Two-Syllable Words – Can you Identify Stress? American English


Hey guys, I’m on my way to take a look at
my wedding venue. You’re going to come along and study American English pronunciation in
this real life English video. In today’s video, we’re going to do a
listening comprehension quiz on two-syllable words. Can you identify which syllable is
stressed? Why does it matter? Even if all of the sounds in a word are correct, one must
speak with long vs. short syllables in order to sound American. One of the main things
I work on with advanced students is shortening short syllables. It has an amazing impact
on reducing their accent. Let’s get started.>>So, the space that we’re getting married
in used to be a chocolate factory, about a century ago.>>Getting. What syllable is stressed, is
longer? Does it sound like DA-da or da-DA? Getting, DA-da.>>The space that we’re getting married
in [3x] Married. DA-da or da-DA?
Married, DA-da.>>The space that we’re getting married
in [3x] used to be a chocolate factory. Chocolate. Wait, is this a two-syllable or
a three-syllable word? Choc-late, choc-o-late. There are many words in English with first
syllable stress that can be pronounced with either 2 or 3 syllables, I tend to pronounce
them with 2. Chocolate. Other examples: family, restaurant. Chocolate, DA-da.>>Used to be a chocolate [3x] factory about
a century ago. About. DA-da or da-DA?
About, da-DA.>>Used to be a chocolate factory about a
century [3x] ago. Ago. DA-da or da-DA?
Ago, da-DA.>>Used to be a chocolate factory about a
century ago [3x].>>So, the space that we’re getting married
in used to be a chocolate factory, about a century ago. And now … And now it’s a photography studio, painted
all white with hardwood floors. Painted. DA-da or da-DA?
Painted, DA-da.>>…painted all [3x] white with hardwood
floors. Hardwood. DA-da or da-DA?
Hardwood, DA-da. This is a compound word. Most compound words
have stress on the first word. Compound words are words made by putting two other words
together. Other examples: bedroom, keyboard.>>With hardwood floors [3x]. It’s a little
industrial, as you can see. Little. DA-da or da-DA?
Little, DA-da.>>It’s a little industrial [3x], as you
can see. Exposed brick up there. Exposed. DA-da or da-DA?
Exposed, da-DA.>>Exposed brick [3x] up there. Wa—um. Metal
rafters. Metal. DA-da or da-DA?
Metal, DA-da.>>Wa—um. Metal rafters [3x]. Rafters. DA-da or da-DA?
Rafters, DA-da.>>Metal rafters [3x].>>And now it’s a photography studio, painted
all white with hardwood floors. It’s a little industrial as you can see. Exposed brick up
there. Wa—um. Metal rafters. This used to be the smokestack of the factory.
Smokestack: another compound word. What does that mean? Stress is probably on the first
syllable. Smokestack, DA-da.>>This used to be the smokestack [3x]. And
yeah, this is where we’re going to do it. Where we’re going to get married. Gonna. DA-da or da-DA?
Gonna, DA-da.>>And yeah. This is where we’re gonna [3x]
do it, where we’re gonna get married. So we came back today… Today. DA-da or da-DA?
Today, da-DA.>>So we came back today [3x] so that we could,
sort of, think about decorations and layout. Layout. Another compound word. DA-da or da-DA?
Layout, DA-da.>>…sort of, think about decorations and
layout [3x]. But I’m really excited about the space. Really. DA-da or da-DA?
Really, DA-da.>>But I’m really [3x] excited about the
space.>>This used to be the smokestack of the factory.
And, yeah, this is where we’re gonna do it. Where we’re gonna get married. So we
came back today so that we could, sort of, think about decorations and layout. But I’m
really excited about the space. Now it gets harder. You won’t hear the word
on its own, slowly, outside of the sentence. You’ll only hear the word in the sentence.
Can you still tell which syllable is stressed?>>I think, I think these tables come with
the space. These high tables. DA-da.>>I think these tables come with the space.
These high tables. Yeah. Exciting. Another three-syllable word that I’ve turned
into a two-syllable word.>>So, I think the tables are gonna go here.
And the bar is probably going to be somewhere else. DA-da.>>And the bar is probably going to be somewhere
else.>>And the bar is probably going to be somewhere
else. DA-da.>>Is probably going to be somewhere else.>>We are having alcohol at our wedding. DA-da. The –ing ending will never be stressed.>>We are having alcohol at our wedding.>>We are having alcohol at our wedding. DA-da.>>We are having alcohol at our wedding. Some
people choose not to. DA-da.>>Some people choose not to…>>although most people do. da-DA.>>Although most people do. And we’re getting
married, and having the reception all here in this same space. It used to be really typical
to get married in a church, less so now.>>Most of my cousins have gotten married
outside. DA-da.>>Most of my cousins have gotten married
outside. DA-da.>>Most of my cousins have gotten married
outside. DA-da. Outside can actually have stress on
either the first or the second syllable, depending on how you’re using it.>>Most of my cousins have gotten married
outside. A lot of my friends as well. We can’t do that because it’s going to be January
in Philadelphia. da-DA. I could have reduced this further to
just ‘cuz’.>>We can’t do that because it’s going
to be January in Philadelphia.>>Um, but hopefully this will be just as
lovely! DA-da.>>Um, but hopefully this will be just as
lovely! We’re going to have lots of candles. Everywhere, candles, candles, candles. DA-da. >>We’re going to have lots of candles.
Everywhere, candles, candles, candles. And, um, the chocolate that used to be made in
this factory.>>It was the precursor to the Hershey’s
kiss. DA-da.>>It was the precursor to the Hershey’s
kiss. It’s shaped the same, it’s called a Wilburbud.>>And we’re gonna have a lot of those for
our guests to enjoy as well. da-DA.>>And we’re gonna have a lot of those for
our guests to enjoy as well.>>Unless we eat them all before the wedding. da-DA.>>Unless we eat them all
before the wedding. da-DA.>>Unless we eat them all before the wedding.
Which might happen. DA-da.>>Which might happen.>>Um, we are going to have a full dinner
for our guests. DA-da.>>Um, we are going to have a full dinner
for our guests.>>That’s pretty typical as well. DA-da.>>That’s pretty typical as well.>>So, I guess I’m curious about, if you’ve
been married before, what was your wedding like? What was the space like? The venue.
Was it outdoors, indoors, was it in a church? So let me know in the comments below.>>So, I guess I’m curious about, if you’ve
been married before, what was your wedding like? What was the space like? The venue.
Was it outdoors, indoors, was it in a church? So let me know in the comments below.>>The venue. Was it outdoors, indoors, was
it in a church? So let me know in the comments below. Let’s review all the words with stress on
the first syllable. DA-da. Getting, married, chocolate, painted, hardwood, little, metal,
rafters, smokestack, gonna, layout, really, tables, probably, having, wedding, people,
cousins, gotten, lovely, candles, Hershey’s, happen, dinner, pretty, venue, comments, outdoors,
indoors Now let’s review all the words with stress
on the second syllable. da-DA. About, ago, exposed, today, although, outside, because,
enjoy, unless, before. Many more two-syllable words in English have
stress on the first syllable than the second. Was there anything about the pronunciation
of a word or a phrase in this video that you found interesting? Next week I’ll release
a bonus video with other topics from this trip to the venue!>>Alright guys, that’s it, and thanks so
much for using Rachel’s English. Click here to see related videos. Links are
also in the description below.

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