorium
along the way as well. So it’s part of a larger kind of redesign. And I just thought it was
important to mention that as we work through a very large
number of program approvals. Thank you. – Any other comments or questions? I’m going to adjourn this
portion of the meeting temporarily. Throw it back to Chair Albrecht because I think that it is
now time for public comment, according to our agenda, which we should do on time. – Thank you, Regent Sheehy. At this point, I would welcome any public comments. (group chatter) Welcome, can you please state your name? – My name is Morgan Martinez. Oh, sorry. Right. Okay, my name is Morgan Martinez. I’m the representative for
the Carpenters, Millwrights, and Pile Drivers for the state of Montana. I represent about 40 people that are working
for the university system right now on various campuses. And if you’ll notice we’re one of the holdouts that hasn’t finalized our collective bargaining process just yet. And I wanted to come
before the Board of Regents just to let you know why that was. Our group is working in predominantly
Bozeman, Missoula, of course Billings and Butte. And we’re finding it very difficult to be able to work through some of the increases that are being presented to us. Mr. Kevin McCray has done an excellent job in trying to discuss with us what the budget allows for the university systems to do. He’s definitely been and open air for us to be able to come and communicate with. And so this is no complaints
against university system in that regard, or Kevin, at all. He’s done a really good job
of communicating with us. Our problem, I guess, is basically if you get down
to the nuts and bolts of it, is accepting a 2% over a two year period. It’s very hard for my carpenters to be able to bring their families up and have a life filled with dignity when we’re looking at 40 cent increases. And we appreciate working
for the university systems. A lot of the, a lot of my members, it’s a real source of pride for them to be able to do that. We even had a gentleman at the bargaining table actually start to cry because he cares so much about his part in making sure
that these students are able to fulfill their dreams. And it’s a part of his
dream to watch that happen. And we have situations now where we have our members having to have two jobs, and also their spouses
having to have a job. And we don’t hold the
university system responsible for every life decision that our member make, for sure. But we want to be able to make sure that we being, getting paid the amount that is
reflective of the skills and responsibilities that
are laid upon us everyday. And so I just wanted to come to this board and let you now that that’s why we haven’t settled yet. And we continue to bargain. But it certainly isn’t
because we’re ungrateful. And I want to let you know that all of our, all of our members truly, truly appreciate working for the university system. But we’ve had a, I guess a Y in the road where we have to make a decision on what we’re gonna do going forward. And right now, we can’t, we don’t seem
to be able to get there at 2% over two years. – [Chair Albrecht] Thank you. – Thank you. – [Chair Albrecht] Any
further public comment? – Madam Chair, member of the board, for the record, my name is Russ Fillner. It’s F-I-L-L-N-E-R. And for the 14 years, I’ve worked right here at Helena College. I have been the fiscal and budget manager supervising those
functions for this campus. I have supervised and
managed the facilities and plant operations here at this campus. I have off and on over the years been in charge of the IT department, all of the retail operations. I’ve sat on, I just heard the labor negotiations. I’ve been involved in labor negotiations for this campus. I was the representative from this campus for many years on the
MUS Benefits committee. And for my entire term here, that I was here, I have been on MUS Worker Comp committee. Those are just some of the
things that I have done for the MUS system, and for this campus in those 14 years. On January 29, I was called into Interim
Dean Lacy’s office, and I was handed a letter
indicating that I was no longer going to be
renewed on my contract. There was no indication
as to why that was, other than a vague comment about a reorganization. The indication was not to do anything with me, the work that I have done, my character, or anything else. Just that there was going to
be some kind of reorganization, of which I still can’t
tell you what that is or how that was going to come about. I was then escorted to my office, given a box, to which I then placed
all of my personal items, and was escorted off the campus, and told that my services
would no longer be needed and that I would be paid out until June 30 for the remainder of my contract on administrative leave. My understanding is I’m not alone in this, that there were others in the system that this
occurred to as well in slightly different ways. There was another on this campus that was handled in a similar sort of way. Although I believe they are still working to the end of their contract. There were people at
OCHE that were handled similar to this. There are people at some
of the other campuses that the same thing happened to. Some of the things that
are of interest and note to this are my particular position, if it was a state level position, given the way the state pay plan, merit play plan works, I would have been a protected class. I would have been a permanent employee, not a at will employee. A major difference between
working in the university system versus working in the state. The state, I would have been eligible for their riff pool. There is no such thing
in the university system. Although today, we heard discussion about jobs that are open in the university system, but there has been no indications, no communications whatsoever, directly with myself at least, about the potential of any
of those open positions being available or being made available to any of us who have been released from our contracts. Missoula, a couple of years ago, they had to do a major reduction in force. My understanding is that they offered, as part of that, some pay to people to help them get through that transition, to help them take early retirement and leave. I don’t know all the specifications. I’ve heard that it was up to a six month of their salary that they were offered to take an early retirement. I was, I requested, I am currently 58 years old. I will turn 59 in August. I requested if there was any way that I could stay with the system through August of 2020, which is when I would become 60 years old, which is a key point in the PERS retirement system for retiring. And I was refused. There was no consideration, no conversation other than just a refusal of that. So, I’m sharing this with you just primarily to bring to your, to light to this group, and to your understanding of some of the operations
and the way they occur within the university system versus some of the other
areas within state government. I think there are some
of those things that should be reviewed. It should be looked at. Is it necessary that at will employees go that deep into the system, or should there be more protection for some
of the professionals who go to work in the
Montana university system? So just something for you to think about. Some other things I’d
like to share with you since I have been with the system for over 14 years is some, I’ll just say some perceptions that I have over some changes, some things I’ve seen
over the last 14 years in the university system. The system, when I started, was extremely collaborative. We had teams that worked across, we didn’t care whether
you were part of the Montana State, the University of Montana. We had budget teams that met that were from across all those campuses and had individuals
from all those campuses. We had people who got together back in, I think it was
somewhere around 2006, 2007. And we sat down. That’s when we were
underneath the very old formulaic way of allocating funds. And we put the numbers together, and at that point in time, Northern would have been wiped out. If we had run the formula and done the formula the
way it was supposed to, Northern would have been
closing their doors. They couldn’t operate with
the amount of reduction and FTE, and the other things the formulas would have done to them. As a group, we threw the formula out because that was not what that group and that set of people decided on doing. And since then, this whole system has been attempting to
try and grapple with and find a new formula. And it’s a very difficult thing to do because one formula doesn’t fit everything and every circumstance. But those are some of the things that we used to do as a team, as a group. That we would come together
and we would deal with those. And it doesn’t seem to be any more the way I see things happening in the system anymore. Some of the other things
that I have seen is take this meeting right now. How many of the campuses
are sitting at this table talking directly to you as Board of Regents? Two. With the exception of the host campus, which on occasions, when it’s at one of the flagship campuses, then you still only have two. When I began working in this system, all of the campuses had a seat at the table facing you, the regents the people that they worked for to discuss issues, and to discuss things. And that’s one of the things
that I’ve seen over time is this slow slippage
away from the inclusion of all the voices in the university system down to a much narrower focus, a much more hierarchal
approach to doing things in the system. Any expectation that, not that Seth or Waded don’t share information and that the information doesn’t flow out. But timing of that information, the ability to understand what going on behind it. I mean at the legislature, when they put together a bill and they pass a bill, they also have behind that a lot of the information about the intent. And you have to go and read that sometimes to figure out why this piece
of legislation happened. Well sometimes that’s the same thing now that happens in the system. Is we sit around and
scratch our heads going why are they doing some of these things that they’re doing at the lower levels, because we weren’t involved, or didn’t have an opportunity to be involved in what was happening in those decisions that were being made. Some of the other areas that I’ve seen some changing in. You know, is with access to you and access to the legislature. Here several years ago, there was information that
went out to the campuses that said you will not contact a board member or a legislator without first notifying
the commissioner’s office that you’re going to do that. And that when you’re done, you’re supposed to provide a report back to the commissioner’s office of what was spoken about, and what the purpose of the meeting was. And not that I find that bad that there’s information sharing, but it’s just it seems
a little bit awkward to every time that you have something that comes up. And you have the need to work with your, you know, representatives, to have to go through and try
to track down the right person to get permission to do it, when sometimes those things require a more timely activity to occur. So just as I said, these are my perceptions, my things that I have seen over time that have changed. There’s this big push
towards the concept of everything relying on data. I’m a CPA. I love data. I love numbers. I love it when I go to the store and I buy groceries and it comes out to an even dollar amount. It doesn’t have any
pennies on the end of it. I mean it’s like woo
hoo, I won the lottery. No, not really. That would be nice. But, to rely on data at such a level that you don’t involve the people who truly drive that data, that are working with
the students frontline, the faculty, the student support people, even the people in the business offices, and you’re just looking at it in a vacuum can be a problem sometimes
from my perspective. I think you need to use that data and use it effectively. You need to make sure that you bring in the voices of the people that are driving and creating that data. – Excuse me, Mr. Fillner. It appears you’re reading
something on your phone. You, we would certainly welcome you to submit written testimony. That might even be more helpful. – [Mr. Fillmore] I’m almost done. – Okay. – These are, you have to understand, my notes are like not probably readable by other people. These are just like things I threw out this thing so I would remind me what I was gonna say. The last comment I’ll make and then I’ll finish up here. And this one really hits home
to me right at the moment. And I’ll try not to get emotional
over saying this one is, I mean today we just had the introduction of the new individual up at the University of Montana. Sounds like an amazingly good individual. I’ve also been in meetings for 14 years where this system has talked
about how important it is. We need to educate the people of the state of Montana. We need to create jobs for the people of the state of Montana. We need to do things to support the economy of the state of Montana. We need to make this state
and our people prosperous, and yet it’s my perception again, which may be wrong, that more often than not, at the highest levels in our system, here, in state government, and other places, when it comes down to filling those jobs, the people we hire aren’t Montanans, and weren’t educated in Montana. What does that say? What does that underlying statement to the people of this state about the education system in the state of Montana? What does that say about the MUS if we the people who
are running that system won’t dedicate to hiring and
putting our own graduates in at the highest levels of our system? So I thank you very much for your time. I’m not here to tell
you how to do your jobs. I’m not here to say any of this stuff is good or bad, otherwise. But at this moment, I felt it was necessary for me to come in and share my viewpoints, and to make you aware of some things that are happening in the system. So thank you very much. – Thank you Mr. Fillner. Any further public comment? – [Dr. Munn] Madam Chair,
Deputy Commissioner, if I may. Members of the board. I’d just like to follow up on what Mr. Fillner was saying. If that’s okay? If not, that’s okay. – No. If you would like to move and do public comment on your own behalf, you’re welcome to do that. What? (inaudible) – [Dr. Munn] I think
I will if that’s okay. – Could you hold for one moment? Helen. Okay. Thank you, any further public comment? Any further public comment? Seeing none, we will move back to the ARSA committee. – Unless you want the break. – Yes. I see cupcakes. (laughter) Let’s go ahead and take a 10 minute break and enjoy what’s been presented to us over in the corner. And we will resume in about 10 minutes. Thank you. (group chatter) Good afternoon. Can we please have everyone
return to their seats? (group chatter) Before we move back into the agenda with the ARSA committee, I would just like to take this point to make a point of clarification. By all appearances during public comment, Dr. Munn had indicated that he wanted to provide public comment, and I certainly would not want anyone to misinterpret that as suppression of his intentions. Dr. Munn, if you would like to provide public comment, you’re welcome to. – Yeah, Madam Chair, members of the board, thank you. I guess I would like to start off by saying I did not feel shut down, as I was told, oh they shut him down. I did not feel that way. I’d rather give something in writing. And frankly, this is my
first time in the rodeo here. So if any protocol, I would be happy to follow. So I feel no, I don’t feel anything
like being shut down. So it’s just fine. Thank you very much. – Thank you Dr. Munn. And we certainly welcome
your written testimony of any kind. Okay, thank you. At this point, I would
like to turn the meeting back over to Regent Sheehy, who is chairing our ARSA committee. Chari Sheehy. – Thank you Chair Albrecht. We are back to the level two action items. We are on University of
Montana research centers, or institutes. There are two items here. Ah, Provost Harbor. – [Provost Harbor] No, note on
which is on and which is off. That’s good. – I can hear you. – So, our first request is to establish the Montana youth sports safety institute. This institute aims to
meet a need for research, advocacy and training in sports safety for youth sports organizations in Montana. The institute would develop policy advice, needs analysis, and trainings to improve safety in youth sports within Montana’s more than 150
youth sports organizations. Montana currently ranks 49th among states in implementing health and safety policies to prevent sudden death
and catastrophic injury in secondary school athletics. The clinics, trainings, and policy support of this institute will make a real and needed difference for Montana youth sports safety. The work has current grant funding from the Foundation for Community Health. And the establishment of an institute will strengthen future grant requests. – Thank you. Any questions regarding
the Montana Youth Sports Safety Institute? Regent Tuss. – Thank you Chair Sheehy. Thank you for bringing this before us. I think this is kind of a big deal. Really youth sports safety, we’ve read a lot about this through nationwide press. And so I’m pleased that we’re perhaps at the forefront of
doing something about it. My question, which is a question that I also asked during our
committee conference call is will you be coordinating the efforts of this institute with the Montana high school association, which is the sanctioning agency for high school youth sports in Montana? And could you talk a little bit about who these 150 youth
sports organizations are? – Yeah, that’s a great question. I wasn’t actually prepped
for the 150 youth sports organizations, so I can’t give you the detail on that unfortunately. But I can follow up on that with you. In terms of coordinating with all the appropriate
high school organizations, absolutely. The team that put this together has been working very hard to make sure that it is well coordinated with the appropriate organizations. Because that’s where the
difference can be made. – Any other questions or comments? Hearing none, let’s talk about establishing the center for population health research. – Yes, the center for
population health research will support approaches for identifying, modifying, and testing interventions applicable to the health of children residing in rural communities. A context that is both understudied, and distinct from
traditional urban health. The centers goal is to
support a critical mass of Montana researchers to address rural children’s health issues, and to establish research support cause that provide researchers
with state of the art technical tools. It will also support outreach
and knowledge translation to expand opportunities for effective rural oriented research. There are few federally
funded research centers focused on rural health, and none in the west region that focus on prevention research for children, rural children’s health. The center is seeking a
centers of biomedical research excellence, COBRE Award through the National Institute of Health to support start up costs as the center builds a grant portfolio that can provide sustained support. – Any questions? Chair Albrecht. – So Provost Harbor, I can understand that you want this to be strategically focused. Is there an opportunity down the road within this where you could expand beyond children? I’m completely supportive of this, but. – Absolutely. The initial positioning is related to the opportunity
to apply for this NIH funding, and so that’s the starting point. But absolutely, it’s something that is positioned to expand over time. – Okay, population health is of critical importance. So I’m glad you’re not limiting yourself in that regard down the road. Thank you. – Any other questions? Seeing none, we next move to a group that we’ve called
retitling, consolidating, or reorganization, or reorganizing academic programs or units. (laughter) Sorry. (laughter) We’ll cross that out. Reorganizing academic programs or units. Go ahead. – The Big Sky Culinary
Institute, and I want to provide a statement of clarification. As you know, there is board policy to establish an educational institute. This is not the purpose of this request. This is simply a branding request to rename the Big Sky Culinary Institute. This is based on the fact
that the term institute is a very common nomenclature within culinary arts programs. As an example, three of
the top rated programs in the country are the
Culinary Institute of America, the Institute of Culinary Education, and the New England Culinary Institute. And so it is just, the intent is just to align our program and our services with the term institute. – Any questions? Thank you dean. Oh, got one. Regent Lozar. – Thank you Chair Sheehy. It seems very confusing to have the Culinary Institute of Montana, Big Sky Culinary Institute. And I don’t see President Caris here, but if you could maybe
briefly just touch on sort of the conversation that you had. – We had conversations with the leadership at Flathead
Valley community college. And they were understanding and supportive of our request. (audio cuts out) – Thank you Dean. Next item is retitle the department of counselor education to the department of counseling. Provost Harbor. – So the university departments, the University of Montana’s
department of counselor education proposes to change it’s name to the department of counseling. This new name will accurately reflects the breadth of professionals the department trains. There was a large and growing unmet need for counseling, both
regionally and nationwide. And this is an area for investment for the University of Montana that will allow the department
to expand it’s staffing. The adjusted name reflects
a professional shift in the nomenclature of similar
departments nationwide. – Any questions? Another worthy clarification, I think. Our next item is to establish a department
of public administration and policy. – So with us today are professor Sarah Renfrey who would lead the department
of public administration and policy, and Paul Kirgis, dean of the Blewitt School of Law if there’s needs for additional questions. So the University of Montana proposes to establish a department
of public administration and policy as a new unit within the
Blewitt School of law. The new department will house faculty delivering UM’s master
of public administration, the public administration certificate, the non-profit certificate, and the non-profit minor. These faculty have previously been housed in the department of political science. The department will be aligned
with the Bacchus Institute. And the program has a strong joint program with the school of law. Program curriculums will not be changed. A recent accreditation team visit highlighted the strength
of UM’s NPA program and noted that most NPA programs were housed outside of
political science departments. This is a move that
aligns with expectations for nationally accredited
public administration programs. The accreditation team
was also very positive about the potential move
to the school of law, and saw this as a unique
strength of the program that will make it even more
attractive and effective. The NPA program has an applied focus and can be completed online and in person. – Any questions? Regent Tuss. – Thank you. My question is similar
to the question I had during our ARSA conversation. I like the elevation of public administration
to the department level. But I’m still trying to figure out the rational behind moving that particular academic unit from its historic place at the College of
Humanities and Sciences over to the School of Law. And if somebody could do
a little bit deeper dive into the decision why that was made. What was the ah ha moment that said that’s where this belongs? – So part of it is the alignment
of professional programs. And so when you think of the various colleges and schools at the University of Montana, some of them are focused on undergraduate education and academic research. Others have more of a focus
on professional training. The NPA program, like the school of law, is more focused on providing a high value professional training path. But that’s less typical
in a college of humanities and sciences, and the Department of Political Science. – [Sheehy] President Bodnar.
– Madam Chair, if I could add too that. This, we’ve also had the establishment of the Bacchus Institute with the ambassador and former Senator Bacchus, which is housed under the law school. And is focused on public service, on diplomacy. And as we bring these programs together, we really are establishing the University of Montana as a unique center for the study of law, policy and service. The fact that you have an NPA in law school together with the Bacchus Institute, the Bacchus leadership program that we established last year with the donation to send some of our students, some of our NPA students, some of our undergrads on internships over the
course of the summer to work at the highest
level in Washington DC. We have a unique
combination of efforts there that really establishes this as a, as a special program. And I will tell you, the accreditors, they came to visit from around the country were very excited, and said you have
something very special here with this combination. – Any other questions? I have a question for Dean Kirgis. And so does Chair Albrecht. Paul, throughout this proposal, we’ve heard a lot about the housing of these programs. And based on a very dim memory of the space at the University of Montana School of Law, where are these things physically? – I’m sure you remember Faculty Row? That’s where they are. So with the construction
of the new building completed in 2010, we moved all of the law faculty offices into the new building. And then that opened up space in what used to be the faculty row on the north side on Maurice Avenue. And so that whole wing of the law school, we are devoting to the Bacchus Institute and related programing. So the NPA faculty are
already in those offices. – And will there be an increase in the number of students, non law students, who are physically present in the law building? – Yes. Now most of the NPA students are taking classes online. So, it’s not as big as you might expect given the population of
students in the NPA program. And because they need to
work on flexible schedules with the professionals that they teach, their classes tend to be out of sequence with the other law school classes. – [Regent Sheehy] So it’s your opinion that this is all gonna
work out logistically? – Yeah. We’re already doing it. – Okay. – Yeah. – [Regent Sheehy] Great. Chair Albrecht. – Thanks Dean Kirgis. I was along a similar line, just understanding capacity to do this within. If you could speak to that. – Yeah, we feel we have the capacity. And this is where the Bacchus Institute’s really been helpful. The NPA program has grown by about 300%
in the last five years, in terms of student population from the low 20s to over 100 now. And so that created some
resource needs for them. And through the Bacchus Institute, and the law school, we’ve been able to help them
meet the needs they have to serve their students. So for example, we were just able to hire
an administrative assistant, which the program had never had before. And we used private funding from the Bacchus Institute to do that. – And then a quick followup clarifier. If, when somebody receives a degree, it’s just housed under there. But they receive a master
of public administration. – From the University of Montana. All of the degrees are
University of Montana. – [Chair Albrecht] Right, right. But okay. Okay. Thank you. – Thank you Dean. Any other questions? Let’s see, were are we? We are on the item, consolidate the school of art and school of media arts into a merged school of
visual and media arts. – So these two academics proposed to merge to form a single unit, the school of visual and media arts. There has been exciting and rapid change in the fine arts because of
advances in digital media. And the school of art
has updated many areas to incorporate digital technology and data arts into its traditional programs. At the same time, the school of media arts has been growing rapidly because of the interest and expansion of digital media. The two schools offer related coursework that under the current arrangement can be difficult to coordinate. The consolidation will
reduce administrative costs, and enhance coordination, integration in ways that will benefit students in the existing degree programs. – Any questions? I have one. During our ARSA committee, I went off on a tangent about the journalism school because I thought that the media arts had to do with the press. This has nothing to do with the J school or media. – No, it has nothing to
do with the J school, though the J School and media arts obviously have a lot of overlap and enjoy doing things together as well. – Okay. Thank you. Any other questions? Next, consolidate the
department of applied computing and engineering technology into the department of
business technology. Dean McClain. – Yes, this request has
come about as a result of significant reductions
in tenure lined faculty over the last several years
in these two departments. And what’s that’s done is it’s created a challenging environment for both collaboration, and more importantly for conducting duties related to the
collective bargaining agreement, such as establishing faculty
evaluation committees. So by merging the two departments, you’ll have a large
enough faculty contingent to be able to deal with
collective bargaining agreement duties. As well as then by
merging, we also eliminate one department chair, so there will also be
fiscal savings as well. – Any questions? Thank you dean. Provost Harbor, retitle the Rural Institute. – So we request authorization to retitle the Rural Institute as Center for Excellence in
Developmental Disabilities to the Rural Institute, a Center for Excellence on Disabilities. This change will better reflect
the work of the institute, which works on disabilities that occur across the lifespan, not only those that have their genesis during a person’s developmental years, as the current title suggests. This revised title will make us consistent with many other centers in the 67 center network nationwide. It will make the mission
clearer to funding agencies. – Any questions regarding the retitling? Next item, terminate the Institute for Educational Research and Service. Provost Harbor. – So of the past five years, the Institute for Educational
Research and Service within the College of Education and Human Sciences has experienced a decline in
the number of funded projects. Several programs under the institute have been completed and closed. And the national Native
Children’s Trauma Center, and the Montana Safe School Center that were formally housed
within the institute now operate successfully as
fully independent centers. Thus the need for the
institute has declined and we are moving to sunset it. – Thank you, any questions? That brings us to the end
of the level two items. – [Provost Harbor]
Thank you all very much. – Thank you, Provost Harbor. Regents, do you have any
questions or comments concerning the extensive level two agenda that we had today? Regent Albrecht. – I just want to commend Provost Harbor and the work that’s been done. I know this has been a lot of work to really look at alignment, and efficiencies, and effectiveness, and strengthening the core. So thank you for all of your work. It’s impressive. – Any other comments? Thank you so much University of Montana, and Provost Harbor, and Dean McClain for that presentation. – Madam Chair, if I may. We have a few more items on the agenda. I’m looking at the clock. I can move very quickly
through item C and D when we get there. I am going to request that we move ahead and have the AIMA update, and the update on the
student mental health and wellness program. And I’ll ask our presenters to adapt and to be crisp
in their presentations. But I think this
material’s quite important. So hopefully we can just work to the end. – Thank you, I agree. Deputy Commissioner McLean. – Thank you Madam Chair, members of the board. I appreciate this
opportunity to join you today in celebrating the great work of the American Indian and
Minority Achievement Council. And along with that, I’d like to share with you the great summit that we held on the campus of Montana
State University in January. I’d also like to visit with you about the roll out of the Indian Education For All in Montana for one MUS course that is rolling out as we speak on our campuses across the
Montana university system. And then finally share with you a quick glimpse about what
the AIMA Council up to next on behalf of the students that we have the privilege to serve. The first thing I’d like to do is show you the American Indian
Minority Achievement Council and point you to a few other things on the link that is on our website. There’s a nice picture of us taken in the hallway at Montana State University. And when Heather gets this up, what you’ll see is the bios and the photos of
the members of the council. But also, along the left side there, you’re going to see all of the work that is being done by the AIMA program as we speak. So all of the resources that you, or anyone on our campuses, or our students and our families
across the state will need, they would find right there in a one stop shop. And we think that’s a really good thing for all of our students
to serve them best. Additionally, I’d like to move on and discuss with you the very important American Indian Minority
Achievement Council summit that we held on the campus at MSU on January 18. It was the Friday right before the Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr. holiday. And it was a wonderful summit. And we had the privilege
to host it here in Montana as a result of the Lumina Foundation, and their generosity. And you may recall that we were one of 19 grants funded through the Lumina Foundation out of 312 applicants. And they were very excited about the work that we were already doing on behalf of American
Indian student success and they wanted to make more of an investment in what we were doing. I want to thank Montana State University for their graciousness in making sure that we all felt at home on your campus as we explored how we could better serve American Indian students wherever we lived, and in whatever roll
and position that we had in any of our campuses, or OCHE positions. They campuses brought 110 attendees to the AIMA Summit. MUS four year, two year community colleges, and tribal colleges were at the table having
very important conversations. We were joined there by campus presidents, chancellors, deans, staff, faculty and students. This picture shows two of the students from Montana State University, Zach Phelsman, who played
the drums and sang, and Dawson Demontanae, who spoke on behalf of American Indian students there at Montana State University and across the MUS. And I think gave an
outstanding presentation about how education can help students overcome even the most
remarkable challenges. We enjoyed a great welcome by President Waded Cruzado. And if you would please, Dr. Mowka, extend our sincere appreciation to her for her great remarks that morning as well. Throughout the day, we engaged in campus and departmental level conversations, and work sessions. And there were takeaways from every single activity in which everyone would
engage in throughout the day. And so it wasn’t just a sit and get. It was a make sure you are participating, and even to get to have lunch, you had to present a lunch ticket, which indicated that you
were paying attention, and tell us what you had learned. And we quickly put that up on the screen. We also had a very informative
tribal college panel. And with that, we had four
tribal college presidents right now, and one who
was a past president speak to some of the issues
that we’re addressing in the Montana university city system, and some of the challenges that those issues pose
to the tribal colleges and to the students. An outstanding panel. We also had the same folks
that are here videoing this meeting today. Thank you very much for the
great work that you did. Video the summit. And so what we have done at the office of the commissioner is we begun to break down those videos of each of the segments of the summit so that we can put them
on our AIMA website, and that will be a resource for anyone across the state of Montana. Because there were great messages by anyone who went to the podium, or who sat at the panel tables throughout the day. Additionally, we had a great opportunity to be joined by our very own Regent Lozar. And he gave one of the
most remarkable keynotes I have every had the privilege of hearing. And so what I would like to do is share with you a segment of his presentation to the summit, because I think this is perhaps one of the most poignant
parts of the conversation as it points directly to every bit of the work that you do, and we all do on behalf
of students’ success. – We literally had no idea that we were poor. (inaudible) for our tribe. (inaudible) 12 business owner, and eventually became councilman. For our tribe, (inaudible) But we were poor, but we didn’t know. But one thing that we did know is that education was important. Education was important. And I think that it really stems form my great grandmother, Grandma C. Grandma C, when she was six years old, was taken off of Flathead and put on a train and sent down to Haskell in Kansas. A six year old. I got, my oldest kids are seven. (inaudible) I can’t fathom what that experience must have been like. From age six to age 17, she was in Haskell. And I can guarantee there were hard, hard times for her. But she had, she had
something in her that said I am going to get there. In about six months
before she supposed to get whatever it was a credential during those times, she actually had to come home and take care of her parents who were very sick. So she didn’t get that opportunity to get that credential. But she passed down that, that value that education is important to my grandpa, who, who went to the University of Montana. He was, he may have been the first Native American, if not one of the first Native Americans basketball players to play at the University of Montana. He played under Dolber. He didn’t actually get this opportunity to get a degree. He had quit the basketball team, and joined the war effort. World War II, went out to the Pacific. But he passed down that love for education, and that value that education
was important to my dad who ended up getting an associates degree, and then a bachelors degree, and close to a masters degree. And then, and then of course, my mother, who in her 40s, finally finished up getting her degree at (inaudible) community college. So this idea that education
is important has been something that has been
very close to our family for many, many generations. I think that makes things
a little bit unique. For me, it was just expected that we would go to college. And there was, and I
really appreciate this about my parents, but there was no deep conversation about the benefits of education. There was no conversation about student loan debts, or what it means to finance to get higher education, or job prospects, or where do you want to work, or even (inaudible) university. There was none of that. I was just told, it probably will be good for you to go. and it will help you help people. They took me off the reservation for the first time. We lived in the same house that I had lived in my whole entire life, away from a giant family, and away from a community
that really supported me. It was an exciting time, and also extraordinarily
confusing time for me. But I took the medicine, the higher education medicine. And I went on to earn
three different degrees, and an entire campus worth
of student owned debt, which I’m still paying back. I’m sure I will be when
my kids are in college. And I am passing down that
value of education to my kids. In fact, my two older boys, I heard them the other day
sort of arguing back and forth, not about where they
were going to college, but they were really getting, starting to get concerned about which college was gonna
draft them for football. (inaudible)
(laughter) One’s a bobcat fan, one’s a (inaudible). Higher education was
absolutely worth it to me. Higher education is absolutely worth it to all of these students in the university system
today, and the tribal colleges. (applause) – So you can find the entire speech soon on the AIMA website MUS.edu. And he was just outstanding, and I think continues to get
remarkable feedback about the extraordinary remarks, and the message that you
imparted for all of us. And I hope that every
single one of the folks who attended the summit, and I see so many of you
here in the room today, left there with a very clear understanding that American Indian student success, that conversation about it, belongs to every single one of us. And each of the campuses was left with a couple of tasks. One was to resubmit
their AIMA action plans, which you approved last
March at this meeting. And then the second request was that they would submit to our office a best practice, because that’s part of
where the AIMA Council will go next. And before I get to that
point in my remarks, I would like to introduce you to the Indian Education For All in Montana for one MUS course. And our campuses are rolling
this out as we speak. We have it all ready existing
on some of our campus portals. And it will continue to roll out as it is developed on
other learning platforms across the Montana university system. We’re working with the tech teams. We’re working with the
AIMA Council members on this roll out. We’re providing them guidance, a one pager that they can use to introduce the course on their campuses, so that folks understand
the why behind it. And just as a reminder, you may recall that you approved
those five recommendations, and recommendations four and five of those five recommendations spoke exactly to the fact that every single campus had to do all they could to ensure professional development about Montana’s first peoples would happen for all of
their faculty and staff, and then all of their incoming faculty and staff. And so right now, we have the course, and it is ready to rock and roll all across the university system. And we look forward to that continuing to roll out. And what you see here is really just a quick overview of what that might look like as some of your campuses across the state begin to roll this out. There are videos. There’s interactive activities. There’s assessments in there. And we really tried as a council to make this very relevant and contemporary. And we worked with the
Office of Public Instruction, and Mike Jetti there. We worked with members of the Council. And if I could quickly, I’d like to move to the next slide so that we could recognize some of the folks who played a real key roll in getting this course to where it was. In addition to the council, we had Dr. Squires at the University of Montana, and Joe and Marlene Zens. I’m not sure how many hours they put into this, but we moved the course from the Office of Public Instructions hub and we needed a place for it. And they took it, and they transformed the entire course. And we are continuing to work on every day transformation, making it better, updating it so that it is the best course
that it can possibly be. And if you would please express one more time our sincere appreciation to them. I’d also like to thank Mike Jetti, the AIMA Council members, and Tracy Elig from Montana State University for his guidance and support in making sure that the roll out and the development is happening with the Montana State
University campuses as well. He and I will continue to work with all of our teams to make
sure that this is launched in a very seamless fashion. And then the last thing I
would like to close with for all of you is that the work of the council has been considerable. And it has been very rich. And these are council members
who come from our campuses. They come from the Office
of Public Instruction. We have Boyd St. Pierre, who comes from Rocky Boy. And they give of their
time and their talents to make a difference in
the lives of the students that we all have the very significant privilege of serving. And so our next steps, we lay the groundwork for this when we sent out all
of the pre summit work. Will be to develop Indian Education for All across our campuses so that it is happening in a strategic by design way, and so that everybody
from the math professor to the science professor to the custodian, to the campus president understand that the conversation about Indian education for All is one that they own right along with their
neighbors down the street. So with that, I’ll conclude my remarks. And I will open it up for any questions that you might have. – Thank you Director McLean. Any questions or comments? Hearing none, thank you so much. Information item B, student mental health and wellness update. Deputy Commissioner Tessman. – Thank you Madam Chair. And Angela, you mentioned
the work of everyone else, thank you for the work
you’ve done on this effort. It’s a big deal. So I much appreciate it. It just reminds us, and listening to Regent Lozar’s remarks, re-grounding ourselves in the impact that education has on individual students is such an important part of our work. And it was so rewarding to hear from our students, Cheyenne and Wyatt, earlier today, I think. My boss is not here, but I’d love for us to maybe commit to having a student or two come up every board meeting and talk about an
experience of MUS education. Our next presentation is actually from Christine Miller, who’s our student success specialist in the Commissioner’s Office. This is a new position. And one of the first things
that I’ve asked Christine to look at is I guess a holistic approach
to student success. And that involves building
on some of the great work that’s already been going on within the Montana university system. And finding new paths forward for student mental health and wellness. So Christine. – Thanks for the introduction, Deputy Commissioner Tessman. Madam Chair and members of the committee, I just want to say that the things I’m gonna talk
to you about today, briefly, to appreciate all of our time. But this is really building on the work of the previous iteration
of the suicide prevention and mental health taskforce that members all across the Montana university system participated in. And that effort was led by Ron Muffick from out office. So I just want to acknowledge everybody’s work in that. Can you go to the next slide, Heather? Thanks. So I just want to point out to you a couple of pretty staggering statistics about mental health and
suicide in our state. I’m not gonna go through all of these, but the two things I do want to note that there’s a rather high rate of suicide in Montana. And as you’ll see in this
last three bullet points, that there are disparate outcomes for underrepresented groups. And so those are just two things that I wanted to note for your attention. I don’t want to note these to be alarmist, but just to say that mental health is, and suicide prevention
are really important. And actually campuses are
protective environment, and so continuing the kinds
of programing and services that campuses have been doing, and that the taskforce works to advance are really important. Next slide. And there has been a lot of
ongoing work on campuses. I will note that campuses
across the system and in the state have been doing a lot, and that this has been an
ongoing priority for them. But the suicide and mental health, suicide prevention and
mental health taskforce came together at your recommendation, and the recommendation of the commissioner in 2015. And you can see this timeline. It sort of briefly outlines a few of the things that you’ve
heard about this already. And when taken all together,
it’s pretty significant, but I also want to note that across that timeline and prior to that, and since then there’s been so much work going on on campuses. And in 2016, the suicide prevention and mental health taskforce made recommendations to the Montana university system. And campuses have been doing a lot. And you’ll hear in just a second from two of our campus representatives on that. But I just want to point
out a couple of things. One of the strongest recommendations was to have a licensed
clinician at every campus. And even some of our smallest campuses have met that. FECC, Miles Community College, and Helena College have, in addition to other campuses, that have since recommendations increased, or even added a clinician who was not
prior to that present. You’ll see around the campus here today that there is posters for Fresh Check day, which is an even going on on campuses to support student wellness, suicide prevention, and awareness. And there’s a lot of events going on around campuses across the system. The system hosted a MSU put together a suicide prevention summit in 2016. A lot of campuses have been bringing, they’ve been integrating care. And so they’ve been
bringing medical offices and mental health services together often in one building. Or they’ve been coordinating services better so that clinicians and providers can identify students better. So these are just a few of the highlights that campuses have responded to in the recommendations made. I’m gonna turn it over to Carrie Vath, who’s the dead of students and associate vice chancellor
of enrollment management of Montana Tech to share some of the work they’ve
been doing on their campus. – Hello everyone. What I wanted to focus on is within those recommendations, I think what’s key in that, and
on our campus in particular, is highlighting how
communicating these efforts and creating awareness can really translate to an increase in reporting. And so that’s what I wanted this figure to really highlight, is that when we really
started this work in 2015, there were fewer than 10 kind of incidents that
were getting reported. And incidents can be anything from a faculty member reporting that they haven’t seen a student in a class for three sessions, to a business office specialist reporting a student with erratic behavior, or maybe some anger, to a friend reporting a peer that
they’re concerned about. And so as we look at this year, I’ve already had 55 incidents that have come to my office. So I expect that number to go up in the next two months. But this is a positive thing, because it means that we are actually able to create interventions so that we don’t have crisis on our hand. And that is really, again,
that awareness is power, reporting it, and then ability to look at our system where we can create change, how we can better message. But that this idea of
the reporting culture takes time and it’s being cultivated. And so it is taking, you don’t just snap your fingers and send the email, and people know to report. And so it’s really exciting to see all of the hard work over the last four years paying off with this increase, and us being able to help students. – And I’ll have, I’ll ask Betsy Asterson, who’s a director of counseling
and psychological services at MSU to share some of the good work that they’ve been doing. – Thank you, thank you for having me back. And I had the privilege of
being a part of this taskforce, and reporting to you previously on these recommendations. And today, I’m gonna just
talk a little bit about kind of the mental health perspective, and the treatment perspective on this. One of the key takeaways
I had from that effort back in 2016 is just the realization that this is all of our responsibility to work on this issue. And the commitment and leadership from all the way from you all to OCHE, and on our campus, President Cruzado, and Vice President Kerns have been amazing champions of this work, and really supporting this. And I think that highlights the importance of the fact that it can’t just be the
clinicians doing this work. It really takes all of us to impact mental health on our campuses, and suicide prevention. At MSU, we implemented
all of the recommendations from the 2016 report. I just want to highlight
a couple of those. One of them was beginning universal
screening for depression in both our acute care
and primary care clinics within the health service. We established a campus wide working group to assess and monitor access
to lethal means on campus, including centralized weapon storage
as one part of that effort. And then collaborative
tracking and reporting of suicide attempts and completions to better
inform interventions. And that’s been huge for us to just continue that work together. Since our last update to the board, we’ve really continued to experience ongoing increases and
demands for services. Nationally, there’s
been 30 to 40% increase in the demand for counseling services at college counseling centers, while enrollment is growing
at about 5% nationally. At MSU, we’ve had a 36% increase over the last five years. And this year, to date, we’ve seen already an 18% increase from last year at this time. And a 20% increase in crisis appointments. That’s significant. 40% of our students so far this year who have come to see us have indicated that they’ve
seriously considered suicide. So that’s 655 of our
Montana state students seeking counseling. The ones who are walking
through our doors, who are experiencing that. People are sometimes surprised to hear that I actually view these increased numbers as good news, similar to what you were saying as well. But really, on our campus, what I can say is people are doing exactly what we’ve asked them to do. We ask them to identify students who might be at risk. We ask them to help us decrease the stigma for seeking mental health treatment, and that’s happening. And we ask them to encourage
people to seek help. So they’re doing exactly
what we’ve asked them to do by coming to see us. At MSU, we’re really working hard to continue to work across
offices and departments to build the full culture
of support on our campus. Where supporting mental health really is everyone’s business. Some key collaborations that
we’re continuing to work on are the integration, as Christine said, of mental health care in an
integrated behavioral health approach within our medical setting. Working with our dean of students office, as Carrie was speaking to, and the campus safety welfare program to reach those students
who might not be presenting in our center. And then to sustain the work, our cross campus mental health committee when we became a Jud campus program about four years ago. Last year, we also
increased our evidence based suicide prevention program and trained over 1,000
people on our campus in suicide prevention. So I just want to say thank
you at the end of the day to still make some time to hear about this. I know it’s sometimes a sobering topic. But I really do value everyone’s efforts on this. And I’m excited that
we’re continuing this work as a taskforce, and working together with our colleagues across the system. Thank you. – So, I just want to close, and also echo Betsy’s comments in appreciating your time and being grateful for listening to this well past our agenda time. But these really are important issues, and I think we should
all be appreciative of the really great innovative, and effective work that
campuses have been doing. I also wanted to share with you a couple of things that
have been happening. In December, Deputy Commissioner Tessman
invited Alison Moman, who’s the director, executive director of a
group called Active Minds to the campus input session. And that group is kind of a
student based organization that works to provide resources and de stigmatize mental
health issues on campuses. But that, her speaking kind
of refocused our offices, and my attention to this issue. And it seemed time to kind of check in and reconvene that taskforce, and see what campuses have been doing, and how we could move forward, and what the needs of students are going forward. And so we reconvened the
taskforce in January. And we are currently
discussing our objectives and priorities moving forward. Among those will be coordinating the separate campus
behavioral intervention teams, looking into ongoing
and sustained training for all levels of campus people, administration, staff, faculty, et cetera. And the last thing I
have to share with you is pretty exciting. Our office submitted a proposal to campus compact to host a vista, who would be completely dedicated to working on these issue, especially as that first
slide I showed you indicated. This person would be
coordinating with the task force to work on providing services, developing trainings, developing processes for tracking data around mental health and wellness, particularly as they pertain to equity and diversity. And so we are anxiously
awaiting news of that proposal. We should find out this month if we will indeed host a vista. Thanks so much for your time. And I think that we’ll
stand for any questions or comments. – Thank you so much. Any questions, Regent Tuss. – Thank you. First of all, you shouldn’t be apologizing for being over time. This is an important topic, and we need to take the
time to talk about this. Secondly, thank you. I mean there’s nothing more important than the health and safety of those that we’re educating, our student body. This is a topic that this board
takes very, very seriously. We’ve talked about it a lot. And so, thank you for this. Two questions I have. Do you have the resources right now to really do this? Do you have the resources
based on the recommendations that you put the time into
presenting to us today, system wide, to really move the needle on this issue? And secondly, are we truly making this
effort a system wide effort? Oftentimes, I think
it’s a little bit easier to be successful perhaps
at a campus like MSU, or perhaps at a campus like the U of M? How we doing at Western? How we doing at the community colleges? Are we hitting every single unit of our system in the same fashion? – So, I think in regards
to a lot of the resources, the recommendations, you don’t need as many. So implementing the depression screenings, many of the campuses were able to do that. And so that’s not necessarily
a costly implementation. The other point that Betsy spoke to is the increase in
people seeking services. And that one is challenging because you do need to have
people power to do that. So on the smaller campuses, our campus in particular, we have two mental health counselors. However they are also each
our disability coordinators, as well as our wellness programmers. So although they have that ability, only a portion of their time is dedicated. So I would imagine at some
of the other small campuses, with the demand that is increasing, it does become taxing when
you have limited personnel. – I’ll just say, one of the tasks that we did in January when we reconvened the taskforce was to ask campuses what are the, you know, biggest successes you’ve had in following through
on the recommendations, and what are the ongoing challenges. And as you might expect, one of those ongoing
challenges is resources, personnel resources. And that, a lot has to do with the increased use of
services and programming, which as these two pointed out, is a real positive thing. And so I’m certain that campuses would be able to use resources to support
their ongoing activities. – Thank you for the question, Regent Tuss. I would be remiss to not speak to this, as I know all of my fellow
mental health colleagues across the state are
sort of counting on me to bring this message forward. And certainly, I know
Haver is a great example. As a place where I’ve collaborated closely with that campus, and they
do now have a licensed counselor on staff. And when you add treatment, and when you add screening, and when you add all these programs, again what we get are more
people coming in the door. And we have to have those resources to actually provide treatment. And I can speak to my campus, where I feel like we have had that support in continuing to have resources to address that need. But I know that’s something that’s a struggle on a lot of campuses. And part of that is
recognizing the complexity of treatment isn’t just one or two sessions. And one size doesn’t fit all for people. So someone might come in and they are you know, feeling better and have symptom reduction
in three to five sessions. For someone else, that takes a lot longer. And in a rural state like Montana, where some of the
resources are more limited, our college counseling centers are really the ones who are taking on more complex cases and really managing that increased demand in students who are presenting with suicidality. To your question about is it system wide, I would say the mental
health side of things, and I think this was true when we were part of the taskforce, it truly was system wide. At the MSU side, we went and visited all of the, at least I
can speak on the MSU side, all of the MSU campuses, and worked together to come
up with a plan for that. And the, at least the
mental health professionals, we really do communicate regularly through the Montana counseling association and provide support and collaboration. So it’s not uncommon for me to be in contact with
Mike Frost at the U of M and talk about here’s what I’m doing, what are you doing. Amber Spring up at Haver, working together on that. So from that side of things, I would say we have been
working really well together. – Thank you. I would simply say that if we, if we’ve been successful thus far, and the numbers indicate that more people are aware of this issue, and more referrals are
going to these centers, we need to take the next step in making sure that we
have whatever resources, from OCHE and from this board, and from the entire system to make sure that we’re
truly making a dent in this very significant problem. – [Regent Sheehy] Regent Albrecht. – Thank you Regent Tuss for stating that, because as I walk out the door, I couldn’t be more pleased to have this presentation. It is of such, it’s to me, one of the most important
presentations of the day because what you’ve just told us through your work, in changing a culture, which has opened up communication, which has de stigmatized and helped students to
encourage each other to get the help they need. To have it as regular conversation. You have saved lives. You’ve saved lives of our own children, who we’ve sent to school, and hoping that that
they’ll make good decisions, and that they’ll be safe. And we want our campuses to be those places of safety where they can get the help they need. Thank you for being that resource, and I would just follow up by saying and
challenging my colleagues here to continue to ask you what you need, and to support you, and to champion you in this effort. It is really the only way that we are going to make a dent in what we know is a
problem across our state. But it’s these kids in these places, in our institutions, who need that embrace. So thank you so much. – Thank you for your support in ensuring that our students
have safe and healthy learning environments to grow, and develop into the kind of people and citizens we ask them to be. So thank you. – Thank you, and thanks
for the whole taskforce for all of your work on this. Next is information item C, level one memorandum. This is Deputy Commissioner Tessman. – Madam Chair, thank you. And thanks to Christine, and
Betsy, and Carrie as well. I won’t apologize for
that extra time either. I mean for every minute we
spend on new programming on the academic side, and budgets and whatnot, we need a minute on this issue. It’s not going anywhere. It’s probably getting bigger. And what I’ll do is make up
for it by moving really quickly through this. And you, regents, have had the opportunity to look at our level one approvals, which are approvals
that have been delegated either to the Office of the Commissioner of Higher Education, or to the campuses themselves. These can be some more minor changes in terms of kind of
administrative organization within a program. Sometimes they involve
moratoria, or termination. The, if you can scroll down. Heather, if you can scroll down. The memorandum includes
information on each one of the proposals over the last four months. And I don’t need to go
through them item by item. I’d be happy to answer
any questions you have on any of those items. – Any questions for Deputy
Commissioner Tessman? None, okay. Next item, item D, the intent plan proposals. – Thank you Madam Chair. And somewhat similarly, I would say, this is here for your reference. This isn’t information item earlier when we were discussing
the level two proposals. I mentioned that those proposals are really one moment in a much longer, and quite rigorous process. And an earlier step in
that level two proposal, in the larger process rather, is the submission of intent to plan for various programs. And so you can see programs
that are simply moving forward in the planning process. And these programs will surface again as level two proposals most likely. It doesn’t mean that there’s
not more work to be done on each one of the proposals. But I’m happy to answer any questions on the proposals listed here, which address, I think, some of the more pressing
needs in the state. – Any questions? I’ll remind the regents
that these are available at any time so that we can review the status of the plans of all of the system units. Hearing no questions, the ARSA committee is adjourned. – Nice work. Thank you. We already completed public comment. And so at this point, we will recess the meeting and reconvene in the morning. I know the board will meet for breakfast with faculty representatives. And then the board will reconvene at 8:30 tomorrow morning. Thank you again for all of your kind words. Enjoy your evening.

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