Washington Hospital offers advanced health care for women

Washington Hospital offers advanced health care for women


>>Breast cancer is very common. One in eight women in the United States will develop breast cancer at some point in their lifetime.>>The day of the diagnosis, that was kind of a, I don’t know, just a punch in the gut. But actually just hearing the words is something to get through. ♪>>I think the important theme here is that breast cancer is so common, that it affects nearly everybody, whether it’s the patient themselves or family members. We all know somebody with breast cancer — peers, friends, family — and it is so fixable and so curable if treated early, today. And so I’d really encourage women to do that, to seek early diagnosis, screening mammograms, because if problems are found, they’re easily treatable, and we can’t say that about a lot of cancers. If you can do her pre-op labs, I need a CBC… Some of the misconceptions of breast cancer are — there are several, actually. The main one is, “I can’t get breast cancer. I’ve never had a family history,” when the realities are most women who develop breast cancer don’t have a family history. The history starts with them. Other misconceptions are that “I can’t get breast cancer. I’m too young to get breast cancer.” And although it is age-related, young women, 20s, 30s, and 40s, can get breast cancer, as well. There’s also the misconception that breast cancer has to be treated with radical treatments, and that’s not the case at all. We’re getting less and less invasive in our treatment of breast cancer. And, finally, the biggest misconception may be that it’s not curable, when, in fact, it is highly curable if detected early. In general, we recommend women in their 40s to start having yearly mammograms. I’m of the belief that mammograms detect early disease and save lives. I think it’s important to push the fact that we are a nationally accredited center. And it’s important to people to know that they don’t have to travel to get first-class care. Nice to see you again.>>Thanks.>>Have a seat.>>I was diagnosed with Stage I breast cancer, and I was given some various treatment options. I could do a mastectomy. I could do a lumpectomy. And I was scheduled to visit various people — a plastic surgeon, the oncologist, the radiologist — just to get a full picture of the information that I needed to make a good decision. I was really fortunate. I had the lumpectomy, and about a week after that, I started my radiation treatment. I was eligible for a special kind of internal radiation, and then, upon my post-surgical checkup, I was told that yes, everything’s okay. All the biopsy results from the surgery were favorable to the procedure that they had in mind. Everyone’s been very helpful. Everyone’s been very kind. Certainly, the Women’s Center, where I met Laura, is one of the places where I got started with everything, and she certainly walked me through everything and has contacts with all the other physicians involved. So, it’s all been a very smooth experience for me.>>My first diagnosis was about 22 years ago. I had breast cancer on the right side, and I had mastectomy. I was good. After 22 years, I thought, “Cancer is gone.” But, unfortunately, in April, I found out I have left breast cancer. And, after that, I had lumpectomy. I always like Washington Hospital. I had my kids here. I love the comfort of having all my treatment here, actually. The mammogram, my scans — everything is here. All the employees, especially Laura, she’s always there. I can talk to her. And the support group and everything — it’s amazing.>>I’m an RN, and I’m a breast-health navigator here at Washington Hospital Women’s Center. And I navigate patients through their whole process, starting with an abnormal mammogram. Patients will see their physicians, all of them, within a week of their time of diagnosis. Right after a woman gets diagnosed with breast cancer, I think most of their anxiety is around not having their appointments or knowing what’s next to do. So, coming in and seeing me helps alleviate a lot of their fears and knowing that okay, everything’s been taken care of. And it’s a support group. They’re coming here. They don’t feel alone. So, it’s a really valuable program that we have here and that we offer. I’ve had patients come and tell me that they had so much anxiety coming into our waiting room here, but then after their treatment and coming back for a massage or coming for a yoga class, coming back for support group, they actually don’t have that anxiety. So, it’s like a home-type feeling. It’s calming. So, I think that’s really one of the most amazing things about the Women’s Center. We have nice, calming music. We have cotton robes. We have lockers in the dressing rooms so patients can lock up their belongings, that they feel those are safe. Once a woman goes into the back waiting room, it is women only. So, they feel safe there, too.>>It makes the whole experience much more comforting.>>So, one of the strengths here at Washington Hospital Women’s Center is that we provide an environment that’s very warm. And it’s about comfort, creating a warmth that’s very important here. And I think it is very unique here at Washington Hospital.>>Learn more about breast-cancer diagnosis and treatment at BayAreaHealthierTogether.com.

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