NASA Women’s History Month Profile – Judy Grizzard (Armstrong Flight Research Center)

NASA Women’s History Month Profile – Judy Grizzard (Armstrong Flight Research Center)


[ Music ]>>This is Judy. My mentor, Charlie
Baker, was the Crew Chief on the X-15 program
and the Shuttle landing operations manager. He taught me how the
fundamentals of NASA works in the business sense and how
to think outside of a problem and be innovative
in our solutions. NASA throws a lot of
different projects at us. And each one is slightly
different than anything we’ve done before. And a key moment for me came
when I realized nobody knows how to do these things and
I was just as capable as the next person
to figure it out. That was an eye-opener
and a game-changer for me. I was able to really
trust my instincts and learn that I can do this. We sure should.>>We need about eight hours.>>My name is Judy Grizzard. I’m the contract manager for Kay
& Associates at NASA Armstrong. We maintain a wide range of
ground support equipment needed to support NASA’s
fleet of aircraft here at Edwards and at Palmdale. We’ve supported many,
many projects from Space Shuttle landings to LEAPTech program,
the Orion program. Juan, what battery
are you charging? What aircraft is this? We have multiple types
of aircraft here. SOFIA, the Gulfstreams, G-II,
G-III more commercial type, the F-18, F-15’s, let’s see,
the Global Hawks and the ER-2. So managing the type of
equipment we supply is a balance to make sure that we are
providing the equipment they need. Hey, Jimmy. The support we provided
for the Air Force, do you remember the hydraulic
mules that we used on that?>>104.>>It’s my role to
inspire our employees. What they do is important. As a support contractor, we’re here to help NASA
succeed, that’s our motto. We help NASA succeed,
as simple as that. And it really is that simple. This is the type of red
fluid units we used?>>Yes, ma’am.>>Okay. Some of our expertise
includes crane operations. Our personnel are
critical lift certified, and we’ve been involved
with many, many crane lifts
around the center. One important high-dollar crane
lift was the SOFIA mirror.>>Okay. Coming up. Go ahead and rope up. He’s roping up now [inaudible].>>Okay.>>Removing the mirror
from the cavity, we held our breath a little
bit because it’s one-of-a-kind and it was extremely bulky, removing it from a very small
space; but it went beautifully. In the local area, we have
a baseball team called the JetHawks. They have a beautiful stadium
in Lancaster, and NASA decided to support their local
community by providing an F-18 to be mounted on a
pedestal for display. Removing and then remounting
the F-18, it was a big job. My role was to plan
out the entire project. Find the right people,
assign the right jobs. We have to worry about
wind; we have to worry about the right lifting gear. We don’t want to
damage the plane. We don’t want to damage
JetHawk Stadium, the pedestal, and primarily we don’t want
to hurt any of our employees. And put it all together so
it goes smoothly and safely and everybody knows
their position. And it worked. It worked great. Coming to work every
day at NASA is amazing. And we get to see
amazing programs in science technology
come to fruition. It’s fun to be part of it.

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