SBA – NSBW – Smithsonian American History Event – Sunday May 1st, 2016

SBA – NSBW – Smithsonian American History Event – Sunday May 1st, 2016


Male:
Ladies and gentlemen, would you please stand for the national anthem sung by owner and
Five Star Guitars and the Oregon’s Small Business Person of the Year, Geoff Metts. Geoff:
(Song) Male:
Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome to the stage your master of ceremonies, SBA General
Counsel, Melvin Williams. Melvin:
Let’s hear it one more time for Geoff Metts in the National Anthem, please. I don’t know
about you, but I got little chills because we’re standing right in front of that very
sacred banner. If you haven’t had a chance to go back here and see the star-spangled
banner at some point, please. It is a part of our history that is significant. Good evening, everyone. Thank you for joining
us for our kick-off of National Small Business Week 2016. Thank you to those of you who are
not only in the room, but streaming online through sba.gov. We’re happy to have you with
us. As the voice of God said, I’m Melvin Williams, Jr., the general counsel at the SBA. I will
be your emcee for this evening. I’d like to welcome everyone to the Smithsonian
Institution’s National Museum of American History. I’d like to thank them for their
hospitality and opening up this beautiful space here on our nation’s capital. I hope
that prior to you sitting down, you had a chance to explore the American Enterprise
exhibit, and see a little bit about what small business can do for America, but I suspect
those of you in this room already know a little bit about that. Tonight, we have an amazing group of small
business owners in this room from each and every state in the country, in six territories.
I just want to take a moment, we’re going to be doing a lot of clapping tonight, so
let’s work our hands out. First of all, let’s give everyone a round of applause. I thank
all of you for being here tonight. Congratulations to all of you. Now, after our ceremonies tonight and tomorrow,
we’re going to take National Small Business Week on the road. SBA district offices in
each and every state are going to be hosting events. Our partners are going to be hosting
events. Our administrator, Maria Contreras-Sweet and our deputy administrator, Doug Kramer
are going to be on the road. They’re going to head out to New York City, Atlanta, Chicago,
Denver, Phoenix, San Jose and Oakland. In each city, we’ll salute our neighborhood
heroes and champions, small business owners. It’s you that are lifting up your communities
by creating jobs. It’s you who are transforming industries through innovation. You’re selling
goods and services to the federal government at a record pace. As small business owners,
you are more resilient in the face of adversity than at any other time in our history. The small business owners in this room and
the 28 million more across the country are the backbone of this economy. As you heard
our administrator say, you provide two out of three net new jobs in this economy. We’re
so excited to highlight your exemplary work not only tonight but throughout this week
through National Small Business Week. As a lawyer, I’ve got to get a few thank yous
and rules and regulations out of the way, and that includes thanking a few people. Before
we get started, let’s recognize our sponsors of National Small Business Week. First, we
could not have done this without SCORE. SCORE is a nonprofit association dedicated to helping
small businesses get off the ground, grow and achieve their goals through education
and mentorship. Thanks to their network of 11,000 plus volunteers, they’re able to deliver
their services at no or very low cost. Ken Yancey, are you here? Please stand. Rest
of SCORE, stand on up and be recognized. Stand up over here in the corner. Perfect. We want to recognize the other organizations
who are sponsors of National Small Business Week. Without their generous support, we would
not be able to make these events happen. Our presenting sponsor is Chase for Business.
You’ll be hearing a little bit about them later tonight. Our gold sponsor is ADP. You’ll
be hearing about them tomorrow. We are also working with Colonial Life, Square, Sam’s
Club, YP Marketing Solutions, and Intuit QuickBooks to present free educational webinars during
the week. Our bronze sponsors are Facebook, the National
Association of Government Guaranteed Lenders, Microsoft, ESET, Lockheed Martin, and VEDC.
We also have a list of over 35 nonprofit and trade groups that have joined us as sponsoring
cosponsors. At this time, can we have our sponsors please
stand and be recognized? Please stand. I also want to take a moment to recognize
the small businesses that have been helping SBA plan and execute tonight’s events. Obviously,
it’s SBA, we do a lot of talking, but we also do the walk. When we’re putting together tonight,
we wanted to make sure that we got small businesses involved. I’d like to give them a bit of a
shout out. The company live streaming tonight’s events is Suite Spot from New York City. Our
lighting and audio company that’s putting a glare on my bald spot here, thank you very
much, is Event EQ from Columbia, Maryland. Our event planners are Decibel Management
from Alexandria, Virginia. You’ve started some of your food but I imagine you’re going
to have a little bit more later, and I hope you enjoy it, and that’s coming from Well
Dunn Catering right here in Washington, D.C. All of them are small businesses. Let’s give
them a round of applause. Now to get things started, I’d like to introduce
our host for tonight, the chair and curator of the work and industry division of the Smithsonian
Institution’s National Museum of American History, Peter Liebhold. Peter’s curatorial
responsibilities include agriculture, manufacturing and mining. Throughout his professional life,
Peter has been involved with industrial history and the effort to preserve the working history
of the nation. In 1981, he helped open the Baltimore Museum
of Industry in a renovated canary building on that city’s historic waterfront. At the
Smithsonian since 1985, he has curated numerous exhibitions including American Enterprise,
the exhibit that you saw this evening. Please join me in welcoming Peter Liebhold. Peter:
Thank you everyone for coming here tonight. It’s really my honor to be with such an exciting
crowd of people. As the Smithsonian, we really try to represent all of America. I think this
room really is exactly what we’re trying to do in terms of tell your story. The small business is such an important part
of American history, and it’s one that I think that we constantly need to remind ourselves
of and tell the public. Having you here is truly an honor. I certainly want to thank
the SBA staff for doing such a wonderful job on putting this together, to Maria Contreras-Sweet,
the 24th administrator of the SBA who is doing a fantastic job in really pushing SBA forward
so that the organization can help you all achieve more. Especially, I want to thank
the prize winners and their guests. You guys are what it’s all about. You’re what’s making
it happen, and you’re the people that we want to collect. I want to take just a few minutes and talk
a little bit about our American Enterprise exhibition because it tells your story. American
Enterprise is our business exhibition. We think that for people to understand the United
States, to understand America, they have to know stories of business. Business is who
we are as a nation, and business is who we are as individuals. As Calvin Coolidge said infamously back in
1925, “The chief business of American people is business. They are profoundly concerned
with producing, buying, selling, investing, and prospering in the world.” My hat is off
to all of you who make Calvin Coolidge’s words come true everyday. I want you to understand
a little bit about what we say in American Enterprise in our exhibition to tell you story
that the exhibition has four major themes, and this is your story of opportunity, innovation,
competition, and common good that that’s mix that makes the nation so unique and you all
put it together. The exhibition shows how the United States
has been vibrant and a leading economy for over 150 years that we consistently do get
it right. What we say is that there is no one golden moment. I think this is so important
for everyone to understand. There’s not a point and we’ve ever figured it out. The United
States is based on no traditions, that as a nation we continue to change. The great economist, Joseph Schumpeter called
it Creative Destruction, but what we do is we continue to change, we continue to modify,
we come up with new ideas, and you all are the vanguards. Small businesses is the group
that lead with entrepreneurs, with inventors, and most importantly with risk-takers. For many years, historians have focused on
big. That was the old story. Alfred Chandler, The Visible Hand, looking at railroads, looking
at economy has failed, the rise of hierarchy, everything that you probably hate that that
was the old business history. The new business history starts to recognize that small is
what matters. In our American Enterprise exhibition, we tell a lot of these stories that in small
business, people take more risks. People are more flexible. People can respond to market
and make changes more quickly. Historically, small businesses are the incubators
of major change. Some small businesses stay small and provide products and services, and
that’s great. Some small firms get swallowed up by large firms, and that’s equally good
that you all are the testbed, the innovators who can take those risks, and bigger firms
can then make you wealthy and scale them up even more. Of course, small firms also become big firms.
The small firms grow very large at times. I think that the story of Phil and Dora both
of which are in our American Enterprise are great examples of this. Phil founded Blue
Ribbon Sports back in 1964 selling shoes out of the trunk of his car. In its first year,
he had $8,000 in sales and profits of $234, not really too impressive. Today, Phil Knight’s
company, Nike, they changed from Blue Ribbon Sports to Nike, has a bit over 30 billion
and employs 60,000 people nationwide. That’s a great story of small business going big. Dora Hilda Escobar, another small business
person left El Salvador in the 1980s, came to the United States seeking opportunity.
Entrepreneurial and hardworking, she labored actually in the underground community selling
clothes and making native foods. She saved her money, bought a used food truck and began
selling pupusas to the immigrate community. She was always extremely conservative a about
debt, worked on a cash basis, and expanded her offering. She now has three restaurants
and 175 employees. These are great stories of American success.
These are your stories. The Smithsonian continues to collect and tell the story of entrepreneurship
and how small business people contribute to the development of the United States. We look
forward to the day in the near future when artifacts that we can collect from you all
documenting your experiences can be on exhibit in our exhibitions. Thank you very much for
coming her tonight, and I salute you all. It’s an honor to be with such a distinguished
group. Thank you. Melvin:
Thank you, Peter, for your work and for hosting us tonight. Now, I’d like to welcome Janice
Bowdler from JP Morgan Chase. Janice is a managing director within global philanthropy
at Chase, a global leader in corporate philanthropy with $200 million invested in communities
annually. As senior program director, she is responsible for setting and driving the
firm’s philanthropic and corporate responsibility strategy in three key focus areas: financial
capability, community development, and small business development. Janice has also authored a number of publications
on financial opportunity and economic mobility. Prior to coming to Chase, Janice served as
the director of economic policy at the National Counsel of La Raza, the largest national Latino
civil rights advocacy organization in the country. We’d also like to thank Janice and
her team at Chase for their generous support of National Small Business Week as our presenting
sponsor. Please welcome, Janice Bowdler. Peter:
Thank you all so much. Isn’t this an amazing room? I have planned to tell you how beautiful
you all look, but I actually can’t really see you. I saw many of you out in the reception,
and you did in fact look beautiful. I’ll assume nothing much has changed in the intervening
moments. We are so excited to be the presenting sponsor
for National Small Business Week along with the SBA for the third year in a row. We’ll
be joining SBA events all across the country. It really is a week of weeks for us. We are
going to stand shoulder-to-shoulder with you all celebrating and helping business owners
get access to the tools and resources you all need to grow and thrive. Across the country, Chase serves more than
four million American businesses and employees, more than 10,000 specially trained bankers
who focus on serving them. Not really a numbers game, but we really think that our combination
of scale, our investment and technology and our professional relationship management is
a winning one. We are trying very hard to make it easy for business owners to control
their finances so you all can focus on running your businesses. In fact last fall, we launched a new brand,
Chase for Business, to help convey our mission to be the bank for businesses. We took a hard
look at ourselves, the fact that we have all the financial services that business owners
need like transaction accounts, cash management, lending, credit cards, payment processing,
but we knew that we could improve how those things work together. Our main focus is on making the parts of Chase
work better together for business owners. We feel pretty good about how we’re doing.
Our customers rank us number one and number two by J.D. Power and Associates. Of course,
I must also mention how proud we are to be among the top SBA lenders in the country every
year. If you’ll indulge me for just a moment, I
actually want to tell you a little bit about my day job because I think I actually have
one of the best day jobs around. I say that knowing the company I’m in. You all have amazing
jobs running your own businesses. As the head of small business initiatives for the JP Morgan
Chase Foundation, I’m a part of the small business forward initiative, a five-year,
$30 million commitment to connect small business owners with the mentors they need, help them
get access to markets, and help them better manage their money. That includes getting
access to flexible loans for those that aren’t able to quality for traditional bank loans. In fact, in just the last six months, we’ve
launched two such funds. The first is a $30 million fund, the National African-American
Loan Fund run by Valley Economic Development Center or VEDC. I know Roberto’s here. Roberto?
Over here in the corner, he’s hiding. Roberto, please stand up. We were so proud to stand
with Roberto to launch this fund, and even more excited about the success that it’s already
had. We know that African-American entrepreneurs have had a tough time getting access to capital. VEDC came to us and they said, “You know what?
We want to take a look at the root causes why and we want to build a fund that’s going
to help address those issues.” That’s exactly what they’ve done, launching in New York,
Los Angeles, and Chicago, the three largest cities for African-American small business
owners. Our work with them has helped to not only
shine a light on an important issue, but ensure that a community that’s still struggling deeply
after the recession has access to the kind of capital that they need to grow their small
businesses. Another example of work that we’ve done is
the Entrepreneurs of Color Fund launched by Develop Detroit Fund in Detroit, that wasn’t
really obvious, working with the small business owners in that city. One of the coolest things
about this fund is that they created a line of credit for local contractors. In the next few years, Detroit is going to
build a new light rail line. They are going to build a new arena, new hockey arena, and
they’re going to build a new international bridge. As you all know, the small business
owners, they need a little run room in order to be able to compete for those big contracts.
If they didn’t have access to some flexible capital that was going to allow them to bulk
up, make sure that all their licensing and bonding was in place, make sure that they
had all the equipment that they need, they weren’t going to be able to compete for those
jobs. For those of you that are small business owners
in the room, you know that lines of credit, one of the hardest things to get. If you’re
a new contractor, it can be extremely difficult for you to get that kind of capital. We knew
that that’s exactly what small business owners in the city of Detroit needed, and in particular,
the Entrepreneurs of Color, to make sure that they were going to be able to participate
in the economic growth of their city. Our partnerships with CDFIs and other technical
assistance providers are critical to extending the benefits and opportunity of small business
owners to more people and in particular, to women, business owners of color and veterans.
These entrepreneurs are all too often underserved but can and do contribute greatly to their
micro and macro economies. We see the need to create more inclusive growth
opportunities as a moral and a business imperative. Our work with small business owners is a perfect
example of that. We’ve seen time and time again that many of those entrepreneurs that
had a bump in the road or they had an issue with collateral, they got a loan through a
CDFI, very soon turnaround, grow that business and come back to borrow from a JP Morgan Chase. Over the next five years, JP Morgan Chase
will spend a billion dollars to strengthen workforce, improve the financial health of
individuals, revitalize neighborhoods and of course, grow small businesses. We look
forward to partnering with so many of you in this room on those goals. I want to congratulate tonight’s winners.
I do not want to stand in the way of your program. Thank you for indulging me as I share
a little bit of our work that we’ve done with small business owners, and I hope genuinely
that we get to work more with all of you. Thank you. Melvin:
Janice, thank you so much and the team at Chase for all that you do for the 28 million
small businesses across our country. We’ve been talking at you for a little bit, but
we’re going to take a break now. We’re going to get dinner served to you, and then I will
come back hopefully late in your meal and interrupt you, and we’ll do the rest of our
program. Male:
Please welcome back to the stage your masters of ceremony, SBA General Counsel Administrator,
Melvin Williams. Melvin:
Hello. Hello. How was dinner? How is dinner? Okay. Wonderful. Now look, I think I still
see some line in the back. Some of you who are not carrying your fair share on these
tables, so please make sure that you partake of that. Now that we are all well-fed, I would
really like to welcome a very special individual on to the stage, our SBA Administrator, Maria
Contreras-Sweet. Administrator Contreras-Sweet is a seasoned manager, corporate executive,
state cabinet official and entrepreneur. She joined President Obama’s cabinet in April
of 2014 when she was sworn in as SBA’s 24th administrator. SBA is the voice for entrepreneurship
in America. The agency supports US small businesses, create nearly two out of three net new jobs
in our economy, employ half of the nation’s private sector workforce. Our loans support more than $100 billion.
In California, our administrator was the longest-serving secretary for business, transportation and
housing. She led 44,000 employees, 14 departments and managed a $14 billion budget. She was
also California’s chief banking regulator. In the private sector, she served as vice
president of Westinghouse, 7 Up, RC Bottling Company, and eventually became an equity partner
there. As an entrepreneur, she started three businesses in Los Angeles, including a community
bank that specialize in small business lending. Shew as appointed by the US Senate to the
Glass Ceiling Commission to create more opportunities for women and minorities in Corporate America.
Today, she continues to advocate for diversity, access to capital, equal opportunity for all
Americans. It is my pleasure to introduce not only the
voice of small business on the president’s cabinet, but also the voice of small business
in America and our leader, Maria Contreras-Sweet. Administrator, please come forward. Administrator:
Thank you. Thank you very much. Thank you. Thank you. There must be some small businesses
in the house. All right. Here we go. I love this. Well, ladies and gentlemen, I’m here
to officially right now with the powers bestowed on me on behalf of President Obama to officially
kick off the National Small Business Week of 2016. Thank you so much. Thank you. Thank
you. I want to thank Peter for this lovely, gracious,
incredible venue for our small businesses to observe their role in American history.
Entrepreneurs are the very essence of Americana. I also want to thank Janice for picking up
the check for dinner. Thank you so much to JP Morgan Chase. Thank you so much for your
role in all of this. Let me just say to each of you in this room,
each of you is one of the most inspiring small business success stories that we have to offer.
You are our state winners. Congratulations to each of you. Thank you so much. I can’t
believe it. We are so fortunate to be joined by entrepreneurs,
by mom and pops, by manufacturers, by hackers, disruptors, innovators who have availed themselves
of SBA services to create jobs, to deliver goods and services and to lift up America
across the country in local communities one job at a time. Thank you so much for being
here. My mother taught me manners. When you have
a guest in the house, you do have to introduce them. My name is Maria Contreras-Sweet, and
it is my husband who always says that he made me sweet, Mr. Ray Sweet. Thank you, Ray. Thank
you. It is
very rare that I have the family fully in
town, and so I’m delighted that my daughter flew in from Los Angeles, and my son is here
with us too, Francesca and Antonio. Thank you for being here. Thank you. Thank you.
Thank you. I want to talk about the entrepreneurs whose
blood, sweat and tears, whose pursuit, whose passion, whose triumphant nature, whose courage,
whose honor, all of the characteristics that are so emblematic of you here in this room,
you have become the most valuable commodity in our country. You truly do represent the
very essence of what is American free enterprise. I’m talking about the men and women, the innovators
and the persistence that is the envy of the world. I had the good fortune of just traveling
recently with President Obama to the historic trip to Cuba. I want to share with you what
it was like there to talk about entrepreneurs and to talk to them. As we were talking about
the services that SBA had, they just reveled with admiration. Then from there, the president
told them I was going to be going with him, and then he went to Argentina and said I’d
be coming right behind him. We came two weeks later. I had to send him a little note and
say, “You make a great advance man.” That’s what I realized. What he’s really been committed to is to lifting
up what he believes as the most powerful force the world has ever know, to lift people out
of poverty, to create transformation in neighborhoods and in communities and in countries, and that
is entrepreneurship. I hope that you have noticed how he has led
us by supporting maker fairs at the White House, by supporting and encouraging his daughters
to shop small every time we celebrate this week. He issued a proclamation here for this
very week. He is now convening global ministerials and summits around the world. I had the good
fortune of representing him in Morocco, and then we went to Kenya together. It’s just such an honor to see how committed
he is, and he always, always make sure that he meets with entrepreneurs and small businesses
in every country. He says, “I want to address civil society, bring out the entrepreneurs
in the mom and pops that produce things in these countries.” It’s just incredibly joyful
to see him in action at that point. If you’ll just indulge me, I just want to
just for everybody to see the power that’s in this room. Raise your hand if your parents
or your grandparents turned an idea into a small business. Nice. Keep them up. Raise
your hand if you yourself turned an idea into a small business. Raise your hand if one day
it is your hope to create a small business. There you go. It’s the past, the present,
and the future of American economy. Thank you for that. Thank you. Thank you for that. The theme of this year’s National Small Business
is Dream Big, Start Small. That’s more than a tagline to us at SBA, it’s the American
story. It’s the homesteaders who set out west in the 1860s to cover life out of the land
for themselves and for their families. It’s the wartime wives and Rosie the Riveters of
World War II who turned their patriotism into profitable businesses. It’s the determination of inclusive communities
like African-Americans who overcame discrimination to pioneer advancements in agricultural chemistry,
biosciences, agriculture, performance that some performed surgeries, some helped us create
the first home office computer. All of you, those stories, no one’s entrepreneurial story
or journey is exactly the same, but the common thread between all of you and us is that you
all started right here with a big, big dream, and you took that first step. Entrepreneurship allows us to provide something
a value to society or also creating a better future for ourselves, for our children and
theirs, and for the people that we love. Local small business sponsor little league teams.
They donate profits to the local PTA. They plant trees along main street, invested in
the future of their neighborhoods and bring people together in all the communities that
we call home. Today our small businesses comprise the biggest
engine of our economy. You can find them on main street, in our malls, and we know that,
you’ve heard us say it over and over that they’re creating a majority of the jobs. It
is a pleasure to be a cabinet when the president and the Department of Labor secretary announces
that we’ve had 73 months of consecutive job growth which is a record in American history. I get to say, “But Mr. President, the majority
of those jobs were created by small businesses.” It’s true, it’s true. In fact, for those of
you that heard two years ago, we hosted Janet Yellen here, tomorrow we’re going to have
Mark Cuban. Janet Yellen was here with us a couple of years ago, and she reiterated
and made the point that it was small businesses that powered our recovery after the great
recession. Truly, truly, truly, we celebrate these contributions
and their importance to all of us. SBA often works behind the scenes to help guarantee
a support of ecosystem for business growth and development. For more than 60 years, we’ve
helped some of the most important companies grow from small to big. In fact just last
night, I was having dinner with a handsome young gentleman, sorry husband, and he came
over and he was very eager to connect and talk and he said, “My name is Kevin.” He says,
“I looked high and low. No one believed that I could put technology and clothing. No one
believed in my idea, and it wasn’t until the SBA stepped forward to offer me a guarantee
that I received here in the state of Maryland a little small loan of $150,000 to start a
company that I’ve now founded and grown and it’s called Under Armour.” Isn’t that great?
It’s so great. I loved when I saw the Mars rover Curiosity
and to know that from our program, we had six SBIR recipients from the SBA office that
helped create that Mars rover Curiosity. I’m so proud that we’ve helped to start Apple
and Qualcomm and FedEx and Chobani’s and Ben & Jerry’s and the iRobot and Oral-B Toothbrushes.
Every state that I go to, it’s such a joy to go in and to visit a small business that’s
now maturing and maturing, and that’s our great joy is to see you become large, to scale
and to grow. We put our thumb on the scale for ordinary
citizens who start their enterprises. Some people have a wealthy uncle. We have Uncle
Sam. When I took over the leadership of the SBA, I said I wanted the letters of SBA to
mean something different, something more profound. I reframed the dialog to call us Smart Bold
and Accessible. I said I wanted it to be more than a tagline, I wanted it to be a new governing
agenda. I wanted to make certain that we were harnessing the smart systems that are available
to us, to make us as efficient and effective and optimized as possible. I hope you have felt that sense if you go
to our site, and you now can go to Linc. We’re not creative on names. I didn’t say we were
creative. The name of our program is called Linc. If you go to that now, you answer 20
simple questions, and it’s a little bit like match.com. Have you ever used that? No, don’t
tell me. That’s all right. Don’t tell me. Keep it to yourself. Anyway, it’s very much
like match.com and you go in, and we reroute your profile to those who have an interest
in meeting you in a date, but this date is with a banker. As a result of this new technology that we
put in place, we’ve had 30,000 new matches just in a few months that that technology
has been up. We have SBA, one because one of the things that you all told us was that
our applications weren’t too easy to get through, and as a banker, I can tell you they weren’t.
I was delighted that we were able to work with our IT team and create new efficiencies
so that now we’re going to begin in the next 60, 90, 120 days to take every bank that’s
an SBA lending partner and put them all on this new system so that now they will all
be online. You don’t have to fill out the paper and fax them. It’s really going to be
spectacular and I think revolutionized the way in which we engage in this program. There are so many more smart systems that
we’ve put in place. I can’t tell you how proud I am of the team, our entire operations, our
HR group, our digital services officers, and the entire team that have been working on
all of this work. What does that mean? What did that do? I can tell you that as a result
of that, SBA this year is at record lending levels. In fact, it was that trip to Kenya
when … Thank you. Thank you. It was that very trip to Kenya when I received
a call from our NAGGL, the National Association of Government Guaranteed Lenders, and they
said, “You’re about to reach your cap,” the congressional authorized lending levels. Ann
Marie, the head of our office and I talked and I said, “What are the options?” She says,
“We stop lending, we cut people’s levels down or we ask for more.” We said, “We’re going
to ask for more.” We went back and you can imagine that call
from Kenya to my ranking member and the chairman of the house and senate committees when I
said, “I need for you to pass a bill in about two weeks so that we can keep the lending
going.” Just as you are amused by that call, I can tell you they were equally amused. I
have to tell you, when I shared with them how compelling your stories are and the role
that you’re playing across the country, they knew it was the right thing to do. I got to sit at cabinet when I hear from the
Secretary of Transportation and he said it took two and a half, three, four years to
get his authorizations through. I hear that from Department of Defense and the Small Business
Administration was able to get our funding bill increased in a matter of two weeks, and
we returned from Kenya. We had $4.5 billion more to put out for the remainder of the year.
It was a remarkable achievement. I’m really proud of that. When I arrived, they said that we had not
reached our contracting levels. For those of you that get contracts with the federal
government for about six years, and we just hunkered down, focused on this. I don’t know
how many times John Shoraka … John, are you in the house? First of all, Ann Marie
for breaking that record on capital. Ann Marie? Where are you, Ann? There you are. There’s
Ann Marie. She took down the house on lending. Thank you, Ann Marie. Thank you. Then our office of capital access, now John,
where are you? There’s John. Okay, good. There’s John. Let me just say. We talked about the
office of capital access, but just so that you know, this is a team that has to have
the chutzpah, the ganas, the passion, the commitment, whatever language you want to
assign to it, but they have to have sharp elbows because they’re up against the Department
of Defense generals, Department of Energy physicists, and they have to say, “No, that
opportunity goes to a small business,” and sometimes we have to duke it out and we do,
and we prevail. We didn’t meet the 23%. We exceeded it and we got to 25.75% of the procurement
spend to small businesses this year. John Shoraka, thank you. Thank you. It’s just incredible what this team is doing.
You might say, “Well, those are all good numbers. What about the below the line? I’m a banker
and I also like the below the line metrics. For the ladies in the house, we saw that we
had never even gotten close to the small business goal for contracting with women. We hunkered
down and focused on that too, and we put in some new tools. We went to congress and fought,
fought fiercely to get sole source authority, the kind of authority that we have in other
categories, but we had not had that for women, and we fought to mobilize across the country
and all of our resource partners waited, and everybody came forward, and we’re able to
achieve that. Now, they’re buying offices across the country,
they see a woman who is uniquely qualified to do a body of work, can just sole source
them and bring them without putting them to an arduous process. Really proud of that achievement.
We’re expanding the categories in which women are underserved. Thank you. Thank you. There’s just so much good stuff going on.
I’m going to tell you, this is the best SBA team ever assembled, I believe. I truly do
believe that. I truly do. You know we hit the 5% goal for women this
year, and now we say it’s just the floor upon which we will build, ladies and gentlemen.
Also, our lending numbers you can imagine, I said we’re also about accessible, and I
wanted to make certain we’re accessible to everybody. We have put on programs that you
have never seen before. We have set for the person who took a left turn when they should
have gone right, and they ended up incarcerate, but they served their time, paid their debt
to society, and now can’t get a job to feed themselves or their family. We said, “That’s just not right in America.
We believe in a second chance.” We did something that’s very exceptional in my view, and that
is our microlending team office came to me and said, “Let’s join the Ban-the-Box movement
which means that when you fill out an application now in one of our nonprofit microlenders,
we now no longer ask you if you’ve been incarcerated. Now, you can come in and qualify for a loan
that is re-entrepreneurship, re-entrepreneurship. Also, for the deaf and hard-hearing, do you
know that their unemployment rate is above 40%? We just said, “We need to address this.”
We are the first department in the federal government to put in video-relay services
to make sure that they are able now to start businesses to serve their communities. It
was the first again for the federal government. So proud and thank you to my son for giving
us that great idea from the SCC. Thank you. Thank you. I mean, I could go on and on. I can’t tell
you how proud we are. We know that there are women who serve our country as well. Sometimes
they weren’t as comfortable in the regular Boots to Business Program. You all know the
Boots to Business Program. We are in every military installation around the world where
we help our men and women in uniform, and we help them transition out. If they don’t
have a job in mind, we can talk to them about entrepreneurship. I want to thank Barb Carson. Barb, are you
somewhere in the house? There she is in orange. Thank you for putting on this program. Thank
you, Barb. We said, “But what about those that have already been out for some time that
trying to figure out their way forward?” We launched last year a program called Reboot.
That was pretty good, Barb. That was a good game. Now, we are also standing up in our
veteran business outreach centers these wonderful programs to make sure that we’re connecting
with our veterans who served our country so valiantly that we think that’s the least that
we can do for them. We have a special loan program for them, and
we give them an awful lot of more fee reductions because we think they deserve it. Thank you,
Barb, and to all of the men and women who had served our country, who are here in the
room. Thank you. Thank you. All these metrics have really been phenomenal.
Then we have the SBICs that are the fund of funds. We are the largest fund of funds in
the world. We are so proud of the fund managers who come in to address mezzanine, early stage,
private equity, all these very interesting types of financing. They are top exports,
and we leverage their capacity. If they come in and say they have a fund of
$50 million and we see phenomenal success that they have ability to provide early stage
capital to nascent entrepreneurs and help them grow, we match them to the one. A $50
million fund becomes $150 million to make sure that small businesses like yours are
getting the funding and the capital that they need. To all of the SBIC funds in here, congratulations
to you for being qualified for that program. Thank you. Mark Walsh, are you in the house? Mark wins
that program. Thank you, Mark. Thank you so much. Thank you. I mentioned that we’re about
the bold as well, and the bold refers to our global strategy. We think that today’s entrepreneurs
know no borders. We know that when you start up now you say, “I want to do business in
Canada. How do I get business in the Netherlands?” We are taking down the borders to say, “How
do we connect people here with there?” As we heard the congress and the White House
were working on a trade agreement, we said, “If there’s going to be a trade agreement,
we’re going to make sure that for the first time in history, never happened before in
the world, there is going to be an SME chapter in that that empowers the small business to
connect with their strategic allies, small businesses around the world,” and we were
successful. Now we just need to get the bill passed. At least now, we’re going around the world
talking to people that there should never ever be another trade agreement without a
chapter addressing how the small, medium community is going to benefit from it. That’s great. Eileen, thank you for leading that effort.
Eileen Sanchez who runs our office of international affairs. Thank you. Thank you. We’re convening
global ministerials and calling on heads of state from all around the world asking other
heads of state to elevate entrepreneurship and create cabinet offices. We are on the
road all over the world, and we just landed last night from Argentina. That was quite
a trip. Anyway, we’ve been doing important work to
make certain that you as you navigate through the world that you are navigating safely and
see if you haven’t looked into the trade export loans, I don’t know how many of you have gotten
a 50%, 65% or 75% loan. These are 90% guarantee loans. Phenomenal program that we have there
in that office. Anyway, then you know obviously how important
all of this comes together through our counseling operations. I don’t know if Tameka Montgomery
is in the house. Tameka Montgomery, thank you so much. Our SBDCs, our women business
centers, our SCORE offices, our veteran business outreach centers, all the phenomenal programs
that somehow it becomes the largest counseling network in the world, and Tameka Montgomery
runs that incredible operation. Thank you for that. Thank you. Anyway, you could just tell how … I didn’t
mention Erin Andrew. Is she in the room? Our women’s office. Erin, thank you so much. Thank
you. Let me tell you what Erin did. We were saying we needed more women to disrupt, we
needed more women to innovate, we needed more women to get in the game. When we go to Silicon
Valley and we’re meeting with so many entrepreneurs there, it’s largely male. I love men, don’t
worry. I have to tell you that we decided to create
two programs what is called ChallengeHER with the last three letters HER, and the other
is InnovateHER, HER at the end. Both of these, one is for contracting and the other one is
for innovation programs. Erin has been lifting those up throughout the entire part of the
country. It’s not just Silicon Valley and the East Coast. Thank you, Erin, again for
that work with our women in operations. Anyway, you can just see how proud I am of
this incredible team, and I want you to know them because these are the men and women that
are facilitating the programs of which were all partaking. Thank you so much for allowing
me that very bit of bragging rights in terms of the team that we have. Let me just say that it takes an entire orchestra.
Of course, to our finance team, our human resources, our operations, our legal team,
everybody, it just takes an incredible operation. The front lines that you’ve all gotten to
know first and foremost and that is our field operations. We love our field operations,
and they truly are our face out in the field. I know we have one regional administrator
here, Natalia, who represents this part of this country. Natalia, please stand up. Natalia
Urtecho, thank you. I don’t know, let me just see, is Chris James who runs our field operations
in the house? He didn’t make it. Eugene, any of our field folks? They’re out in the field.
There you go. That makes a lot of sense. What they did do so that you know is we just
talked to so many of you. I get the privilege of meeting each of you as I travel across
the country. One of the things that you said is it’s so hard to get permitting, it’s so
hard to start your business, it’s hard to get the licences that you need. We just had
said even though we’re the federal government, we can play a role in the local government.
We went to the president and he agreed, and we launched a new program called Startup in
a Day. Our field operations has now been challenging
mayor after mayor. I started in Boston and have worked all the way to San Francisco and
down to Los Angeles. We now have close to 100 of the largest cities’ mayors committed
to helping you start your business in a day. I love that the president is bragging about
this program because it’s taking hold very popular. While we were in Argentina, we were
bragging about this. I have to tell you that the mayor of Buenos Aires said, “Well, why
don’t I sign it?” I said, “Well, you’re not part of our national league of cities.” He
says, “Well, I want you to tell them in America that we’re committed to the same.” He signed
it too. It’s really spectacular. Thank you. You can just see how much fun we’re having
growing small businesses and growing jobs and growing our economy. I love that we’re
adapting, we’re leveraging networks. Last night, another gentleman I was chatting with
for quite some time was Travis who founded Uber. I know you all have different opinions
about Uber, but nonetheless, I was bragging to him. I said, “You think your platform is
pretty cool. Let me just say, we do not have any banks, yet we have written the largest
lending portfolios. We personally aren’t counselors, but we have the largest counseling network
in the world. We don’t actually run a fund, but we manage the largest fund of funds in
the world.” I’d say, the fact that we’re running these
programs, the lending and the investment portfolio, this is the dessert. We are running this program
at zero subsidy to taxpayer dollars. Is that phenomenal? Congratulations again to the team
for all of these. Anyway, let me just close with a couple of
my favorite quotes, and one of them is from John F. Kennedy who said, “We don’t all have
equal talent, but in America, we should be given an opportunity, an equal opportunity
to pursue our talent.” That is what I think the very essence of what SBA is, and why I’m
so proud of what we do each and every day. I’m so proud of that. My second favorite quote is Dr. Martin Luther
King who said, “What good is it to be able to sit at an integrated counter if you can’t
afford to buy the hamburger?” He understood that as we fought for civil rights that we
needed to make sure that we brought along our market rights and economic empowerment,
inclusive entrepreneurship. If the good doctor were here, we would say, “At SBA, we don’t
want to help you buy the hamburger. We’re here to help you buy the restaurant. We believe
in ownership, leaving legacies to our family. That’s what the SBA does each and every day.”
Thank you for being the joy of our life to give us the privilege to get to meet you,
to understand the blood, sweat and tears that you fought to build your families’ businesses
and all that you’re doing. Having started three businesses and my third
you heard was the community bank, consider myself a small business woman whose small
business serves small businesses everyday. I salute each and every one of you, and thank
you for making our country a great place. God bless you, and God bless the United States
of America. Thank you so much. Thank you so much. Thank you. Thank you so much. Thank
you. Thank you so much. Thank you so much. Thank you. We’re proud of you. We love you.
We love you. Thank you. Thank you. Melvin:
Our administrator, our leader in small business, leading 28 million small business, Administrator
Maria Contreras-Sweet. Please, one more round of applause. Now you know why we’re so fired
up. Again, Administrator, thank you for your remarks. Powerful, especially the last part
about the lunch counter when we’re sitting in this building and the lunch counter that
was desegregated in 1956 in North Carolina. It’s just over here, just to side of us. Again,
powerful and timely, and when the restaurant is bought, we’ll put that lunch counter back
in it. Now to our awards. First, we will honor SBA’s
resource partner organizations. These organizations offer counseling and training services across
the country to aspiring and established business owners. First, the Small Business Development
Center of the Year goes to the Charleston Area Small Business Development Center. Tom
Lauria, director of the center will be accepting the award. Our National SCORE Chapter of the Year Award
goes to the Canton, Ohio Chapter. Accepting the award on behalf of the chapter is Ed Messerly,
chapter chair. The Veterans Business Outreach Center of the
Year Award goes to the New Mexico Veterans Business Outreach Center. Here to accept the
award is Director Joe Long. The Women’s Business Center of the Year Award goes to North Dakota Center
for Technology and Business. Accepting the award on behalf of the center are Debra Eslinger,
program director, Deidre Hillman, program coordinator, Joanna Krizan, financial coordinator,
and Laurie Morse-Dell, marketing coordinator. Now for the Jody Raskin Award. This award
goes to an outstanding opportunity lender and is named and honor of our departed colleague
and former program head, Jody Raskin. Our winner this year is Luis E. Mora-Rechnitz
from Finanta. This year, we are honoring not one but two
small business investment companies. In 1958, congress created the small business investment
company program to facilitate the flow of long-term capital to America small businesses.
SBA partners with private investors to capitalize professionally managed investment funds known
as SBICs that finance small business. You’ve heard of some of the success stories from
our administrator just moments ago. Our first SBIC of the Year is Argentum Capital
Partners. Accepting on behalf of Argentum are Walter Barandiaran, Daniel Raynor, managing
partners and Steve Berman, partner and chief financial officer. Our second SBIC of the Year is GMB Mezzanine
Capital. Accepting on behalf of GMB are Carleton Olmanson, managing principal and Michael D.
McHugh and Daniel Hemiadan, managing partners. Finally, we move to our Phoenix Awards for
Disaster Recovery. First, we will honor outstanding contributions for disaster recovery by a volunteer.
The trail of two tornadoes that plowed through Moore, Oklahoma within two years created a
new career path for our winner. He was working as a filmmaker and wedding photographer in
May 2013 when a devastating tornado struck Moore. The storm destroyed the entire city
blocks, left damage of two building in its wake and killed 24 people. The next morning, our honorary gathered a
group of 10 volunteers to help with the massive cleanup task. He assumed the leadership role
and city officials took notice. He organized a meeting and twitted a request for more volunteers
using the #ServeMoore. The next day, more than 3,000 people showed up bringing with
them brooms, rakes, shovels and bags to hall away the debris. Within days, a group of volunteers that swell
to more than 10,000 individuals. Our honorary managed the recovery logistics. When city
leaders established the Serve Moore Community Renewal Center, they asked him to become its
executive director. He established a protocol which included emergency preparedness for
future disasters while recruiting and training volunteers ready to quickly respond to the
next crisis. That crisis came in March 2015 when a smaller
tornado struck Moore. Serve Moore instantly mobilize a cleanup debris and get needed supplies
and resources to those in need and also served as a hub where residence and businesses received
recovery assistance. Under his leadership, Serve Moore has activated nearly 55,000 volunteers
who have met more than 4,000 repair and construction-related needs for the residence affected by recent
disasters. Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome, Chris
Fox of Moore, Oklahoma. Next, we will honor outstanding contributions
to disaster recovery by a public official. Just over two years ago on April 28th 2014,
Louisville, Mississippi was hit by a massive tornado. Packing winds of over 170 miles an
hour, the storm ripped the path of destruction. It was a mile wide and 32 miles long. The
tornado left in its wake total destruction of the only hospital in the city. More than
200 homes and businesses were destroyed or heavily damaged and 10 people were killed. Our honorary who happens to be the mayor of
Louisville and the residents were looking forward to the creation of 200 new jobs after
the city signed a contract with Winston Plywood & Veneer, a manufacturer of specialty plywood
products that was going to take over a former Georgia Pacific Plant. A tornado destroyed
the plant, creating an additional economic blow to the city of 6600 residents. After overseeing the search and rescue efforts
of local first responders and checking on the safety of the disaster survivors, our
honorary established a dedicated phone line for residents to report and give updates on
the missing. The owner of a local radio station, our honorary and his staff worked tirelessly
to get operations restored to provide the city much needed information on where to go
for disaster recovery assistance. Tonight’s awardee then turned his attention
to focus on the long-term economic recovery of the city. He reached out to the parties
involved in the Winston Plywood & Veneer deal, its included investors, along with state and
federal officials to encourage them to renew their commitment to build a plant in Louisville. On January 30th 2015, our winner welcomed
officials from Winston Plywood & Veneer for a groundbreaking ceremony of the Louisville
site of the new state-of-the-art plywood mill. The project represents an investment … It’s
worth an applause. You can applaud for that. Like they say on the infomercials, “Wait,
there is more.” The project represents an investment of $50
million and will create 400 new jobs, twice the amount of the previous plant. Now I know
when we think of Louisville sluggers, we usually think of a state to the north. Ladies and
gentlemen, I think we happen to be graced in our own presence here with our very own
Louisville slugger. Please welcome the mayor of Louisville, Mississippi, William Hill. William:
As a public official being asked if you would like to speak, should I say more? Actually,
I was told I didn’t have a choice to things. I thought I might get away with that, but
I would first like to thank the SBA for this distinct honor and award. I’d like to congratulate
all of the award winners this evening. Small businesses are truly the heartbeat of
America. I’m delighted just to be a part of this program. As you can tell from my accent,
I’m not of the Northern Louisville, I’m from Louisville, Mississippi. Also, I would like
to congratulate you on behalf of being also a small business owner myself whom I delighted
to have with me my wife and my children who have as what’s mentioned a radio station,
and we’re small business owners. Although you may thought if I said small business
and you took notice of the wine you are drinking, it says “William Hill” that is not me. It
is an honor to accept this award, and I would tell you that in any disaster as a public
official, there are no plans that you can make. You can only be prepared the best you
can. There’s not a playbook for this, and there
are many public officials elected or employed across this country who deserves such an award
for leading. Not being able to plan for it, all that it is is a matter of reacting. You
react to the best of your ability and you look towards the future, and you look at what
opportunities you may have. Thankfully, we have a community that was resilient
and decided that we as a community would come back and would come back to the best of our
ability. There was so much lost. There was lives lost as in a lot of disasters. There
were belongings, there were memories, and there was employment lost. The main thing
that we could do or anyone can do as a leader, whether it be elected, employed or just in
your household is give hope. That’s all that we tried to do as leaders in our community
was to give hope, and we’re delighted to have done that. I dedicate this award to my community, Louisville,
Mississippi, Winston County and Mississippi and the federal government. Whereas the government
sometimes gets a bad rep, but in this case, this was a true example of synergy of government.
The federal government, the state government, the local government and the people who elect
the government, working together to try to make our community come back. For that, I dedicate this award to the people
of my community, the people of my state, the people of this great country, and … Thank
you, and I dedicate it to a company who could have easily walked by a business decision
being that insurance money could have meant way more, but rather than taking insurance
and walking away having faith in us as a community. They doubled down with money. We’ve doubled
down with jobs, and it gave hope to our community. Whereas now we have nearly a $50 million plus
industry and a 50 million plus healthcare facility being built in rural Mississippi.
Thank you and God bless you. Melvin:
There’s been a great offense committed, and I am the perpetrator. I want to apologize
to Chris Fox of Moore, Oklahoma. He should be at this podium to give a couple of remarks.
I whisked him off. I apologize for that, Chris. If you could come back and join us and give
us a couple of remarks, please. Chris:
Thank you. No worries at all. Thanks for the opportunity. I do want to say thank you very
much. Thank you for the award. It’s such an honor. In Oklahoma, we often prepare for disaster
by saying it’s not if, but when. That inevitability motivates us toward preparedness and preparedness
leads us to recovery. We recover from what has happened again so that we can stand ready
for what will happen in the future. I believe that the human race has found the
key ingredient in successful disaster recovery, and its togetherness. I’m so grateful for
the partnerships of tens of thousands of volunteers who walked alongside our community and recovery,
and for the partnership of the Small Business Association among many others. I’m often inspired by the words of Helen Keller.
She said, “Alone we can do so little, together we can do so much.” I thank you for this award
and my neighbors in Moore, thank you for your unwavering support. Melvin:
Up next, we have a short video for our final awardee of the night, and then we will return
to give that award. Please play the video. James:
SBA’s low interest disaster loans make individuals, nonprofit organizations and businesses of
all sizes whole being. Within the past five years alone, SBA’s approved more than 100,000
disaster loans for a total of $5.2 billion. A huge chunk of these loans, about a third
of them were made after hurricane Sandy in 2012 like the one made at this year’s Phoenix
Award winner. Female:
Since 1998, the SBA has presented the Phoenix Award to business owners and individuals who
displayed courage, resourcefulness and tenacity in the aftermath of a disaster while contributing
to the rebuilding of their community. James:
This year’s Phoenix Award winner for Outstanding Small Business Disaster Recovery has survived
not one, but two horrible disasters. Like the Phoenix arises from the ashes, Majestic
came back stronger with an unwavering desire to serve their own community. Steven:
My name is Steven Piazza from Majestic Vending and Services, Inc. Maryann:
My name is Maryann Piazza. I am the co-owner, co-founder and the CEO of Majestic Vending
and Services, Inc. Steven:
We’re a full-service vending company that supplies offices, businesses and local homes. Maryann:
My husband and I are a team an we each have our strengths and weaknesses. Steven:
I’m here because of the SBA. First dealings with the SBA was the loan I got to buy this
building. Majestic was started with a $50 bubble gum machine that I bought from a friend
of mine. Maryann:
We were able within a few short years to go for now servicing the New York City Metropolitan
area, and we’ve been able to grow 250%. Hurricane Sandy to Majestic was devastating. We had
suffered severe damage not only in our building, but outside of our building because our equipment
was at our customers, and we had to think about how we were going to rebuild. George:
They were affected by it but still they kept going down to the beach and helping in any
way they could. Maryann:
We knew that there had to be people that needed water, and if they couldn’t get to us, we
would bring it to them. We’re the type of people where we don’t take no for an answer.
We never backed down from a challenge, and in this particular case, this was just something
that we wanted to be a part of because this is who we are. It was just a natural occurrence
for us to continue to serve our community. We were able to right grants, we were able
to help those that were in need, those that were unfamiliar with where they can get help. Ed:
SBA has helped Maryann many times, originally, to buy the building that she occupies. Maryann:
Two years later, they helped us further by getting a capital loan after the 9/11. After
hurricane Sandy, the SBA provided funding and secured financing for us in order for
Majestic to get back on our feet and to move forward. Ed:
She reached out to the SBA, and was the recipient of a disaster loan. Steven:
This is Tompkinsville Staten Island. It’s a great place. Ed:
It is a small community with a huge reach. Everyone ships in is all hands on deck and
we found our place in the community. Steven:
I not only work here, I consider myself a part of this community. The feeling that I
got when I walked in here that day, see everything that I worked for, see the back of my building
collapsed, and to say, “What would you do?” I don’t quit. I don’t stop. I think that surprised
me the most. I didn’t only think about myself, but about my family, and I thought about my
community. I said, “How am I going to do this?” More importantly, I knew I was going to do
it. Melvin:
Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome our 2016 Phoenix Award winner for Outstanding Small
Business Disaster Recovery, Maryann and Steven Piazza, owners of Majestic Vending and Services
from Staten Island, New York. Maryann:
What could we say? When we started out as a small business in 1994 as a simple DBA,
we turned to look to see what could we do to just put food on the table and to raise
a family. Who thought that here it is our 20th year in business that we would be here
mainly because of the SBA. It is true that when we started our business, we started in
our house. We were six people living in a six-room house, and in our garage was 150
square feet. We needed to move our business south, and we wrote a business plan, and we
were very grateful to do that. Who is going to listen to us but the SBA did,
and they gave 100% financing, and we were able to purchase that building that we now
have today. Through that process, we grew. In 1999, we’re able after three years of being
in business to move in. Once again after we continued to grow, in 2001, that faithful
day, we were once again impacted. A lot of our businesses although that we were only
a short distance away from Manhattan, we needed capital improvement loans and we needed to
expand. Once again, the SBA came up and they allowed
us to get that funding. Then we went through the next couple of years, and then once again,
unfortunately, we were struck by hurricane Sandy. Hurricane Sandy came like no one could
possible imagine. We realized that what we’re going to do. All through those years of being
raised up in the community with the SBA as our business financier and their strategic
partners as a small business development center, we were able to become more aware of what
they had to offer. It is through the SBA that we are here today.
We’re just encouraged and very humbled by this whole experience because we didn’t know
anybody was watching. Yet in the end, we are very happy to be here tonight. Thank you so
much. Steven:
Thank you. Thank you. Melvin:
Okay. Just a couple of housekeeping matters. If you have a name tag, you will need it for
tomorrow, so don’t lose those name tags. Keep them with you. They are your ticket for the
other event tomorrow which is going to be outstanding. This is just the beginning. National
Small Business Week is officially kicked off. Please follow us through all the events. Continue
to follow us on our website through Twitter, through Facebook. Enjoy, track the administrator
and the deputy administrator as they go the highways and byways of this country next week. We want to thank you for joining us. Those
of you here in the room and on the webcam, the webcast, thank you for joining us. All
of our kids, it’s time to go to sleep. That means you too, Anderson. Thank you and good
night. Thank you for joining us.

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