Sexual Health Lecture

Sexual Health Lecture


[ Music ]>>Good afternoon. Thank you all for coming. My name is Jo Buczko
and I’m the coordinator for Student Health Services. Can you hear me? Yes. OK. All right, thank you. How many of you know that you
have a Student Health Services here on campus? OK. All right. So, some of you are going to
go home better informed today. Student Health Services’
mission statement is to provide quality health and
education services for you, to empower yourselves so
you can be well-informed and self-directed in
your own health care. And we find when young people
like yourselves come in, a lot of times you’re coming
in from your pediatrician and your parents accompany
you on your clinic visit. And now you’re here in
the big time and you get to accompany yourself
into the health center. And so, it’s a great opportunity
for you to get access to health care that’s
confidential that is available to you, that doesn’t go
back to your parents. A lot of times, students
are worried about something that’s
very personal to them. They have questions
about their health and not comfortable talking
to their parents about it, and I would encourage you not
necessarily rely on your friends about the information but to come see us
at the health center. So, we do have a health center
here on campus, it’s in D105, which is the building
over there. We have very qualified staff. They’re licensed physicians and
nurses and nurse practitioners and we have a registered
dietitian. And so, we’re all
there to help you. There isn’t one person
who works there who doesn’t love working there. So we love working with
the college age population. We feel that we have
lots of information and services to offer you. And if any of you are
just out of high school, I want you to know that we’re
well beyond the high school nurse model, OK? So, I know sometimes the nurse
may give you very limited information, and pretty much
sometimes they’re calling home to ask your parents
to pick you up. You won’t see that here, OK? Just one of the ways I
market the health center is to talk about the three C’s. Again, I’m just going to talk
about the confidentiality, what goes on there stays there. None of your teachers,
administrators or your parents will
know about it. There are people–
there is a problem– not a problem but sometimes when you’re entering
PCC you’re not 18. So if you’re not 18, your parents would have signed
a consent form that said that you can get services there. We put that in your
registration form. So, you couldn’t register without that form
being on file with us. So I just want you to know your
parents have signed off on it. If for some reason there is
a loose connection on that and you need help, and there are
certain things we can’t help you with but I’m going to tell
you what we can help you with. If you are under 18 and that
consent form is not signed, we can help you with pregnancy, sexually transmitted
infections and birth control. At the age of 12, you can get
access to that kind of care in the community without
your parent consent. So I want you to be
informed about that. We also have counseling
services in the respect that we have physicians and
nurses there and a dietitian. If you need more
personal counseling, then I would encourage you to go
to psychology services which is in the L Building, L108. And that’s also free and
it comes under your– the 13-dollar health
fee that you paid at the beginning
of the semester. And then there are clinical
services, just to let you know, we do a lot of things
at the health center, and you’ll learn a little
bit more about that. But basically all
your visits are free. The health care is free with
the exception of some things that we have to charge
you for like a lab test, but that’s very low cost and the
medications are very low cost. And birth control is
available there too as well, so just for you to be aware of. So we have two nurse
practitioners who are specialists
in women’s health, and so they would be a great
resource for the women here, but certainly guys
can see them as well if they have other issues of personal sexual
reproductive system concerns. OK. So 411 is just the
information that we’re going to talk about the
information on STIs. Now, there are some people here
in the front who have clickers. How many of you are familiar
with clickers already? Just a couple of you? OK. These are automated
devices and it’s an opportunity for student health services to
collect data on the students, and it kind of gives us a
snapshot of who’s in the room. So I’m asking these
students to wait beyond 1:30. I mean, it might just go
right at 1:30 that we’ll end. But I need the data, so please
stay seated till we get all the questions asked at the beginning and at the end of
the presentation. OK, so the first question is– and I’m sorry I forgot
to change this over. But what is your age today? Are you less than 17, you
press number 1; 17, number 2. If you are 18 tomorrow,
you are still 17 today, OK, unfortunately. But we want to get the data so
it’s accurate of this group. So if you’re 20 or more,
you’re going to press number 5. We have 30 clickers out, so I
know that what number I’m going for is 30 up here and I
have 23 at the moment. So if you could point up
here to where my receiver is, that would be helpful. If you change your
mind during the– if you’ve had answer like
“Oh, no that’s not right” and you want to change it,
you certainly can change it. The last one you press is the
one that– thank you very much. The last one you press is the
one that’s going to register. So, 70 percent of the
class is 18 right now. OK. So we have no
one who is under 17. And 20 percent are 17, and just
a couple of there that are 19. What gender do you
identify with, male, female, or gender non-conforming? [ Inaudible Discussions ] OK, we have one more
person to press in here. Gender non-conforming might
be someone who is born into a female body but feels
more male is the kind of a sense of where they are or a
male who feels more female. So we do– I want you to know
that we do have a safe campus for students who are questioning
what their sexuality is. And Pasadena City College is
working towards a safe zone area of the whole campus. But in Student Health Services,
we do have a safe zone area. OK, so we have 50 percent of
the group is going to be male and 47 percent female, and 3
percent gender non-conforming. OK, 80 percent of
women and 50 percent of men do not have symptoms when
they’re infected with Chlamydia. Is that true or false? Eighty percent of the women
and 50 percent of the men who are infected with
Chlamydia do not have symptoms. Is that true or false? [ Inaudible Discussions ] OK, I’m going to ask you guys
to click just one more time. [ Inaudible Discussions ] OK. So, 43 percent of you
feel that that’s true, 57 percent feel it’s false. Somebody’s going to
change their mind today. Human papillomaviruses 16 and 18
cause cervical cancer in women and in men cause what? So in women, it causes
cervical cancer. In men, does it cause
oral and throat cancer, penile anal cancers, both one
and two, or neither one or two? [ Inaudible Discussions ] OK, if you could just
press one more time because you’re not clicking
when somebody just point up here to the podium area. And we’ll see if we can
capture that last person. OK. So 57 percent
feel it’s one and two, and 30 percent just
penile anal cancers and just oral and throat. What is the backup method if the current birth
control method may fail? What is the backup method if the
current birth control may fail? [ Inaudible Discussions ] So is it number one
condoms, Plan B-Next Choice, withdrawal or praying hard? [ Inaudible Discussions ] OK. So let’s talk
about 50 percent. Every person in this room, if we
were to go down the aisle here, down the rows, every other
person has not thought about pregnancy and how it
might impact them or someone in their family, or
someone around them. Now, this is male and female. Now, certainly, it’s going
to affect the female more because her body is
going to be changing. But just think about
this among teenagers. And this is– your group
is still teenagers– are still teenagers. You have to think about this. A lot of times, you’re kind of
like in the present and a lot of things are going
on, but you really need to think about pregnancy. And I’m talking about
men and women. So on the back table,
some of you may have seen that we do have some pamphlets
on birth control methods, we’re going to be
talking about that. There’s one pamphlet
there for the guys, it said men– what is it? It’s men, babies and the law. So, you might be think
this is fun times. But if your partner gets
pregnant and she has the baby, then you are legally responsible
for supporting that child until the child is 18. So it’s something you
need to be aware of. It’s a financial
responsibility legally. OK, 90 percent sexually active
teens not using any birth control are likely to
deal with a pregnancy within the first year
of sexual activity. Those are pretty high odds if
you’re not paying attention and getting something to help
yourself to not get pregnant. Now I’m going to tell
you the first option that I would strongly support is
abstinence because there’s a lot of things coming up in the
slides in the next part of the presentation that you
can avoid beyond pregnancy. A lot of times, we think about
pregnancy about birth control. But the other thing
is we want to think about the STIs that you can get. So if you’re abstinent, you’re
not only going to take care of the STIs and the– you’re
going to care of the STI’s and the pregnancy together. So we’re going to talk
about birth control. This is not meant to be an
all inclusive presentation. I can’t go over everything
in detail. I just want to give you a
brief overview so that you know that there are options
beyond birth control pills. Oftentimes, girls will come
in, young women will come in and they’ll say, “Gosh, I really
want to get birth control.” And the question we
ask, “What is it?” “The pill.” They don’t have any knowledge
of what’s beyond that. So I’m going to show you
today what is beyond that. But let’s go with basic
anatomy first because it is– hopefully, you’ll recognize
this as female anatomy. This is the vagina right here,
this is where the penis goes in and this is where the
baby comes out, OK? So this is the uterus
right here. It’s a muscular body that accommodates a
nine-month old fetus. There’s an opening here, this
is the sperm goes in and this is where the baby’s head comes out. So this is all musculature. And then there’s two fallopian
tubes on either side here and this is the ovary. The ovary actually
isn’t connected. This picture may look
like it is, but it’s not. So in a normal month of a
textbook case of a woman, the first day of her period
is the first day of her cycle. And she has a period
maybe three, four, five days up to seven days. And then she, at
midpoint, ovulates the egg, right– the ovary, rather. This is the ovary. It releases the egg. The egg goes up into the tube
and it travels down the tube and it goes and it lands
in here in the tissue area. If she’s not pregnant,
if she doesn’t– if that egg doesn’t get
fertilize with the sperm, then that just washes out
with the period at day 28, 29. OK, that’s textbook,
28-day cycle. So first day of the period, first through seven
days, it may be a period. Around day 11 to 15,
you’re going to ovulate, the eggs have been released. And then around day 28, if
that egg is not fertilized, it washes out with the period. OK. So, what happens here is
that the– right in this area, this is normally what happens,
if the sperm comes up here, it travels up the tube
and it goes here and meets up with the egg and
fertilizes it. The egg begins to
double in size. From the cellular
division in biology class, you know that everything
doubles in size. As it passes through here, it goes down here,
it lands in here. So you have a little conceptus or fertilize egg really growing
quite nicely when I get here. The plan I want to
make about this, if this is musculature
area that will expand with a fetus, this
does not expand. This is not made to expand. So it’s going to be a critical
point for the later part of the presentation
to know about that. And just another point
and it was a new fact that I didn’t know about till I
was reviewing for some of this that the part of this
tube is the diameter of a hair shaft, a
human hair shaft. So if you think about the
diameter or the thickness of your hair, that’s a very
small diameter on the inside of this tube and that’s
critical information to know about for later. So this is what the
woman looks like here. This is the male. He’s on the outside
here with his scrotum. He has two testicles. And this is where
the sperm begin to develop their production. And then as they mature and move
on towards their production, they sit up here
in the epididymis. And when they’re then
getting ready to go through the ejaculation or
the guy cums, then it goes up to the vas deferens, it
goes out behind the bladder, more fluid is added
to the semen. And then it goes out to
the shaft of the penis and through the urethra which
is the opening to the penis, OK? So that’s what the guy looks
like and that’s the woman. I did forget to mention at
the beginning of my present– my opening that I am a nurse,
by training, nurse practitioner. And so, I’m bringing
clinical photos to you today. They’re not all going
to look like this. You’re going to see
some real life photos. And so, I’m going to tell
you that can be uncomfortable for you but I’m going to
ask you to bear with me, OK? OK. So again, this
is just a top view and then this is the cervix. This is the opening. So if I were to put someone
at the table and look up into the vagina, then I’m
going to see this opening here. And this is, again,
where the sperm goes in and where the period
and the baby comes out. So it looks like a donut. Yeah? So when I was
instructed about this, I was told if you want to
know what it feels like, put your finger on your nose and
you’ll know what it feels like. But I’m going to
tell you, as a nurse, if you want to know
what it feels like, put your finger up
there and feel it. OK. The other nursing
piece of it is that I went to school here, I
got my basic nursing. I started out with the
LVN program here and one of my nursing instructors when
I was exactly your age, 19, said if you don’t know what
you look like down there, then get a mirror and find out. Now that sounds kind
of like graphic but it was really important
for me to hear and you need to know what you look like. And the reason is because
if something goes different, if you know something
isn’t quite right, at least you know what you are
when you’re feeling normal. So I encourage men and women
to get a mirror and look like– look what’s down there, OK? Find out what’s normal for you. You may have some skin lesions
that are normal for you. You need to know that. OK, so this is a
real life picture of what a cervix looks like. And I want to say to the women
that if you come in to see us at the health center, you can
ask to see your own cervix. If you go through a pelvic exam
with us, we have mirrors there and you can look and see what
your own cervix looks like. Just ask the practitioner, “Can I see what my
cervix looks like?” and we’ll show it to you, because every cervix it’s
a little bit different. OK, so let’s talk about
birth control methods. There is the sterilization
which is what? What’s sterilization? Where you can’t have children. What do they do with guys? They cut the tubes and, with
women, they cut the tubes. That’s so the egg can’t
pass through the tube and the sperm can’t come up
through the tubes for the guy. The guy can still ejaculate. He’s still going to have fluid. It’s just not going to
have any sperm in it, OK? So that’s sterilization. You’re likely not going to be
interested in that in this part of your– in this
time in your life, OK? But we do have implants, and these are little
like matchstick– — products, and they
have hormones in them. And they actually fit
underneath your skin. They slide in underneath your
skin and they produce hormones and they stop ovulation. The idea behind hormone
is to stop ovulation so you don’t produce an egg. So that slips in
underneath your skin and it stays there
about five years, OK? I’m going to pass these
around so you can feel them. I just hope to see
them at the end. And there’s also– there
you go, take a look at it. So that you know what it feels
like underneath the skin, you just rub your
finger across it this way and you’ll know what it feels
like underneath the skin. We also have intrauterine
devices. And they look like
what’s up on the screen. It’s a T-shaped device. It’s plastic. This particular one has
a copper wire around it. The wire acts as a
hostile environment and it’s this metal of copper. And it’s not a– it’s
a hostile environment in which an egg would
not want to be there. So that’s the idea
of the way it works. Also, the copper is
lethal to the sperm. It knocks off the
head on the sperm. There are two different– actually there are three
different types of IUDs. This one has metal, it
doesn’t have a hormone. The Mirena does have a hormone
and it lasts for five years. There’s also the Skyla one
and I think that’s seven years but I’m not exactly sure. So, this one is good
for 10 years. So I tell the women that
if you’re interested in getting a PhD or not
getting pregnant for 10 years, this could be a great option. It’s called the long-acting
reversible contraception, that’s what the Implanon
does, the Nexplanon. This is an older model but
then we have Nexplanon now, and this is good for 10 years. So, you might consider that. They’re very popular–
beginning to grow in popularity because they don’t have hormones
and they’re long-lasting. The other thing you need to
think about that you need to have– you might want
to have is the shot. The shot, you take once
every three months. The timing is critical. You have to come in
between 11 and 13 weeks. But that also is good for
women who don’t want to think about taking a pill everyday or having a device
inside their uterus. So that’s something
to think about. There are reasons that we have
so many birth control methods and that is because women
have medical conditions that they may not be
able to take the pill or they may not be able to
use this type of device. A shot might be better for them. So, many reasons for different
birth control methods, OK? We also have the pills,
the patch and the ring. And they are– all these
are hormonal-based. So the pills, you’re going to–
the whole idea of the pill, the patch and the ring
is that you’re going to have an active
birth control method for three weeks out
of the month. And then you’re going to not
have that method for one week when the woman has a period. So three weeks on the
hormone, one week off, you have the period, and
then you restart the cycle. So the pills, you have to
take them for three weeks. You have to remember to take
them everyday at the same time. You can’t be off-kilter
with that. It’s got to be like 8
o’clock every morning or 10 o’clock every night. It doesn’t really
matter the time. What matters is the timing that
you’re taking it every 24 hours. So many of you students
are taking lots of classes and you’re working and you’ve
got your other activities that you’re involved in and it’s
hard to keep the hour straight, that may not be a
good method for you. The other thing is the patch which is a hormone
that’s on a patch. It goes on your skin and
it stays there for a week. So it’s on one week,
you change the patch, and you change it three times. On the last week, you
remove the patch and then that week you have your period. And then there’s the ring. The ring, and you’re going
to see a system or a pattern with women that you
have a round– it’s a round circle
for women, OK? This is also impregnated
with hormones and this goes in the vagina and it stays
there for three weeks, and then you take it out
and you have a period. So, what’s nice about this,
and we’ve heard this a lot, that women come in and they’re
concern their parents are going to find their pills
or their condoms or whatever it’s going to be. So if you’re putting this in
your vagina for three weeks, your parents aren’t
likely to find it, right? [ Laughter & Inaudible Remarks ] So, the thing about the– just
about this to be aware of it, it can come out during
intercourse, so you want to make sure
that it doesn’t come out. It may come out when you’re
going to the bathroom, so you want to make sure it
doesn’t come out in the toilet. So the main thing that you
want to– if it does come out, you rinse it off and
you put it back, OK? But the main thing to be aware
of is that it is something that is very easy to use. So, it’s just one option and
you have to figure it out. Now, one thing about this, if
we’re talking about this kind of device, you have to
be comfortable talking– touching yourself,
some women aren’t, so that’s not going
to be a good option. She doesn’t have a medical
reason she can’t use this, but she’s not comfortable
touching yourself, OK? Which takes me back to the
mirror in the beginning of the lecture, I would
encourage you to start looking at yourself and seeing
what’s there, OK? All right. I do have a story
behind this where one of my colleagues wasn’t sure
if she wanted to get pregnant and she came home one day, she
was using this particular method and she found the
ring on her dresser and she asked her husband, “Why
is this ring on the dresser?” He said, “The dog was walking
around with it in her mouth and I thought that
I was on hair ties, so I just put it
on the dresser.” And they had baby number three. OK, so you probably have heard
about the morning-after pill. It probably it’s on–
you see it in ads. This is something
that’s an option for you. There is the category of
emergency contraception. There are three ways
that you can have emergency contraception. One is this which is
the morning-after pill. One is the IUD that they
can put in within five days of the unprotected intercourse and then one is taking
some pills. So, we carry this particular
product in the health center. It’s called Next Choice. You can get Plan
B or Next Choice. You can get it over the counter. Up until a few months back,
you had to ask the pharmacist about it and you had
to prove that you’re at least 17 to get it. Those rules have gone away. OK. But if you go to the
pharmacy, you may be paying 40 or 50 dollars for this pill. You come to the health
center, you’re going to pay 9. And a planned parenthood,
I’m not sure if they charge anything, but
you can get it there, OK? The idea behind this is if you’re worried your birth
control method may fail, in other words, you
screwed up your schedule of taking your pills, you
missed a couple of days, that would be the time, if
you’re having intercourse, that you would have this. If the condom breaks or
if there’s a situation where you’re having intercourse
and you weren’t planning on it and it just happened, then you’d
want to think about this option. Because I can tell
you, 40 or 50 dollars at Rite Aid is a lot
cheaper than a pregnancy, OK? So this is something
that you can anticipate. If you just want to have this
in your emergency cabinet, in your cabinet or your
home, your purse, whatever, you might want to have
something stashed there in case something
like that happens. So this is meant to be
an emergency option. It’s not meant to be you’re
having sex once a week and you’re going
to use this, OK? It’s meant to be a
backup to what you have. So the most critical thing
is it’s best to do it, take the medication as
soon as the intercourse– as close to the intercourse
as you can, the one that was unprotected. But if you don’t get it,
you can go out to 120 hours. But really, the best
time is within 72 hours. The best time is within 72 hours where you can get 89
percent effective. What– how this works? Specifically, it
delays ovulation. That means that the
egg won’t be released. And then if you continue
to have intercourse between the time you take that
pill and your next period, then you have to use birth
control in there as well, condoms, some other
method as well. Because we just said that
we’re delaying ovulation, that doesn’t mean that
another egg isn’t coming and you’re going to get nailed
on that intercourse, OK? All right. So we talk about male
and female condoms. You probably know that
we have latex condoms. If you have some irritation, either partner has some
irritation after intercourse and there’s some
scratchiness or irritation, it might be you have
a latex allergy. This is one product you can
use on the left hand part of the screen, it’s
called Avanti. You want to get more
of a different type of non-latex material
in having intercourse. Then we have the female
condom, and I’m going to show you what
that looks like. It’s called the Reality condom. It comes packaged like this. And I would encourage you to
go over to Rite Aid or CVS or whatever and look in their
birth control area, you know, their– the contraceptive area
and check out the products. This is what Reality
condom looks like. In real life, this is
what you’re going to see. This is a female condom. Why would we want
a female condom? Why would we need one?>>Don’t trust the guy. Say that again.>>Don’t trust the guy.>>Don’t trust the guy. [ Laughter ] Yeah, OK. So as he was
saying, you don’t trust the guy to wear the condom, right? OK. So basically, a lot of
guys don’t like to use condoms and they’re going to be
quite strong about that and the woman still feels like
she wants to have intercourse with him, this gives
the woman control. She can say, “If we’re going
to have sex, then we’re going to use a condom that I have.” OK? So the women need
to feel empowered here that they can protect
themselves. So it looks like this. The good thing about this
is that a man doesn’t want to use a female– a male
condom with a female condom, the two don’t go together. It’s one or the other, just because of the
materials and how they are. The thing of this
is, is that, again, you’re going to see a circle. You’ll never think of
a taco the same now. You’re going to fold it like a
taco and you’re going to put it up inside the vagina
and you’re going to– this is the target for the guys. OK? This is your target. So don’t want to be on
either side of the sleeve, of this condom, because
that defeats your purpose. This is where the
penis needs to go, OK? So once he ejaculates,
it’s caught in this area. And then you just twist
it and you’ll pull it out. It’s very flexible. Sometimes when they’re
new, they can– you’re only going to use
this once, by the way. And sometimes when they’re new,
they’re going to– it feels– it might feel– it
might be a little noisy, I’ll just forewarn
you about that. There you go. It’s only been touched
by my hands. [ Laughter ] [ Inaudible Discussions ] OK, so we worry about– So we do have– again,
just if the women are– if they worry they might have
an allergy or an irritation from the latex condoms, you can
switch over to this Reality, just to keep that in mind. I think they’re 2 or 3
dollars each for each type. So this is the diaphragm. The diaphragm comes
in different sizes because women come
in different sizes. And if a woman gains or
loses 10 or 15 pounds, she has to have this refitted. This requires to go into the
clinic and have it fitted, and she needs to learn
how to put it in and out. But again, here you are, you have a round disk
that looks like this. You don’t want a hole in it. Because what happens if
you put a hole in it, the sperm are going
to get in, right? So we just these
with holes in them so you don’t walk out with them. They’re not going to
do you any good, OK? Again, you’re going to
squeeze like a taco. You’re going to put
it up inside. And what’s it covering
when it’s inside? What’s that thing that looks
like– feels like your nose? Cervix, right. So it’s covering the cervix. You see this is a
nice barrier method. It goes in within a half
hour of intercourse. It stays in for six to eight
hours after intercourse. If they have repeated
intercourse, then they have to put more spermicidal jelly
in there and keep it in place. This is a good option
for someone who doesn’t see their
boyfriends very often. Maybe he’s at the
military and he comes home and he’s only going to be home a
month, this might be something. If the woman can’t take
any birth control pill or a hormonal-based method, she
could use something like this. But you have to, again, be
comfortable touching yourself. OK. There you go. [ Inaudible Discussions ] OK, the sponge is something
you can be over the counter. Again, it works the same way. It’s round and you wet it a
little bit with some fluid, like I think it’s water
and it activates it, so it’s spermicidal, and then
it will kill the sperm once the sperm are in there. It’s a one time use
item as well. You can go again to Rite Aid, look at all the different
preparations. You can have suppositories
and gels and foams, all those things, and
they’re going to be available to you over the counter. So you don’t have to see someone
in the clinic to choose those. Withdrawal. What is withdrawal? [ Inaudible Remark ] What is it? Some people use withdrawal
as a method. And I heard the word here. What is it?>>Pullout.>>Pullout. The guy pulls out right
before he ejaculates. But we talked about this
in the group on Wednesday and the guys admit
it’s pretty hard to do. Because it’s such a split
second decision, right? So if the guy is
ready to ejaculate, sometimes it’s really hard
to pull out because you want to kind of finish it off inside. So it’s not an– it’s
not an option, really, sometimes for some people. So if you know your
body really well and you can do it, that’s fine. But it’s not full proof because
the pre-cum, what some guys call “magic juice”, has sperm in it. [ Inaudible Discussions ] OK, so the other thing that
you can use is a calendar and taking your temperature
everyday. I’m not going to
encourage you to do that. If you want to learn about that
and how to do, we’ll be happy to help you about that
in the health center. But generally, that
method is used for people who want to get pregnant. They want to know
when they’re ovulating and they’re trying
to get pregnant. And again, it’s not
a full proof as well. But it is an available option. OK. So let’s talk
about lubricants. And I mentioned to you and I
keep saying it, if you’re going to get some irritation,
that’s something that could set you
up for an STI. So we want to look at
lubricants and we know that they can make sex more
fun and it can be easier if you’re having
trouble with lubrication. You have to have less friction because if you have more
friction, you’re subject to micro-tears, and
so you want something that reduces the
evidence of micro-tears. Hey guys, sit up. All right. All right, so the problem is, is that when you have
an interior lining, either your urethra or inside
the vaginal wall, you risk the– your risk go up for
getting another STI, such as HIV transmission
and herpes. So let’s look at some
options in lubricants. We’ve got Vaseline,
Vasenol, Astroglide, Johnson’s Baby Oil,
butter, Reddi-wip. [ Inaudible Discussions ] OK. So I will tell you– who
can tell me why I’m crossing these off? [ Inaudible Remark ] Yeah, OK. So, you know, it’s
in the heat of the moment and you think, “Oh my gosh, I
need something,” and you run to the kitchen and grab this. Do not grab any of these. [ Laughter ] Why don’t we want to grab these? Why don’t we want to grab these? It increases infection. That’s one thing. It can increase– ’cause
you’ve got this sort of oil. The basic bottom line
is that it’s oil-based and the oil will
damage the condom and the condom has a
higher risk of breaking. That’s why we don’t use it. OK, so always use a
water-based lubricant. We give away one in the health
center, it’s called Astroglide. It’s a great water-based
lubricant, but there are others to try. So I would encourage to
experiment and check those out. Reddi-wip is fun, I can
tell you that, that’s fun. But don’t try to use
it as a lubricant, OK? All right. So a good idea, we want you to
be using condoms and we want you to use them every time
you have intercourse because it helps prevent a
sexually transmitted infection and a pregnancy. So we’re going to
take a condom break and let’s talk about condoms. You probably are already
pretty familiar with this, but I want to go over
it and I’m going to ask for a male volunteer to come and
help me show how this goes on. [ Inaudible Discussions ] Let’s go over some of
the finer points of– let’s go over the finer points. Sit down. [ Laughter ] I didn’t say yet. All right. Hold on. OK, so we
have the package. We have the package
and how do we know– we want to make sure
that the condoms that we use aren’t
damaged already, that they don’t have holes
in them already, right? OK. So how do I know it
doesn’t have a hole in it? [ Inaudible Remarks ] It’s not open, yeah,
that’s true. But also you want to feel it
because when their packaged, they have a little
air bubble in them. So if you feel that air bubble
which I can feel up here, there’s no hole in it. The other gentleman here said
that you want to check the date. That’s true. You want to make sure
it’s not expired. So, this one is good
until 11/13. Wow! So, next month. All right. [ Laughter ] So– by the way, we do
give away free condoms at the health center, so you could just walk
in and pick them up. At the end of this presentation,
you’ll see some free condoms on the table that you
can help yourself to. OK. So, the expiration date
is good, the bubble is good. When I open it up, I do not want
to do this with my teeth, OK? Some people might be inclined
to want to do it with the teeth. Don’t do it because you
can put a hole in it. Be careful with you
nails as well. You want to open it up so that
you don’t have a hole in it. OK, so the thing about the
condom is that we encourage you to use one that has
reservoir tip in it. So that gives you a little
extra space for the ejaculation. Because there’s a lot of
pressure when you ejaculate and the one– the rounded tip, they’re more likely
to break, OK? So the reservoir tip is there
for a couple of reasons, but that’s the main reason. You want to make sure that
you’re putting it on correctly. And then when you
put the condom on, as soon as the penis is hard,
that’s when you put it on. You don’t play around
a little while and then decide to put it on. Because chances are,
the playing goes on and you forget the
condom, all right? OK. So what do guys
complain about condoms?>>It doesn’t feel good.>>It doesn’t feel good. Yeah. Decreases the
sensitivity, right? So the option that you
can do with that is that you put a little of
that lubricant I spoke about, the water-based lubricant, you put it in the
little reservoir here. You put the lubricant
on the shaft to the penis when it’s hard. Your roll the penis down. You want to squeeze out the air, roll the condom down
over the penis. And then you put more
lubricant on the outside, OK. That increases the conductivity and the sensitivity is
reported to be better. So that’s an option. So you have some
homework this weekend. All right. OK. So, this is where
the guy comes in. Where is guy who’s going to
come up and help with this? Come on up here. [ Inaudible Discussions ] [ Laughter ] What’s your name?>>William.>>William.>>Yeah.>>So William is here. Why don’t we start out
by giving him a hand? [ Applause ] OK. So, we don’t
have lubricant today, so we’re just going to squeeze. When you put the condom
on the hard penis, you’re going squeeze
it and then put it on and roll it all the way down. So what I’d like you to do
is put your thumb inside. Put your hand–>>Are you putting
it on my hand?>>I am.>>All right. [ Inaudible Discussions ] It feels really good, you guys. [ Laughter ] [ Inaudible Discussions ] [ Applause ]>>So the question for the
ladies is, is it too small? No.>>This one is.>>No. Don’t open
up your hand here. OK.>>OK.>>That’s pretty cool. It’s not cutting
off circulation–>>Not yet. Yeah, yeah, yeah. OK. So the other point I
want to make here too is that once the guys
has ejaculated and before he goes really soft,
you want to put your fingers around the base of the
penis and pull out. Either partner can do that. The reason you want
to do that is because there’s a
little ribbing here. And if it– it can catch on
the outside of the partner and pull off and then the
whole plan has been defeated because it comes off
inside the partner, OK? Great. So, the other thing I say at this point is
I tell the women that if you got something
this big coming at you, get out of town. [ Laughter ] Here, hold on a second. [ Laughter ] Here you go. You might want some.>>Yeah, that would be great.>>You want just this
or you want some–>>No, that’s fine. Yeah.>>You’re a good sport.>>Thank you.>>So, William was a good sport
so he gets a lunch at Subway.>>OK, thanks. [ Noise ] [ Applause ] [ Inaudible Discussions ] OK, that kind of wraps up the
piece about birth control. Are there any questions? Anyone’s brave enough to ask?>>If you’re ready to go again,
you can put a new one on, right?>>Yeah. He asked if
you’re ready to go again, when you’re ready to go
again, you put a new one on. Yes. So one time use only. And I would ask you to turn–
pull it off, put a knot in it and toss it, OK, in the can. All right. So we’re going to go
forward now and talk about sexually transmitted
infections. This is much more graphic. You’re going to see
real clinical pictures. I’m just letting you know that. We do have over 20 different
types of STIs out there, but I can only talk about a few. I can’t even cover
hepatitis B which is important for all of you to know about. It’s a sexually transmitted. I can’t even speak about– I
can’t even speak about HIV today because I’m really going to–
not that does aren’t important, they are important, but
they’re just so much time to keep your attention, and so
I’m going to hit the bigger ones for us right here today. So, one in two sexually active
persons will have a sexually transmitted infection
by the time they’re 25. That’s 50 percent. Again, it’s every other
person in this room. So those are pretty
significant statistics. Women are more vulnerable
than men. Why would that be? [ Inaudible Remark ] Yeah, but why are
they’re more vulnerable– we’re going to move
away from pregnancy and just talk about an STI. Why are women more
vulnerable than men in getting a sexually
transmitted infection? More surface area. OK, anything else? [ Inaudible Remark ] Hmm? [ Inaudible Remark ] No. I’m going to give you a hint
that it’s an anatomical reason. [ Inaudible Remark ] She’s inside. She’s more internal, exactly. And so, she has this– she’s
a receptacle, quite frankly, and he goes in and
he ejaculates, and whatever he ejaculates
besides sperm is there. Whatever is on his
penis is there and she’s left to absorb it. He pulls out, moves
on, she’s got it for a few days before
it moves on itself. I just want to make the point that a woman can start her
period and she doesn’t know it for a couple of days because
it hasn’t dropped down. The flow hasn’t come down
far enough for her to know. That’s the same thing with this. You can be exposed to
organisms and not know it. So you want to ask
about getting tested. This is really critical. If you are sexually active, you
should be testing for Chlamydia to begin with, and then
there maybe some other ones that we have to start
talking about. So, the risk factors for
STIs is sex in an early age. What is the average age
of first intercourse? [ Inaudible Remarks ] Fifteen. Average age, 15. Fifteen, OK? And if we’re going to
talk about oral sex, what do you think the age is? [ Inaudible Remarks ] It’s young. We’re hearing fourth graders. [ Inaudible Remarks ] So when you’re talking about
oral sex, you’re not talking about risk of pregnancy,
but you are talking about– you are talking about risk of sexually transmitted
infections, OK? Multiple partners. The more times you have sex
with different partners, the more risk you have. The risks are going up, OK? I read a statistic where over a
lifetime women have 10 percent chance of getting
cervical cancer. But every time they have a
new partner, it goes up by 10 or 15 percent with
each new partner. So it’s something
to be aware of. So you have multiple
partners, you’re having sex at a young age, and
it’s unprotected. Because when you’re 14
and 15 and 16 years old, you’re not thinking about that. And you may not be thinking
about it in your early 20s. But if you’re having unprotected
sex, you have an exposure to organisms that you can’t see. Now, I use the example of sex– with having sex with those
who’ve had sex with others. So, you’re having
multiple partners when you’re having
sex with people. And the reason is because
when May has sex with Kent and then Kent goes on
and has sex with Chris, Chris is actually having
sex with May and Kent. And then when Chris goes
on and had sex with Alex, Alex is actually, on a
cellular, microscopic level, Alex is having sex with
Chris and May and Kent. So whoever you’re sleeping
with, you’re sleeping with whoever they slept
with and that person again. Now, I intentionally left the
names Chris and Alex neutral or gender neutral, and so
Chris could be female or male, Alex could be female or male. And so, we have bisexual
individuals. And so, if someone
is experimenting and they don’t know, they’re
questioning, they’re not sure, there can be that
bisexual exposure as well, so just to be aware of that. OK, so here’s your
normal cervix. And now, we’re going to see
something a little different. So– This is a normal cervix. It just looks a little
bit different. But I want to point out, this
is the opening, this is os, and this is again where
the sperm goes in, the baby comes out. You can see that the tissues
are a little bit different. When we do Pap smears on women, we check for precancerous
lesions. This is what we’re checking. We take a little brush
and we just, you know, go over that a little
bit with a brush. It’s painless. We capture some cells there
and we look for changes. When women are infected
with the organism that causes cervical cancer, this is what we’re
picking up right here, OK? So that’s normal. You can see normal life reflex. There’s no lesions there. There’s nothing happening. Here, it look– it’s immature. And so, you can see that that
tissue is really vulnerable. I mean you don’t have
to be a clinician to see that this is really vulnerable. And so, if this person is
like 12, 13, 14 years old and she’s having
unprotected sex, you can see why she
would be more vulnerable for getting a sexually
transmitted infection. Now, a 22 and 24 and
28-year old can have a cervix that looks like this too. Just to be aware of that. But I’ve made the point
because when you’re young and you’re developing, your
cervix is going to look like this and then
eventually it goes away. This is the infected cervix. You can see it’s red and
it’s kind of friable-looking. You know, it kind of looks
like it could bleed easily and it has a discharge,
a pussy discharge. So Chlamydia, which
you may remember from the beginning slides,
is a bacterial infection. It is the most common bacterial
infection among the sexually transmitted infections,
most common. It is in the college age
population like no other. It’s the highest. It’s the worse problem we have
in your age group, 15 to 25. So, 80 percent of the
women aren’t aware that they have this infection, 50 percent of the
men are unaware. The symptoms can include an
abnormal vaginal discharge, bleeding after intercourse, painful urination,
and penile discharge. But remember, women are inside,
they can have this infection and not know that they have it. With gonorrhea, that’s the
others sexually transmitted infection that’s
based with bacteria. Fifty percent of the women
don’t know they have symptoms and 90 percent don’t know
that they have symptoms when it’s a sore throat. So we’re going back
to oral sex again and when you have oral
sex, you are at risk for getting gonorrhea if
you’re not having condoms, using condoms for oral sex. OK. So on that note, I
just want you to know that we do give away flavored
condoms on the health center. So we have banana and chocolate
and strawberry and mint. So there’s about five
different flavors there for you. So you can stop in
and pick them up, OK? Incidentally, I do
have a Magnum up here. We give those away as well. But for the guys, I just
want you to know that a lot of this is partially marketing
because these Magnums are only 1 to 2 millimeters larger than the
one I had up here on William, thickness of 1 to 2 millimeters,
OK, or the diameter of it. OK, so I want to go
back to oral sex. We do have a problem
with gonorrhea. It is approaching
super bug status which means we are running out
of medications to treat it. It is a serious infection and
it’s something that we have to watch for and screen for. So when you have gonorrhea,
you have some painful swelling. You can have burning
with urination. Usually the guys will come in
and they may have some tingling and we’ll treat them right away. I will tell you if
a guy comes in and says something is really
different, I’m having tingling or burning sensation
when I’m urinating, we will treat you right there
on the spot for Chlamydia. Most often, it’s Chlamydia. But a lot of times, Chlamydia
and gonorrhea run together, so we’ll test you for both. If it goes untreated,
then the guy can get into urethral scarring and
a painful epididymitis. That’s where the tube
sits on top of testes. That can get inflamed
and infected. And it can result in not
being able to father a child. So that’s something
to be aware of. With women, it can
migrate up the cervix. It can go up into the uterus
and then the fallopian tubes. And it can cause pelvic
inflammatory disease and can result in infertility. It’s something that
we’re very worried about in your population. So one thing about
gonorrhea that’s separate from the Chlamydia, it can go
onto your brain, in your heart, and in to your joints. And I personally know someone
that it went into their joints and she ended up in
the hospital with it. So it is as serious infection. It makes you more susceptible
to HIV infection just because of the way it
impacts your system. If a woman were to give
birth while she had an active infection, she could pass it
on to her child, her infant, her newborn, and that could
result into blindness. OK, so here are our
pictures now. This is the outside of a woman
and you can see she’s got sort of a fullness here that’s red, that’s an abscess
that’s probably caused from either gonorrhea
or Chlamydia. And this is just the
hyperpigmented woman. She has something
a little different but it’s along the same line. This is the cervix. Now this one looks different. This one kind of looks
angry, don’t you think? [ Laughter ] It’s reddened, there’s
discharge from it. This is a pussy discharge
and this is the point where I tell the guys when
you go in without a condom, the end of your penis is going
right into this discharge. And you’re not feeling that. It just feels the same in there. You’re not going to know. OK. This is another discharge. Again, here’s the cervix opening and there’s discharge
all around there. Let’s get the guys
equal time here. This is a guy who has
a pussy discharge. It’s something that you
need to be aware of. I can tell you this guy is
going to be in the clinic because that’s not normal. [ Inaudible Discussions ] OK. So when you have gonorrhea,
Chlamydia, we worry about woman in particular going on to
pelvic inflammatory disease. That’s when the pelvic
organs get really congested, inflamed and uncomfortable. It can result in infertility
and ectopic pregnancy or chronic pelvic pain. This is very uncomfortable,
when you can’t sit and you can have an intercourse
because it’s too painful. This is pelvic inflammatory
disease. This is normal, a
normal fallopian tube. This is what it looks
like when it gets inflamed and swollen and uncomfortable. So what’s an ectopic pregnancy? [ Inaudible Remarks ] OK. So an ectopic pregnancy is when a pregnancy occurs
outside what’s normal. So remember what’s normal is
that the egg goes down here, implants, and grows
into a fetus. When you have an
ectopic pregnancy, that can happen where– if
you recall at the beginning of the lecture, I
said it’s very narrow. And if you have scarring from an
STI like gonorrhea or Chlamydia, that scarring can cause the
other thing conceptus to stop. And so as this conceptus
is going down, the fertilized egg is going
down here, it can stopped on a narrow part of the tube
because of the scarring. And remember, it’s just the size
of a hair shaft in some places. So if it gets stopped and
it’s stuck and it can’t move but it’s growing,
what’s going to happen? It’s going to explode. It’s going to rupture. And that’s a surgical
emergency for the woman. She’s going to be in the OR. She’s going to be having I think
this opened up and they’re going to have to take out that– that’s not a viable
product anymore, that conceptus is not going
to survive, it’s done. But then they’re going to
try to repair this tube to put it back together so that
she can get pregnant another time in her life when
she’s ready for that, OK? So this is a surgical emergency. So, when you have
an STI history, you have an increased risk of
getting an ectopic pregnancy. Increased pregnancy
of ectopic pregnancy, you have an increased risk of
being sterile or infertile, not being able to conceive. Because if you blow up this
side, you may be only left with this side to get pregnant. So, we offer free
Chlamydia testing. It’s a urine test at
the health center. It doesn’t require an exam. You come in and say, “I just
want to do the STI testing,” we will do it for you for free. You just can’t pee for an
hour before the test, OK. You did the test, we send it in. If you come back positive,
we’re going to treat you at the health center for free. If your partner is
a PCC student, we’ll treat your PCC
student partner for free. If you turned out to be positive
for Chlamydia, we’re going to go on and test you for
gonorrhea, syphilis and HIV. We do have an HIV counselor at
the health center on Tuesdays and he does the oral test,
so you get your results right at the time of the
appointment, OK? If you’re not positive, but
you want to do the other test, then the tests are low cost, but you didn’t get those
through us as well. We’re not– we worry about
herpes, that’s a virus. The one thing about Chlamydia
and gonorrhea is pretty nice because we do have antibiotics. When you get in to viruses
like what we’re going to talk about now, we don’t
have treatment for that. We only have medications that
kind of can reduce the symptoms. So you have herpes
1 and 2, no cure. If you know someone who has
fever blisters on their mouth or cold sores, don’t allow
them to go down on you, OK, because it can be transmitted
to your genital area. And if you have that, be
responsible and don’t go down on someone because
you can transmit it to their genital area, OK? If you– now the thing
is, is with oral sex and genital sex intermixed,
the two can mix up. So you can have genital
herpes at your mouth and you can have oral
herpes in your genital area. The main thing about the virus
is that it’s stored in your skin and it’s always shedding. As your dead skin flakes
off, so does the virus. So, although it’s a less risk when you don’t have
the active lesion, it is possible to get it. It’s a much less risk. But when you have
an active lesion, you are shedding virus
that is communicable. This is what it looks
like in a man’s penis. And you can see that
it’s kind of a blister. This hurts. This guy would not
be in school today. It has its natural
progression of what it does. It breaks up. They erode. They become ulcers. And you’re going to see what
it looks like on a woman when it becomes ulcerative. [ Inaudible Remarks ] This is very painful. She would not be sitting
in this class today either. OK. So you do not want– — to have exposure to this. And I didn’t mention, but we
do have dental dams as well and they come in different
flavors and they come in latex and non-latex. If you’re having oral
sex, you may want to have a dental barrier, OK. This is can be purchased. We have them at the
health center. You can stop and then ask
for them, they’re there. But you need– if
you’re having oral sex, you need to have a barrier
because you’re not going to know if someone’s got an
infection with that or not. They’re not going to be talking
to you if they look like that. OK. [ Laughter ] Why do I have Michael
Douglas up here? [ Laughter ] [ Inaudible Remarks ] Why do I have Michael Douglas? Anybody?>>He’s the man.>>Huh?>>He’s the man.>>He’s the man. [ Laughter ] Michael Douglas, you may know, just separated from–
what’s her name? Catherine Zeta-Jones, right? But he was in the news
about a year or so ago because he’s been
diagnosed with throat cancer. And the underlying problem
with throat cancer is that it caused oftentimes
most likely from HPV, human papillomavirus, which is
the most common viral infection in the United States and
I think in the world. So when we talk about the
chances of you having an STI between now and 25, this
really increases your chances because it’s a viral infection. It’s called human
papillomavirus. And there are over
100 strains of it. But 40 of those different
types can cause– come from a sexually
transmitted infection, OK? Of those 40 types, four in
particular are linked to cancer, cancer of the cervix, cancer of
the penis, the anus, the vulva, the outside of a
woman, and the throat. So we’re seeing a big
increase among the oral cancers and this is the underlying
problem with it. It’s more noticeable
in men right now. But I just saw an article
the other day that said that by 2020, the year
2020, throat cancer based on HPV will outpace
cervical cancer in women. That’s a pretty significant
statistic. So it’s the most
common viral infection. You can get it skin
to skin contact. So if you have warts on your
skin and you come in contact with someone, you can
get warts that way too. It’s a virus. Viruses are very common. We live with them all day long. But when they’re
genitally-based, then we have to more concerned about that. You don’t have to
do it to get it. You just have intimate contacts. Someone has got some
warts, you can get it too. OK, so a condom only
provides some protection because they can break
and you can have exposure that way to it. And the condoms are
only going to cover that area that it covers. So the whole skin folds and
the area of skins around it, the skin around is not going to
prevent you from getting HPV. So we worry about 6 and 11. This is a low risk HPV. It causes genital warts. Most people have these not
know that they have them. They can be pink or gray. They can be raised,
flat, single, clustered, they look like cauliflowers. So between tacos and
cauliflowers, you’re not going to have– you’re going to have
a different reference now, OK? So they can call– it causes
itchiness and irritation, so you might– that
might be your first clue that you have it. Sometimes women have
a vaginal itching area and they think they
have a yeast infection, this is actually what’s
an underlying problem. This is what it looks
like on a woman. Now this is a different
case but I– when I said to you that you
have skin to skin contact, you can also have what we call– also have what we
call autoinoculation. In other words, you can
give it to yourself. So this woman probably
gave it to herself and that when her legs came together
to walk, she crossed over. And that’s why you see
the two lines here. You can see there’s a row
here and there’s a row here. And then there’s little spots
up in here, all this area here. These are all little venereal
warts or genital warts. On the man, it looks a
little bit different. Now he can look like this. And I’ve actually seen a case
on a man where he came in and the best way I can
describe it to you is that his entire scrotum
was covered with warts. And it looked like someone had
lopped off the top of an eraser from a pencil and just
pasted it on his scrotum. And it was full. And I said, “How long has
your scrotum look like this?” And he said, “Look like what?” He had no idea that
it was different. It was another guy
who wasn’t tuned in. Now, the place where
I found this fellow where I was practicing at
that time was a chemical dependency program. So it’s possible that
he was, you know, under chemical influence a lot and just wasn’t paying
attention. But you need– that’s
why you need to pay attention to your body. Guys could miss something
like this, OK? That is infectious
though, it is communicable. So the main thing is–
so that’s the low risk. So the low risk numbers, 6
and 11, cause genital warts. Then we worry more as
well about 16 and 18. These are high risk. You can have no symptoms. We might pick it up on
a Pap smear with women. She can have bleeding
or spotting in between her periods
or after intercourse. This is the cause of this
cancers, so the cervix, the anus, the penis, the
vagina, the head and neck. So 16 and 18 are the causes for
throat cancer in men as well. This is what it looks like
when you look at it at someone and you’re looking
at a cervix again. You see this area, if I were
to take a little wooden spatula and try to scrape that off,
we couldn’t scrape it off. That’s what it looks like. So guys, you’re not
going to feel this. I’m telling you,
you won’t feel this. The other thing I want
to point out for those of you who are smokers. Smoking increases the
proliferation of warts. And they had found
pepsinogens in this mucosa. It’s a co-factor with
HIV– HPV infection. So when women have
cervical cancer, one of the things they’re going to ask them is, “Are
you smoker?” So if you’re a smoker, you’re increasing your chances
here of having a problem.>>Like cigarettes.>>Cigarettes. So when we’re smoking
cigarettes, we’re talking about the carcinogens
that are made in. And the jury is still out on
those e-cigarettes, by the way. This is what it looks
like when it gets to be very proliferative, OK? This is pretty significant. It’s up in here as well. And then for the men,
we’ll give you equal time. [ Noise ] So these are all
warts around here. This is perianal warts. [ Inaudible Remarks ] So leave the little
light going on there because I encourage you
leave the lights on, OK? You want to check your
partners for clues. Check your partners
for any discharge or any little skin tags. [ Inaudible Remarks ] OK, so the good thing–
the good news here– the good news is that we have
a vaccine that prevent these. Sign up right away, yeah. OK. So basically, we’ll
worry about this for? There’s a vaccine on the
market called Gardasil. It’s been out since 2006. And it is recommend that
you take it that we start it around age 11 and 12
for girls specifically, but men are encouraged
to get it as well. And particularly up around age
19, 20, they should have it. I’m going to ask a question, if we find on Pap smear woman
is infected with one of these, number 6 or number 16,
would you encourage her to get the vaccine
anyway or say, “No, we’re not going to do that.” Get the vaccine anyway. Because she may be
infected with 16 but we can help her
protect her against 6, 11, and 18 as well, OK? So please know that if you do
not have an insurance right now, that at the health
center, you can come and get this vaccine for free. It is worth 400 dollars. If you had to pay the outside
price, go out through a clinic and pay for it, it’s a
series of three shots. You’ll be paying close
to 400 dollars for it. But if you do not have insurance
currently, you can come to the health center under
our Patient Assistance program where we can give
this to you for free. I strongly encourage every
woman and every men in here, if you’re sexually
active, even if you’re not, get started on this
and get protected because that ends at age 26, OK? So the take home message
is to be informed, get yourself tested,
and get vaccinated. You’ve had a lot of
information here today. I can’t possibly go over
what more there is there but you certainly can come
in for more information. You can come in on
individual counseling. So hold on a second,
I’m going to ask you all to remain seated please
’cause I want to go through these last
final questions. This is for the men and the
women who have the clickers. Eighty percent of the
women and 50 percent of the men do not have symptoms when they’re infected
with Chlamydia. So is that true or false? [ Inaudible Discussions ] Just point and click. [ Inaudible Discussions ] Point and you click
one more time. [ Inaudible Discussions ] So the answer is true. So there’s a difference
in opinion there. Human papillomavirus
is 16 and 18. I’m going to ask you all to
be quiet, if you please can, ’cause I need to get this
information here at the front. And I’m open to any questions
that you may have as well. So human papillomaviruses 16
and 18 cause cervical cancer and in men cause what? [ Inaudible Discussions ] I’m going to need all the
clickers up here in the front when you’re down
with them as well. So good. What is a backup method that current birth control
method may not– may fail? [ Inaudible Discussions ] I want to make an
announcement as well. Ms. Tran [assumed
spelling] is going to be stamping your passports
for you, so please don’t leave if you need that
passport stamped. [ Inaudible Discussions ] Good answer. How many sexual partners have
you had in the last year? [ Inaudible Discussions ] I ask you to stay, I
have few more questions. Yeah, you will, when
you’re done with it please. OK, there are some
significant numbers here. I just want to say that
this group is higher for a no partners
in the last year than the other previous groups. However, there are more among
the three, four and five. So I would encourage those
who fall in that category to definitely come in and
get some testing done. This is what a normal PCC or an
average PCC student looks like. They’ve had 30 percent about
no partners or one partner and then a lower amount. So this group is
higher for number of activities or
sexual partners. If you’re wondering about your
relationship if it’s healthy or not, you certainly can get–
go to this LoveIsRespect.org. I need your feedback, if you
just answer this question. Did the presenter help you
identify a specific health risk or behavior? If you could change, would you
protect or promote your health. [ Inaudible Discussions ] In which category that the
health risk behavior belong? Was it in the availability
of a lab test, risk reduction behaviors,
health counseling, or birth control education? [ Inaudible Discussions ] Thank you. You could just point up here
and press for me please. [ Inaudible Discussions ] And one final question. On a scale of 1, not interested,
to 5, very interested. How committed are you in changing your health risk
behavior and in protecting and promoting your health? [ Inaudible Discussions ] Great. If you just drop
the clickers up here, that’ll be great
and help yourself to the stuff in the back. Thank you. [ Inaudible Discussions ] [ Music ]

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